A grave reminder of things to come for Wisconsin’s wild wolf: a species in peril…

Photograph is of a young wolf killed by a hunter that used dogs in the Wisconsin wolf hunt 2014. 

I wrote the following opinion editorial in September of 2014 just before the third Wisconsin wolf trophy hunt was about to commence. Nothing is more shocking than using dogs to hunt down wolves.  Wisconsin is the only state that allows this barbaric sport; Throws dogs to wolves. Wisconsin’s wolf is currently on the Endangered Species List, but for how long? Politicians are working to delist wolves in The Great Lakes region, essentially giving back management of an imperiled species to states, such as Wisconsin, that have a track record of mismanagement. As delisting threats are looming in congress the following opinion editorial is a reminder of things to come. Read on :

Column: Still plenty of problems with the wolf hunt by Rachel Tilseth, September 29, 2014 in Wausau Daily Herald

It is about time states are held accountable for their cruel treatments of wolves, a recently endangered species. Delisting wolves federally put them in the hands of states that haven’t learned from past mistakes. This surely is the beginning of the end for wolf hating state agencies in charge of wolf management.
Wisconsin’s DNR is in the same category as Wyoming’s by demonstrating the same, ‘hostile and extreme anti-wolf policies.’ This is all because DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp’s handpicked Wolf Advisory Committee (WAC) is stacked with wolf haters.
Several scientists wrote a letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services cautioning that vital information is missing from DNR wolf slaughter statistics.
Stepp booted several important scientists from her WAC that could have prevented vital information from being left out of DNR wolf slaughter Statistics in the first place.
Oh, but wait there’s more.
Now Stepp wants the DNR to find out if dogs are really killing wolves in the woods. So listen to this, Stepp’s solution is (to paraphrase) to ask wolf hunters to let federal wildlife officials watch them skin their wolf.
This latest blow for the health of Wisconsin wolf population makes it apparent Stepp’s leadership skills are below standards, to the point of a complete loss of ethics. The Oxford dictionary defines ‘ethics’ as ‘A branch of knowledge that deals with moral principles.’
The western schools of ethics break it down into three concepts or codes. The first being virtues such as justice for one. Then the second is duty such as morality. Thirdly that the principle of conduct for the benefit of the greatest number.
We now have a DNR administration completely unable to monitor or enforce if dogs are killing wolves. It is illegal for hunting dogs to engage and kill wildlife. Remember that US Fish and Wildlife Services are supposedly monitoring how well DNR can manage its wolves. After all, wolves were extinct or extirpated from our woods a few short decades ago and certainly could happen again if not managed wisely.
Stepp’s WAC committee is run by citizen pro-wolf hunters that lack a moral compass. It is important to know that these fringe hunters are crafting this wolf hunt to suit their own agendas. Asking the wolf hunters to voluntarily submit to an inspection is outrageous and almost comical. Do you really think any hunter whose dogs just killed a wolf will volunteer for this sham?
This can be compared to asking a serial killer to volunteer to present his human kill to a medical examiner. Where is the professional conduct in this? Where is the justice for the illegally killed wolf/wolves?
The public perception is that dogs are killing wolves and that’s illegal. And rules to monitor this controversial method of hunting should have been in place for the first wolf hunt. We are now approaching the third wolf hunt season.
I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Stepp must resign for dereliction of duty, because she willfully refuses to carry out her duties as DNR Secretary.
Citizens want wolves in Wisconsin and do not approve of the use of dogs in the wolf hunt. Public input must be respected.

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Wolf Hounding Fact Sheet: Wisconsin, quite literally, throws dogs to wolves

At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.  ~Aristotle

The following is a wolf hounding fact sheet: 

 Out of all the states that hunt wolves, only Wisconsin allows hound hunters to use unleashed packs of dogs to hunt wolves. Wisconsin, quite literally, throws “dogs to the wolves.”Hound hunters traditionally train their dogs to focus on specific prey by releasing their dogs to surround, attack and terrorize a prey animal (e.g. a bear cub or fox) for hours on end (up to 16 hours/day) enclosed in a small, open barrel or “roll cage.” At this point it remains disturbingly unclear as to how hound hunters will train their dogs to pursue wolves instead of other animals—will it be by capturing wolves and allowing their dogs to attack them in barrels and pens? How isn’t this worse than illegal dog fighting?

