Tag Archives: grey wolf

People & Wolves Film Project Starts Filming Summer 2022

Starts Filming Summer 2022 with Dr. Jane Goodall,  Adrian Wydeven, Marvin DeFoe and Peter David

The film will explain what led to the most controversial hunt in the guise of a lawsuit. A conservative advocacy group of hunters felt that not holding the mandated wolf hunt violated their rights. Unfortunately for wolves, they won their case. Previously NRB had voted to have the hunt in the fall of 2021. The film will show how fast things progressed after the January 2021 federal delisting. During the court-ordered February 2021 hunt, more than 200 wolves were harvested as hunters quickly went over the quota, shutting down the hunt after just three days. This hastily put-together hunt angered Wisconsinites, and it caused a black eye on the state’s environmental record. In the film,  Adrian Wydeven will inform the viewer about how the hunt affected the health of the wolf population. 

Movie Review: “The Wolf and the Lion”

The Wolf and the Lion” in theaters February 4, 2022.

A wolf pup and a lost lion cub are rescued by a girl in the heart of the Canadian wilderness. Their friendship will change their lives forever.

Film plot: A headstrong music student from New York who attends her grandfather’s funeral on a remote Canadian island and unexpectedly discovers a lost lion cub who had been destined for the Vancouver circus, before also rescuing an endangered, female wolf who is being pursued by researchers. At Alma’s cabin, the wolf gives birth to a single cub, Mozart, who immediately bonds with the rescued lion cub, Dreamer. The wolf mother is soon captured and Alma is left to tend to the babies. But their world soon collapses as Mozart and Dreamer are captured and separated, and must embark on a treacherous journey to be reunited as Alma also searches for them.

Staring Molly Kunz and Graham Greene

Release date: February 4, 2022 (USA), Director: Gilles de Maistre, Producers: Gilles de Maistre, Jacques Perrin, Catherine Camborde, Valentine Perrin, Claude Léger, Jonathan Vanger, Nicolas Elghozi, Sylvain Proulx, Screenplay: Gilles de Maistre, Prune de Maistre, Story by: Gilles de Maistre, Prune de Maistre

Animal Stars trained at Instinct, Animals For Film

An Unlikely Friendship. An Incredible Adventure.

“The Wolf and the Lion is a glimmer of hope! I’m looking forward to seeing this film because it’s been a rough year for America’s wild grey wolf and those allies that fight passionately for them.” Rachel Tilseth, author at Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin

“Everyone in the world needs in these dark times a dream of hope, a fairy tale that brings light back into the hearts of those who care for wild animals and Nature. We hope to see the film soon in Italy too!” Brunella Pernigotti, author at Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin

This film could not come at a better time. Stories like these serve to remind us of our shared existence which is at once a responsibility and a privilege. No doubt, the Wolf and the Lion will bring some much needed hope to us all! —
Manish N. Bhatt, Esq., author at Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin

Coexistence Holiday: Let’s take the first path before us and howl a chorus or two together.

To hear those howls a singing away
A howl here and a howl over there
Come on, it’s lovely weather for a howl with you.

Photograph credit John E Marriott

Outside the snow is falling
And families are calling “Howl Howl”
Come on, it’s lovely weather for a howl with you.

Awoo-yip awoo-yip let’s howl
Let’s roll in the snow
We’re running in a wonderland of snow.

Awoo-yip awoo-yip it’s grand
Just nuzzling your nose
Were running along with the sounds
Of a wintry forestland.

Our thick fur coats are nice and warm
And comfy are we
We’re snuggled up together like two wolves
With the whole pack.

Let’s take the first path before us
And howl a chorus or two
Come on, it’s lovely weather for a howl with you.

Wolf Country. Photograph credit Rachel Tilseth

There’s a Birthday party at our friends Farmer Gray
It’ll be the perfect ending of a perfect day
We’ll be Howlng the songs we love to howl
Without a single stop
At the fireplace while we watch the chestnuts pop
Pop pop pop.

There’s a happy feeling nothing in the world can buy
When they pass around the blueberries and pie
It’ll nearly be like a picture print of coexistence
From a long time past

These wonderful things are the things
We remember from the first time we shared man’s fireplace
In ancient times long ago.

