The phone call, from the FBI, brought her back to an internal conflict that she thought she’d finished wrestling with two years earlier.

A very in-depth interview of all parties involved around the sexual assault of a young female wolf activist while working in Montana and Wisconsin. This article delves into the role of how:

“…It’s incredibly damaging to the movement to have an elder be harassing women.”

Yet this article clearly demonstrates the courage of the young woman, as she refuses to harm the movement by answering the FBI questions. She wouldn’t inform on the movement.

I’m a Wisconsin wolf advocate, so when this story first came out, refused to continue working with Coronado, because he clearly refused to be accountable for this kind of predatory behavior towards woman. The article makes it clear Julie wasn’t alone or the only victim of this predatory behavior.

“But for all those who questioned Henry, there were at least as many who supported her.”

“People that have been persecuted by the state are martyrized and lionized in ways that survivors aren’t,” Anderson told The Intercept. “The way the movement takes more seriously state repression versus political violence against women allows people like Rod — not to milk it, but to use it as a shield.”

The FBI used the #MeToo movement to pressure and environmental activist into becoming an informant by Allen Brown and John Knefel from The Intercept

JULIE HENRY WAS jogging when she got the call from the FBI. She didn’t recognize the number, which had a Washington state area code, but she answered anyway. The FBI agent identified herself as Kera O’Reilly, and said that Henry wasn’t in any trouble. O’Reilly was there to help.

“People can’t fathom that someone could both be a nice person in a meeting and hit their girlfriend or sexually assault someone,” said (Brian) Frank (an organizer with Earth First!). “For some people, it’s so unbelievable they think it must be a conspiracy.”

The phone call, which Henry received on February 22, 2018, brought her back to an internal conflict that she thought she’d finished wrestling with two years earlier. O’Reilly wanted to talk to Henry about her online account of sexual assault, which was strange if you consider that the offense is a crime over which federal agents rarely have jurisdiction. But it made perfect sense considering the person she wanted to discuss: Rod Coronado.

To his supporters in the animal rights community, Coronado is a folk hero who has lived his convictions. People have even written songs celebrating him. To the FBI, Coronado is an eco-terrorist, an arsonist, and a criminal. Although the agency has already managed to put him in prison four separate times, including for setting fire to a mink research facility and dismantling a mountain lion trap, law enforcement apparently still isn’t finished with the 52-year-old activist, who publicly denounced sabotage as a tactic more than a decade ago.

Yet for all of his public accolades and detractors, Henry knew a different side of him.

Nearly four years ago, Henry says, in the midst of a campaign to monitor a state-sanctioned wolf hunt with Coronado’s organization Wolf Patrol, in a remote area outside Yellowstone National Park, Coronado sexually assaulted her. Henry says she didn’t even think about calling law enforcement. Activists aren’t supposed to talk to cops, and definitely not to FBI agents. For months, she stayed silent. But then, after agonizing over the decision, she participated in an alternative attempt at accountability — she described Coronado’s assault in an email posted to a closed activist listserv and later published the details publicly in the activist Earth First! Journal.

Henry doesn’t regret her decision, but the process was painful and disappointing. Coronado denied that anything nonconsensual happened. Although many supported her, others — including some she’d considered friends and allies — didn’t believe her. Some went so far as to label her a snitch and a federal operative, smears often directed at someone perceived to have weakened the movement by talking publicly about internal divisions that law enforcement can exploit. Read more here.

A Film Project “Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy – The Yellowstone Story”

A film that presents the viewer with a complete picture of what it means to advocate for an imperiled species protected within Yellowstone National Park; contrasted against an uncertain future because of wolf hunting taking place just beyond the park’s borders.

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy- The Yellowstone Story” tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Produced by Rachel Tilseth And Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth. Make a tax deductible contribution here to support the film project.

These stories will be the inspiration that helps the viewer to gain insight into the heart of wolf advocacy. Marc Cooke is one of the wolf advocates with a story to tell. Mark Cooke founded the nonprofit called Wolves of the Rockies headquartered out of Stevensville, Montana.

https://vimeo.com/264686221

Marc Cooke was born in Connecticut and living between both Cape Cod and Connecticut to a family of law enforcement officers. He attended parochial, public and private educational institution. During his childhood, he began what was to become a lifelong enjoyment and commitment to both domestic animals and wildlife well-being.

Marc Cooke After completion of higher education at Johnson & Wales University, he joined the United States Army to begin what would become a steady commitment to giving back to this country and causes he believed in. While in the military he was stationed in Germany and helped support Desert Storm and Desert Shield. It was during this time he met and married Lorenza and eventually moved to Switzerland.