 “There has never been a more important time for the people of Wisconsin to show they are not going to give in to a small group of people that want to torture animals for fun under the guise of “sport.”  ~Rachel Tilseth

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, charged with overseeing the wolf hunt, has no rules in place that require hound handlers to report dogs injured or killed in the pursuit of wolves during a hunt. In fact, there is no monitoring or certification program whatsoever in place for the use of dogs in the wolf hunt; thus the state has little ability to hold hound hunters accountable for training or hunting violations or to prevent deadly and inhumane wolf-dog confrontations (e.g., hunters allowing dogs to overtake and kill rifle-shot wolves). These circumstances explain why Wisconsin stands alone: using dogs to hunt wolves is no better than state-sponsored dog fighting.

In 2013 & 2014 Wisconsin sanctioned the use of dogs to hunt wolves. 

Hound handlers are equipped with high tech radio telemetry devices that allow them to track GPS-collared hunting dogs from long distances. They are often not able to catch up to hounds that have a wolf at bay to prevent deadly fights between dogs and wolves. As proof of this, to date, Wisconsin has paid nearly $500,000 to “reimburse” hound-hunters for hunting dogs injured or killed by wolves. See link WDNR Dog depredations by wolves

Wisconsin, quite literally, throws “dogs to the wolves.”

According to DNR regulations, hound handlers are only allowed to use up to six dogs at a time to trail wolves. But handlers often replace tired dogs with fresh ones and younger dogs. It is common for a handler to be unable to retrieve the tired dogs, and end up with up well over 6 dogs chasing one wolf, potentially twice or even three times as many. There is no monitoring system in place to ensure that only 6 dogs pursue wolves.

I wrote the following in 2013 just prior to the first wolf hunt in Wisconsin to use dogs; I’ve seen first hand the effects of this bloody sport of running hound on bear as a seasoned WDNR winter wolf/carnivore volunteer tracker. I’ve seen the torn up bodies of bear hound dogs after an encounter with wolves. The wolves were defending their pups against a pack of hound dogs. This year wolf hounders can use six dogs at a time to chase wolves. What will happen if the hound’s handler is not right there when the wolf turns to defend himself? I think this will turn into a bloody dog versus wolf fight resulting in dead dogs and wolves. I am betting that this is a sport that Wisconsinites will not condone.

*Wolf hunters are not reimbursed when wolves kill dog/dogs while in pursuit of wolves, but are when in pursuit of bear.  

Join Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin’s campaign to end Wolf Hounding 

 Contact us wolvesdouglasco@gmail.com 

TAKE ACTION: contact your Wisconsin Legislator click here and make it clear you do not sanction Wolf Hounding in Wisconsin!
 

The Wisconsin legislature sanctioned “Wolf Hounding ” with 2011 Wisconsin Act 169 that allows the use of dogs to track and trail wolves. 2011 Wisconsin Act 169

Wisconsin politicians are pushing for state management of wolves… 

If the people want the state to manage wolves then there must be full transparency of that process. Until then we must work to keep wolves listed on the Endangered Species Act. 

The state has a law on the books that calls for a mandatory wolf hunt if they are delisted.  Wisconsin is the only state that allows the barbaric use of dogs to hunt wolves with no regulations in place; The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, charged with overseeing the wolf hunt, has no rules in place that require hound handlers to report dogs injured or killed in the pursuit of wolves during a hunt. In fact, there is no monitoring or certification program whatsoever in place for the use of dogs in the wolf hunt; thus the state has little ability to hold hound hunters accountable for training or hunting violations or to prevent deadly and inhumane wolf-dog confrontations (e.g., hunters allowing dogs to overtake and kill rifle-shot wolves). These circumstances explain why Wisconsin stands alone: using dogs to hunt wolves is no better than state-sponsored dog fighting. Source

Several politicians want state control of wolves.  Two Wisconsin state republican legislators are in favor of state management of wolves; Rep Adam Jarchow and senator Tom Tiffany along with US republican Senators Reid Ribble and Ron Johnson are pushing to delist wolves. Senator Tiffany stated in a recent news strory: 