After being Repatriated to Cape Cod Massachusetts for several years and continuing to have an interest in horses and wildlife. He eventually moved west and settled down in North West Montana.

https://vimeo.com/266407182

Enjoying all that Montana has to offer he quickly realized that wildlife was unnecessarily being abused for pleasure and profit. He became active at the grassroots level to abolish trapping in Montana. All the while watching the beginning of irrational hatred and abuse meant for wolves that had been reintroduced into Yellowstone and Idaho. He quickly shifted gears and began attending wolf related private and public hearings. It didn’t take long to realize that wolves were being railroaded and had virtually no grassroots support to defend and protect these animals at the local level. Livestock producers and all consumptive and trophy hunting organization were having their way with future wolf management in Montana and elsewhere.

As an individual, no county, state or federal decision-makers were listening. This was when Marc and several other pro-wolf individuals began National Wolf Watcher Coalition a 501 (C) 3 nonprofit. This eventually led to another nonprofit he founded called Wolves of the Rockies headquartered out of Stevensville, Montana.

Wolves of the Rockies is the most active local and national wolf defender and protector in Montana. Wolves of the Rockies has developed long-term relationships with other hunting and pro-wolf state and national conservation organizations. Along with decision makers such as Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks Commissioners and state and federal elected officials.

Marc Cooke Under Wolves of the Rockies leadership, we have achieved many pro-wolf accomplishments. The creation of two subunits 313 & 316 that border Yellowstone National Park. They have gone from no wolf killing quota to only being able to hunt or trap two wolves in each. Also, no individual hunter can kill more than one wolf in 313 & 316. Rewards for the apprehension of Yellowstone wolf poachers, derailing the intention of extending wolf hunting season in the Bitterroot Valley that would have allowed the hunting of midterm pregnant wolves. He pushed for a Montana Trapping Advisory Committee that will represent the anti-trapping public. Closing the wolf hunting season around Yellowstone National Park for several months one year. WotR has derailed or softened many legislative bills that were considered anti-wolf and carnivore.

More on this documentary film project …

Inside the “Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone” Story is the story of the people that advocate to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone. Here’s more on the other wolf advocates in the film.

Ilona Popper writer, wolf watcher and member of Bear Creek Council.

Rick Lamplugh author and member of Bear Creek Council.

Nathan is the owner of The Wild Side, LLC, a wildlife touring business specializing in outfitting groups of all ages to view wolves and other wildlife in Yellowstone National Park.

And more interviews…

Along with interviews from the Yellowstone Wolf Project Doug Smith, Rick McIntyre and Kira Cassidy.

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story”. presents the viewer with a complete picture of what it means to advocate for an imperiled species protected within Yellowstone National Park; contrasted against an uncertain future because of wolf hunts taking place just beyond the park’s borders.

About the producers…

Maaike Middleton Co Producer

M.A Documentary by Practice, University of London – Royal Holloway

Graduated with Merit  B.A Media & Theatre Arts, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, Graduated Cum Laude

Raised in the Paradise Valley, schooled in London, traveled to 25+ countries, rooted in the Montana wilds. Growing up in Paradise Valley all I wanted to do was travel and see the world. After getting my BA in Filmmaking from Montana State University I did just that. I traveled to some amazing places, from the wild Gobi dessert in Mongolia to the temples of Angor Wat in Cambodia to the hustle and bustle of London where I received a Masters in Documentary filmmaking from the University of London. Returning to Paradise Valley to document the beauty that surrounds me daily. My passport ever ready for the next international adventure and hiking boots ready to explore the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Rachel Tilseth Co Producer and Director

Rachel holds a Batchelor of Science Degree in Art Education, graduated Cum Laude and is a retired art teacher. Tilseth’s interests in nature, specifically wolves, led her to advocate for wolves and wildlife. In the year 2000 she became involved in WI DNR Wolf Recovery Program working as a volunteer winter wolf tracker to present. She founded the blog and social media network Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin to bring education and awareness to Wisconsin’s wild wolf. Tilseth has spent several years speaking out against wolf trophy hunts. Tilseth is active in working to ban Wolf Hounding in Wisconsin. She has a strong background in the visual arts. She’s a sculptor and oil painter. Tilseth has expanded her interest into filmmaking. She’s currently in the process of creating a documentary film about the heart of wolf advocacy.

Donate Here

We now have a fiscal sponsor for our film. To make a tax deductible contribution go to Plan B Foundation and donate today! Five percent of your donation goes to help wolves and wolf programs throughout the USA.

Featured photograph by Wild at Heart Images Sandi Sisti

“The Yellowstone Story-Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy” film project…

A Documentary film project that tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Co Produced by Rachel Tilseth And Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth. Donate Here to support this film project

https://vimeo.com/264686221

About the featured photograph we see Wolf #7 in shipping container in Rose Creek pen. Photograph credit NPS Jim Peaco, January 12, 1995 from public domain YNP Wolf Restoration.

Rick Lamplugh

The shooting of 06, Yellowstone’s famous alpha wolf, was a turning point for me. In the years since her death, I have come to understand how that single bullet did more than kill the alpha female and uproot the alpha male. That bullet threw the delicate social order of the pack into life-threatening disarray. That bullet forced many wolves to choose new leaders, new roles, new lives. That bullet led to my becoming a wolf advocate. And I know I’m not alone; others have told me how the death of 06 motivated them to fight for wolves. ~Rick Lamplugh, Wolf Advocate and renowned author.

Rick Lamplugh’s path to advocating for wolves.
A few years ago, (2012) my wife Mary and I spent our first full winter living and working at the Lamar Buffalo Ranch in the heart of Yellowstone’s wolf country. We were thrilled to see wolves almost every day. Our second winter, sadly, was much quieter than the first. The valley did not resound with the howls of wolves. We did not see the Lamar Canyon wolves resting on the hillside above the ranch. Instead, we felt the shock and sadness of watching the pack disintegrate after the female alpha and one of the adult males was shot outside the park in Wyoming. Observing firsthand the destructive impact of hunting on wolves we had come to know and respect, started me thinking about advocating for wolves.

My experiences and learning during those three winters became the basis for a book, In the Temple of Wolves: A Winter’s Immersion in Wild Yellowstone. As the book became an Amazon best seller, I grew certain of the debt I owed wolves. If I was going to benefit from writing about them, I must speak for them as well. I became a wolf advocate.

Eventually Mary and I heeded the pull of Yellowstone, left Oregon where we had lived for 36 years, and moved to Gardiner, Montana, at the park’s north entrance. We have been surprised to learn that Gardiner sits smack in the middle of a number of controversies: the dispute over hunting Yellowstone wolves outside the park; the debate whether wolves help or harm the ecosystem and the local economy; the concern about overuse of and development around the park; the community effort to stop a possible gold mine on the park’s border; the outrage over the plan to remove grizzlies from the endangered species list; and the battle to stop the slaughter of park bison.

While living at the Lamar Buffalo Ranch—a wildlife-filled bubble where animals roamed without fear of human intervention—I had stayed blissfully unaware of most of these controversies. But I cannot avoid them in Gardiner, nor do I want to. Instead, I immerse myself in the midst of these struggles. I’ve become an advocate for wildlife and wildlands.

Indie author Rick Lamplugh writes to protect wildlife and preserve wild lands. His new book, Deep into Yellowstone, is available signed from Rick at http://bit.ly/2tIEt62, or unsigned on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2tgPU3E.

His best seller, In the Temple of Wolves, is available signed at http://bit.ly/1gYghB4, or unsigned at http://amzn.to/Jpea9Q.

A signed set of both books is available with free shipping at http://bit.ly/2uYTtsU.

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story” A Documentary film project that tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Co Produced by Rachel Tilseth And Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth.

To support the film project go to Plan B Foundation ” Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy” and donate

Please take action to keep wolf hunt quota low near Yellowstone National Park to support wolf tourism and research. 

Action Alert courtesy of Ilona Popper.

1.      Call each Montana Fish, Wildlife, Parks Commissioner:

Tim Aldrich, (406) 241-7164  (I just had a great conversation with him!)                                                                                                      Dan Vermillion, Chairman (406) 222-0624  or dan@sweetwatertravel.com  (our district)                                                  Richard Stuker, Vice-Chairman (406) 357-3495                                 Logan Brower, (406)230-2188                                                                     Shane Colton, (406) 259-9986

2.      Go to the meeting on Jan 24 and speak up.  Bozeman or Helena.

3.      Email Karen Loveless, Howard Burt, and Mark Delerey so they hear the other side from Gardiner:kloveless@mt.gov    hburt@mt.gov    mdelerey@mt.gov

The most important points are:

1. We thank FWP for proposing a quota of 2 wolves in unit 316 and 2 wolves in unit 313 and we ask that the Commissioners vote to approve these quotas.

2. We want to see FWP protect wolves in this area and keep quotas low and even lower in 313/316 to support wolf tourism and research. 