“A state Senator is renewing his focus on delisting the wolf from the endangered species classification. State Senator Tom Tiffany wants U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin to advocate for the change, and end what he calls “ping ponging” litigation over the issue.” Source

 State senator Tom Tiffany stated in a news story: 

“Tiffany and state Representative Representative Adam Jarchow – both Republicans – think Baldwin, a Democrat, could make a difference. “If some of her colleagues saw a Democrat like she is taking the lead on this issue, they would probably follow along,” Tiffany said.” Source

US senator Tammy Baldwin a democrat is in agreement of delisting wolves and in a recent statement said: 

“I have heard the voices of Wisconsinites who have real concerns about the increasing threat of our state’s growing wolf population. Farmers have found livestock injured and killed by wolves that are straying closer to their herds than in previous years. Families have lost pets. Parents have decided it’s no longer safe to let their kids play where they normally do.  These concerns, and the expertise of wildlife science, tell us we should take on the gray wolf problem in our state by acting again to delist the wolf from the Endangered Species List and pass management of the wolf back to the State of Wisconsin.”  Source

If the people want the state to manage wolves then there must be full transparency of that process. 

The push for state management comes after 37 hunting dogs were killed by wolves while in pursuit of bear. These politicians believe that Wisconsins growing wolf population is the cause of these conflicts. Yet there are some that question if wolves are the cause of bear hunting dog deaths. 
Adrian Wydeven, retired WI DNR wolf biologist, wrote in an opinion editorial:

“Do wolf numbers correlate with wolves killing hounds? The evidence suggests this might not necessarily be the case. In 2012, only seven dogs were killed and yet there were nearly as many wolves in 2012 as there were in 2016 (815 wolves in late winter 2012).  In other words, the wolf populations in 2012 and 2016 were similar, yet these two years represent the highest and the lowest numbers of hounds killed by wolves in the last 13 years. Obviously, there is more to this story than just more wolves killing more hounds.” Source

What could be the cause behind all the wolf depredations of hound hunting dogs if it is not due to an increases in wolf population?

Every summer hound hunting dogs lose there lives in pursuit of bear. This decades old conflict between  bear hunters and wolves continues today with no end in sight. Watch the following Wisconsin Public Television show that aired in 2010:

Wolves are a part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy. Recovery of wolves in the state began in the late 1970s. 

In 2015 there was a change made in bear hunting regulations and could this be the cause of the increase in wolf depredations of dogs in pursuit of bear?  In his recent opinion editorial Wydeven states:

“Could a change in bear hunting policy be a factor? Wisconsin is a major destination for bear hunting and training — with some of the highest bear densities and bear harvest success rates in the nation.  Prior to July 2015, people putting out bait and handling hounds used to train on bears were required to buy a Class B Bear Permit. The permit cost residents $14 and nonresidents $110. The permit and fees were eliminated in 2015 and now anyone can freely bait for bears, and train their dogs on bears. This may have increased baiting and training of dogs on bears in Wisconsin, putting more bear hunters and hounds in the hunt, especially from out-of-state residents with the license fee no longer a barrier. ” Source

 It’s no secret that there has been a few instances of wolf depredations on livestock, pets and bear hunting dogs. Wisconsin has a wolf depredation compensation program in place to compensate for these loses. For instance; there is a $2500.00 compensation payment to bear hunters that lose dogs to wolves while pursuing bears.  There are programs in place to aide livestock owners as well.  Watch the following video from the WI DNR wildlife depredations specialist:

In the west wolf advocates and ranchers have been coming together to work for non lethal ways to manage wolf depredation. 

“The group’s nonlethal experiment, known as the Wood River Wolf Project, is a collaboration with Blaine County officials in central Idaho, the United States Forest Service, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and some local partners who support alternative ways of protecting wolves in historic sheep-grazing country. The project covers 1,200 square miles, or around half of Blaine County, up from 120 at the program’s inception in 2008.” Source

I believe we must help Wisconsin livestock producers learn how to live with wolves and so I am working with Ian Whalan, inventor and Fauna Tomlinson, distributer of Foxlights a nighttime predator deterrent that is making news all over the world, “Saving Lives with Lights.” Foxlights donated Five solar lights to the Red Cliff Reservation in northern Wisconsin, and I delivered the lights to the Red Cliff Biologist Jeremy St.Arnold. To learn more about Foxlights click HERE.

The recent national and state elections have tipped the scales of power towards one party control. What’s next for Wisconsin’s wild wolves?

US Senator Ron Johnson is preparing to introduce a wolf delisting bill in congress with democratic Senator Tammy Baldwin on board; could mean that other senate democrats will follow her lead, and sign onto Senator Johnson’s wolf delisting bill.  Please keep calling your senate representatives and ask them not sign onto any wolf delisting bills or riders. 

And, everyone is awaiting the decision on The USFW had a hearing to challenge a Judge putting wolves back on ESL on U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell in Washington, D.C. Who ruled in 2014 that the removal “was arbitrary and capricious and violated the federal Endangered Species Act.”  That was held on October 18, 2016.  

“Led by the Humane Society of the United States, environmentalists challenged the rule, arguing that FWS couldn’t designate a population segment under the Endangered Species Act just to turn around and remove protections. They also charged that FWS couldn’t show that wolves would be adequately protected from disease and human harm across a “significant portion” of their range without federal protections.” Source: HSUS 

If management of wolves is returned back into the state’s hands things must change about how they manage them. 

Senator Tammy Baldwin said in her statement:

“Delisting the wolf should not mean removing it from the landscape, but restoring a greater balance in rural communities. Many Wisconsinites have deeply felt beliefs about how the wolf population should be managed, and the health of the wolf population is of unique significance to Native American Tribes. I believe those debates deserve thoughtful and careful consideration by state and tribal wildlife experts, following a federal delisting.” Source

Please keep up the “positive” calls to Senator Tammy Baldwin’s office. It’s not to late to change the Senator’s mind about delisting the wolf. 


If the people want the state to manage wolves then there must be full transparency of that process. Wisconsinites must work together in the wolf management process. First things first; The state has a law on the books that calls for a mandatory wolf hunt if they are delisted and this law must be removed. 

2011 Wisconsin Act 169 states: If the wolf is not listed on the federal endangered list and is not listed on the state endangered list, the department shall allow the hunting and trapping of wolves and shall regulate such hunting and trapping as provided in this section and shall implement a wolf management plan. In regulating wolf hunting and trapping, the department may limit the number of wolf hunters and trappers and the number of wolves that may be taken by issuing wolf harvesting licenses.

The Wisconsin public must be fully vested in the process of wolf management.  When wolves were delisted in 2011 the Wisconsin legislature rushed in to create a wolf hunt. It’s no secret that the Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association’s hands were all over the wolf hunt legislation. 

After removing the wolf hunt bill, act 169, Wisconsinites can begin the discussion or debates as to how best to manage wolves. This means listening to scientific evidence and leaving political rhetoric out of the debate on wolf management. We must find ways to live with wolves. A wolf hunt is not a way to manage an endangered species such as the iconic wolf. 

First of all, stay positive & work to keep wolves listed on the Endangered Species Act. Stay in contact with your state and federal representatives. 

Wolves have a positive impact on Wisconsin’s landscape. During the Wisconsin premiere of the award winning documentary “Medicine of the Wolf” Q&A panel discussion panel member Randy Jurewicz answered an audience question about wolf’s impact on CWD, watch the following video:

For how to purchase a copy of the film Medicine of the Wolf click HERE 

 Stay positive & please continue taking action for wolves:

Keep writing letters to the editor, keep calling your state and federal legislators, and call President Obama and ask him to veto extinction and to stop the attacks on the Endangered Species Act. Click here for ways to contact the White House

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Featured image by John E Marriott

Spike in wolf depredation is a result of the class B bear license being eliminated…

Former DNR biologists Adrian Wydeven says the wolf population wasn’t all that different in 2012 when only 7 were reportedly killed by wolves.  He believes the spike in wolf depredation is a result of the class B bear license being eliminated. Wydeven there are likely a larger number of dogs out hunting and tracking bears this year since the permit is no longer required. Source

News articles foooding Wisconsin papers this week continue to scapegoat the wolf instead of addressing the real problem. 