• Studies show that density of predators like wolves and lions can lower the rates of Chronic Wasting Disease in elk and deer.  (sources: N. Thompson Hobbs wrote “A Model Analysis of Effects of Wolf Predation on the Prevalence of Chronic Wasting Disease in Elk Populations of Rocky Mountain National Park.” by Hobbs  and “Mountain lions prey selectively on prion-infected mule deer,” lead author Caroline E. Krumm.)

• There already is plenty of “trophy hunter opportunity” for wolves nearby in Gardiner Basin, Paradise Valley and throughout Montana.

• Wolves in Gardiner basin (and throughout Montana) take very few livestock.

3.   We support FWPs review of the ways that they count wolves in Gardiner basin to better reflect the actual resident packs and the numbers of wolves that regularly use this area.  If the count inaccurately comes out to 30 resident wolves, as it did in 2016, quotas may be set too high and too many wolves removed.

Current FWP surveys show 12-15 resident wolves in this area, and as territorial animals, they mostly keep other wolves out.  At the proposed total quota of 4, we will kill 25% to 33% of the wolves in Gardiner basin. (FWP claims people may kill up to 29% without harm to the population, but we want to see a far lower percentage–see our point #2.)

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Featured image by NPS / Jim Peaco

Protecting wolves: Activism with ‘Heart’ 

The Grand Teacher or The Big Bad Wolf

Can Native American activism and ancient wisdom save the wolves? Source

JACKSON HOLE, WY – Last summer Roger Dobson, a tribal spokesman for advocacy group Protect the Wolves, spent two months in Yellowstone observing and videotaping 911M, an old pepper-gray wolf with sparkling eyes. He watched the blacktail alpha male of the Junction Butte pack uncharacteristically introduce another male into his pack to breed with the females.
Dobson observed him watch his pack with the wisdom of an old sage. Later that year, after a valiant fight and several injuries, Prospect Peak wolves killed 911M.
After three wolves from the pack were harvested in late 2016, and another disappeared, the Junction Butte pack was only seen sporadically and it was difficult to identify its wolves.
Dobson says a turning point for him as an activist was when he videotaped outfitters riding right by the den where the Junction Butte pack lived in Yellowstone. “They were within 75 feet of the den, which is illegal, and their horses were loose, but they didn’t receive a ticket or get banned,” he said. A district park ranger called them 30 times, and Dobson asserts, “they saw the missed calls but claimed their phone never rang.” He believes this is what drove the pack out of the area to create another den, which had a negative impact on the size and health of the pack.
“It’s disgusting,” Dobson said, “what people—ranchers and hunters—get away with.” He said a lot of Native Americans believe in protecting wolves but don’t want to be outspoken or ruffle feathers. But a true activist, he said, doesn’t sugar coat the issues or compromise integrity by allowing rich outfitters to get away with disturbing a wolf sanctuary. When they’re “in bed” with the local politicians and ranchers who have donated to advocacy groups that play “both sides of the fence,” then prominent wolf experts support management plans that put ranchers ahead of wildlife and treat wolves like “pests.”
Dobson said he has received more than 100 death threats, but it doesn’t bother him. He told one caller, “We’ll just meet in the woods and handle this the old Indian way,” and never heard from him again.
Native American traditions depict the wolf as a “grand teacher” and sage who returns after many years upon a sacred path to relay knowledge and wisdom to the tribe. Their sacredness is extolled by people who study the natural world. “The gaze of the wolf reaches into your soul,” wrote naturalist and author Barry Lopez.
Indeed, wolves are important in the history of almost all Native American tribes. They are considered closely related to humans, and loyal to their packs and mate. In Shoshone mythology, the wolf plays the role of the noble creator. Some tribes have wolf clans, and there are wolf dances, totem poles with wolf carvings, and clan crests for tribes of the Northwest Coast, such as the Tlingit and Tsimshian.
In contrast, Western folklore has a different outlook with stories like Little Red Riding Hood and The Big Bad Wolf and the Three Little Pigs. American idioms, too, illustrate a notion counter to what Native Americans believe: “Throw you to the wolves”; “A wolf in sheep’s clothing”; and Don’t “put one’s head in the wolf’s mouth.”
In Native American teaching, the wolf embodies wisdom, courage and faith. The material world is comprised of relentless sorrows and difficulties, and to overcome them one must trust in a higher spirit. The wolf is a symbol of that spirit on earth, as is the grizzly and the owl. But Western ideology tends to separate the human spirit from the earth and its creatures. It is a dichotomy that has fueled the debate about who gets control of what land and who has the right to hunt what animal. To read full article click here.