Read the following article: 

Hunters worry over safety after record number of hunting dogs killed by wolves By Jorge Rodas

OCONTO FALLS, Wis. (WBAY) — A record number of hunting dogs have been killed in Wisconsin by wolves during this year’s bear hunt and hunters are not happy about it.
Hunters are once again pushing for wolf population management.
Manny Elbe is an experienced bear hunter and says there are too many wolves roaming free.
“It’s a terrible thing when your dog’s eaten alive, you know, and it hasn’t happened to me yet but a lot of guys that i know, they’ve lost a lot of good dogs,” said Eble.
During this year’s bear hunt, a record 40 hunting dogs were killed by wolves.
Eble says it’s a simple equation — more wolf attacks, means more wolves.
But former DNR biologists Adrian Wydeven says the wolf population wasn’t all that different in 2012 when only 7 were reportedly killed by wolves.
He believes the spike in wolf depredation is a result of the class B bear license being eliminated. Wydeven there are likely a larger number of dogs out hunting and tracking bears this year since the permit is no longer required.
Eble says wolf population is larger than the state acknowledges – the Wis. DNR says the number is about 900.
“It’s an estimate — and that’s the world that we work in – but when you can put years of data trends in terms of whether the population is increasing or decreasing and certainly over the past three years that population has grown,” says Jeff Pritzl, Wis. DNR regional program manager.
“When you’re looking for tracks in the winter coyote hunting you’ll find 25 wolf tracks to 2 coyote tracks,” Eble says, convinced wolf population is the main reason for the dog killings.
 
Wolves are federally protected because they’re on the endangered species list meaning they can’t be hunted in Wisconsin. Right now the courts are determining if they should continue to be on that list.
Eble says until that’s settled, more dogs will be killed.
“20 seconds is all it takes and your dog’s literally ripped in half,” Eble said. “Blackberry pickers, a lot of people you talk to, they’re all carrying guns. They’re not worried about bears, they’re worried about wolves.”  Source

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Featured image John E Marriott

Michigan coyote hunter on trail: charges stem from a YouTube video of hunting dogs attacking and killing a wounded coyote. Jury finds not guilty…

Update: Friday 4/29/16 (there is no justice for this coyote) 
Bessemer – After about two hours of deliberation, a 12-person jury cleared Jason Charles Roberts, 35, of Ironwood, of all charges in Gogebic County Circuit Court Thursday.  Source

Source: DNR’s Emery testifies in second day of coyote trial

By RICHARD JENKINS

 

GOGEBIC COUNTY Prosecutor Nick Jacobs, right, questions DNR Sgt. Grant Emery, second from right, Wednesday during the trial of Jason Charles Roberts. Also in the courtroom were, from left, Gogebic County Clerk Gerry Pelissero and Circuit Court Judge Michael Pope.

 
Bessemer – The second day of Jason Charles Roberts’ trial on animal cruelty charges in Gogebic Circuit Court consisted of testimony by Department of Natural Resources Sgt. Grant Emery Wednesday.
Roberts faces a felony charge of torturing an animal and misdemeanors for cruelty to an animal and failure to kill a wounded animal. The first charge carries a maximum sentence of four years in prison, while the others have maximum sentences of 93 days and 90 days, respectively.
The charges stem from a YouTube video of hunting dogs attacking and killing a wounded coyote.

Bessemer – The second day of Jason Charles Roberts’ trial on animal cruelty charges in Gogebic Circuit Court consisted of testimony by Department of Natural Resources Sgt. Grant Emery Wednesday.
Roberts faces a felony charge of torturing an animal and misdemeanors for cruelty to an animal and failure to kill a wounded animal. The first charge carries a maximum sentence of four years in prison, while the others have maximum sentences of 93 days and 90 days, respectively.
The charges stem from a YouTube video of hunting dogs attacking and killing a wounded coyote.
Gogebic County Prosecutor Nick Jacobs began his direct examination of Emery by establishing Emery’s basic resume, including his 17-year career as a conservation officer and his love of the outdoors.
“Conservation officers – it’s more than a job, it’s a way of life for us,” Emery said.
Emery testified the nature of his job gives him the discretion to determine when to issue citations and when to simply give a warning.
Jacobs followed this line of questioning by establishing the timeline of Emery’s investigation into the YouTube video.
Once Emery established what the prosecution viewed as the basic facts of the case, Jacobs began a series of hypothetical scenarios questioning what laws required of hunters related to the dispatching of game animals.
Emery told jurors hunters are obligated to immediately dispatch wounded game animals and make a reasonable effort to retrieve game.
“Immediate to me means without delay. The hunters code of ethics that we follow – we want clean, quick kills,” Emery said. “Killing an animal is violent, and we all understand that. Killing is violent – but quick and clean, that’s what we want.”
He acknowledged different styles of hunting allowed different standards for what constituted immediately killing the animal, using the example of waiting hours before pursuing a deer shot with a bow as an example.
Emery testified the standards largely depended on what the common practices of the hunting style were, later testifying some delays dispatching game was allowed if it enhanced the ability to retrieve the dead animal. Such as allowing a deer to “lie and die” when shot rather than pursuing it immediately.
Jacobs also asked Emery about testimony he gave during previous court appearances in the case.
Emery testified that while he previously testified dogs were allowed to kill game in Michigan and the owner of a hunting dog wasn’t obligated to dispatch an animal wounded by someone else, a recent review of the game regulations showed him both of those assertions were incorrect.
While dogs were allowed to be used in the tracking and pursuit of game, Emery told the jury his interpretation of the law after reviewing additional sections was that dogs killing game animals was prohibited.
He said while accidental kills were technically a violation, he likely wouldn’t cite hunters in those cases as there wasn’t an intent to have the dogs kill game.
Jacobs also entered several pieces of evidence into the record, including a copy of the video Emery obtained from Google – YouTube’s parent company – and accompanying documentation.
Roberts’ attorney, Roy Polich, objected to the inclusion of the evidence Emery obtained from Google. Polich made several arguments explaining his objection, including his belief that while Emery was able to establish the video sent by Google was indeed the video on YouTube that prompted the case, he couldn’t testify that it was an accurate depiction of the hunt.
Polich said while Emery believed the video was shot in February 2014 and showed illegal activity, there is no way to know the date of the hunt or what actually happened in the woods because Emery’s sole source of information is the video – which didn’t come to his attention until approximately a month after it was uploaded.
He compared the admission of the video to a photograph, arguing Michigan’s rules of evidence usually required the photographer or someone present when the photo was taken who can testify the photo is accurate.
“In this case, the first time this witness looked at (the video), by even the download date, was a month later. So, when was it taken? We don’t know. Where was it taken? We don’t know,” Polich said.
Gogebic County Circuit Court Judge Michael Pope ruled the video could be used as evidence in the case – saying among the date, location and events surrounding the hunt are things the prosecution has to establish during the trial – but ruled other information obtained from Google regarding unrelated material wasn’t going to be entered as evidence.
Jacob’s questioning also included showing the YouTube video, followed by Emery testifying on the video’s content.
Following Jacobs’ direct examination, Polich cross-examined Emery.
Among the areas Polich focused on during his cross was the change in Emery’s understanding of the law between previous hearings and Wednesday and if Wednesday’s interpretation of the law was an objective reading of the relevant text.
“Where does it say dogs are not allowed to kill game,” Polich asked after Emery read what he said was the applicable law.
Emery responded that it wasn’t listed as an allowed activity in the law.
“Why would you tell this jury and this court that (the section of law) says they can’t kill game,” Polich asked.
Emery responded that the prohibition on dogs killing game was his interpretation of the text.
“So not only you didn’t know about it … the last two times you testified, now you have a new interpretation of it.”
Emery disputed the idea it was a new interpretation, arguing he didn’t have a previous interpretation.
Polich also raised the change in understanding of the law regarding the responsibility of the dog owner.
He also pressed on the requirement that game be immediately dispatched, arguing the coyote in the video was alive for a much shorter time than game is allowed to be in other types of hunting.
“You already agree that it took (the dog that killed the coyote) less than a minute,” Polich asked. “So if we presume that there is no law that says a dog can’t kill a coyote – you know we’re just talking about (the immediate kill requirement) – was perhaps (the dog) the best method to quickly kill this coyote?”
Polich asked if given the circumstances of the hunt – which he said occurred in deep snow and where all the ammunition was used – the use of a dog to kill the coyote was more humane than any of the available alternatives. Emery disagreed with the idea that using the dogs was humane, citing possible alternatives including clubbing or stabbing the animal depending on what was available.
Polich’s line of questioning continued in an effort to show jurors that the use of dogs to kill game was as standard in coyote hunting as not immediately pursuing wounded deer while bow hunting.
The trial continues at 9 a.m. today.