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Protect the Wolves
Please Help to not only Support Protect the Wolves™ in this vision, but become part of this Vision as if it was your Vision! None of us have the necessary funding to make this happen on our own. But Together we can make an Impact in the lives of Wolves as well as People . All supporters will be invited to participate in all of her programs, either online, or at The Sanctuary. Please Help Protect the Wolves™ vision to not only keep these animals safe, but to educate the public on their need! Help us make certain that these amazing animals are available for our children’s children to see, thereby insuring that they retain their important role in the circle of life. For more information on Protect the Wolves Click here

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Featured image: NPS / Jim Peaco

Life of a wild wolf family in Montana captured on a remote video camera.

A remote video camera captured a wild wolf family in Montana playing at a rendezvous site.  The definition of a wolf rendezvous site is a place for puppies to stay while the rest of the family is off hunting.  Wolves will leave the pups with a babysitter for safe keeping at a rendezvous site. In this video the adult babysitter plays a game of tug of war using a stick and all the pups join in on the game.


  
Screen shot of the adult babysitter at a rendezvous site in Montana June 2015


Rally this summer to: Urge federal officials to create a no-hunting and no-trapping zone for wolves and Grizzly bears around Yellowstone National Park

Please join us, Campaign for Yellowstone’s Wolves,  to help mobilize park visitors in support of Yellowstone’s wolves and grizzly bears this summer. 

Volunteers are needed to hand out fliers to visitors at Yellowstone National Park that educate the public on the urgent need to create a no- hunting buffer zone around the park to protect wolves and grizzly bears. Sign up here:

July 7-10 volunteer sign up click HERE

July 14-17 volunteer sign up click HERE

July 21-24 volunteer sign up click HERE

And, if you can donate, please click HERE

We need a few more amiable volunteers for visitor outreach in the Park, from June 30-July 4 and from July 29-August 7. Message us for details at Campaign for Yellowstone’s Wolves

  

We need a no-hunting buffer zone around Yellowstone National Park

  

Please join Campaign for Yellowstone’s Wolves in fighting for a buffer zone around Yellowstone National Park. Create a no-hunting-zone to protect wolves and grizzly bears. 

Click HERE to donate to this rally We’ll rally this summer to reach thousands of visitors to Yellowstone National Park, drawing their attention to threats facing the park’s Wolves and Grizzly Bears from nearby trophy hunting, poaching and unnecessary lethal “controls”. Donations are needed to allow us to print the materials we need for successful public outreach: color brochures, petitions, action flyers, signs and banners, campaign t-shirts, and articles on Yellowstone’s Wolves and Grizzly Bears.

The founders of Campaign for Yellowstone’s Wolves are the husband and wife team of Drs. Tony Povilitis and Dusti Becker. They are both wildlife biologists who began the campaign three years ago because of their outrage at the horrific trophy killing of Yellowstone Park’s famous alpha female called “Oh-six” and a dozen other wolves that happened to cross the park boundary that year.

Since then, they have pushed for a no-hunt, safety zone for Wolves around the park through direct meetings with policy makers, letters and phone calls to political leaders, written articles, online and hand-written petitions, public outreach in Yellowstone Park and more. Please check out the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WolfYellowstone/

Since 2011, at least 22 wolves that lived mainly in the park and 34 other Yellowstone area wolves have been killed in state-approved wolf hunts. Those numbers would have been higher if legal action had not prevented wolf hunts in Wyoming for three of the last five years.

Now it’s become apparent that Yellowstone Grizzly Bears also need help. This iconic species for which hundreds of thousands of visitors annually come to Yellowstone National Park to see has come under attack as the federal government proposes to remove their protected status as well.

Our summer outreach rallies will heighten awareness among park visitors and mobilize their support in a broader campaign to put an end to government policies harmful to Wolves and Grizzly Bears. Please give these incredible animals a powerful “citizens voice” by supporting this campaign. Don’t let them down! 

A century ago, Wolves were hunted and trapped to extermination from the park and surrounding areas as part of very misguided government policy. They were absent from Yellowstone’s ecosystem for the better part of the 20th century to the significant detriment of the park’s biological diversity. Since their re-introduction in the mid-1990s, the park has shown demonstrable ecological healing and rejuvenation. It is our duty as responsible stewards of our precious wild lands to insure that Yellowstone Wolves and Bears are now FULLY protected and NEVER exploited.

Any donation (Click HERE to donate) is most appreciated. Nothing is too small. Let’s make this campaign a huge success! Your kind support will help us reach many thousands of park visitors this summer, the 100th anniversary of our National Park Service. If you’d like to join us in Yellowstone, please contact us through our Facebook page.

Each of us, working together, can make a huge difference for Yellowstone Wolves and Grizzly Bears – their very lives and the majesty of Yellowstone depend on it!

For more information click HERE