The Most Barbaric Video You will See This Year

And nobody’s doing anything about it.

Watch the following video of a coyote hound hunter in Wisconsin pushing his dogs to harass and terrify a defenseless coyote.

I turned this video over to a Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources  Conservation Warden.  The warden did a full investigation and turned it over to the District Attorney as a case for animal cruelty. District Attorney, Doug Drexler, in Florence County, Wisconsin, (715-528-3362), refuses to pursue any legal charges against the perpetrators. Also, he has not returned my phone call.

 

 Now I ask you, why isn’t Law enforcement prosecuting?
You already know.

Running of the Hounds, Nowhere to Hide in the North Woods

Here lies OSCAR killed by bear  Sept. 22, 1984 and is proof that dogs die while hunting bear. I took the featured photo while out tracking wolves two weeks ago. Bear claws are hollow and filled with bacteria, and if a dog  isn’t out right killed by the bear, the infection from the wounds will finish the job.

Bear hunters would have you believe they are saving your life by sending in dogs to chase bears. How? By educating the bear with hound hunting dogs.

“When you take away the use of the hounds, you take away the opportunity to educate those bears to what is known as aversion conditioning,” explained Josh Brones, the Government Affairs Coordinator for the United States Sportsmen’s Alliance.” Quote is from KRCRTV

This couldn’t be further from the truth. Bears are scared of dogs already. Even a toy poodle scares them off.

Bear hounders start feeding bears sweat treats starting in April. How is this sporting?

Baiting a wild animal so they will stick around long enough for  the hunter to get a kill shot.

The American Dentist who killed Cecil the beloved lion used bait to lure him out of a protected reserve. Then shot him with an arrow and left him to suffer. This inhumane act caused outrage by millions of people demanding his killer be extradicted and tried.

Yet, here in Wisconsin it is common practice to bait a bear with Cheerios to lure them in for a kill shot (but it is not legal to accually shoot the bear over a bait pile). It is common knowledge that  bears love sweats.

I will remind you that, it is not just wild bears hunted with packs of hunting dogs. Bobcats, coyotes and wolves are hound hunted.

If wolves are removed from the Endangered Species List they will be hunted with hound dogs.  Wolf hound hunts took place in 2013 and 2014 in Wisconsin. Packs of dogs engaged wolves in bloody fights and hounders bragged about it amonst themselves within their own twisted circles (confirmed by a reliable source).

Wildlife in Wisconsin is harassed ten months out of the year.

Wild bears in WI are tracked and trailed with packs of radio collared hound hunting dogs. How is it sporting? Hound handlers are often miles away from the chase sitting in their vehicles or sitting at the neighborhood tavern.

I’ve been out in the woods many times late into the night on wolf howl surveys and have heard lost hounds baying. Where are their handlers? Nowhere in sight.

Does Wisconsin condone the hounding of wildlife? It is all legal.  Even the grusome act of penning is legal here.

Captive wildlife, is brought in over state lines into Wisconsin for the purpose  of entertainment. Oh but, they call it education,  it is mutilating & torturing captive wildlife by dogs in training. In a fenced in pen with grown men watching.  It is called penning and it is all legal in Wisconsin.

Featured Image Copyright by Rachel Tilseth 

Warning the following video is grusome but it is a reality that is happening in Wisconsin. From penning facilty where hound dogs are set lose on fox and coyote

What can you do?

Call your elected representatives and express your outrage that this is legal in Wisconsin.