Have a Howling Good Holiday Season from All of us at Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin!

Poem adapted by Rachel Tilseth from the original song “Winter Wonderland” 1934 by Bregman, Vocco and Conn

Federal judge sets October 29 hearing in Ojibwe tribes’ effort to halt Wisconsin wolf hunt

Wisconsin Tribes Seek Court Order to Stop November Wolf Hunt

October 1, 2021 Six Ojibwe tribes file motion for preliminary injunction against the state

Madison, WI—EarthJustice is back in court today on behalf of six Ojibwe tribes seeking a preliminary injunction to stop Wisconsin from holding a wolf hunt in November. The motion asks the judge to hold a hearing before the planned hunt slated to begin on Nov. 6.

This motion is part of the tribes’ lawsuit filed Sept. 21 in the Western District of Wisconsin against the state claiming the proposed hunt violates the tribes’ treaty rights. The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board approved a quota of 300 wolves, ignoring the recommendations of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and willfully acting to nullify the Ojibwe Tribes’ share of wolves which the tribes seek to protect. Even the lower quota of 130 wolves recommended by the Department has no grounding in sound biological principles because, in developing the recommended quota, the Department failed to obtain a population estimate of the Wisconsin wolves that are remaining after a rushed hunt held in February.

During that three-day hunt, non-Indian hunters killed at least 218 wolves, including all of the Ojibwe tribes’ share in violation of the tribes’ treaty rights. Neither the Board nor the Department has made any changes to the management of the hunt to prevent a repeat of February’s disastrous overkill of wolves. Scientists estimate that a third of all wolves in Wisconsin have been killed since federal delisting.

THE FOLLOWING ARE STATEMENTS FROM EARTHJUSTICE AND TRIBAL REPRESENTATIVES FROM THEIR DECLARATIONS FOR THE COURT:

“This case is about Wisconsin’s responsibility to protect and conserve the natural resources we all share,” said Gussie Lord, managing attorney of Earthjustice’s Tribal Partnerships program. “The Ojibwe’s treaty rights guarantee them the ability to coexist with the natural world in the way that they believe is appropriate and necessary to sustain the future generations. Wisconsin does not have exclusive rights here. The state has set the stage for yet another violation of the Ojibwe’s treaty rights and we are asking the Court to step in and prevent that from happening.”

“Our treaties represent a way of life for our tribal people. Eroding and disregarding our treaties is unacceptable. We view violations of our treaty rights as hostile actions against our tribal sovereignty and the very lives of tribal people.” – From the declarationof Mike Wiggins, Jr., Chairman, Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

“What happens to ma’iingan happens to Anishinaabe. What happens to the wolf happens to humanity. That is universal law. The ecosystem is all connected. That is the message the ma’iingan is giving to humanity.  Look at what we are facing today — the fish are dying, the trees are dying, the climate is changing, the water is drying up.  Look at what is going on with the earth — what is taking place. I believe ma’iingan is saying — pay attention.” – From the declaration of Marvin DeFoe, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

“The wolves are part of the ecosystem. The deer herds in Wisconsin are infected with Chronic Wasting Disease. When the wolves see the herd, they take the weak animals to try to keep the herd strong. We need strong deer herds, we need the body of the waawaashkeshi, to feed our families.” – From the declaration of Robert VanZile, Chairman, Sokaogon Chippewa Community.

“The Ojibwe that hunt, fish and gather, we take and give back. We are supposed to be looking out for the next seven generations. I try to do that by teaching my grandsons to just take what they need to survive. We teach our children this — when we know it is wrong to hunt, we do not hunt. We take a step back and assess the damage. We determine how we can help so we can have the animals, the plants, the fish, for our future.” – From the declaration of John Johnson, Sr., President, Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

Earthjustice represents the tribal nations Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, the Sokaogon Chippewa Community, and St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin.

The Ojibwe word for “wolf” is ma’iingan, for “white-tailed deer” is “waawaashkeshi,” and the word to describe the people of the Great Lakes region connected to this culture is Anishinaabe

Continue reading Federal judge sets October 29 hearing in Ojibwe tribes’ effort to halt Wisconsin wolf hunt

Listen to the recording of Monday Night’s Show: WORT Radio’ Access Hour of Wisconsin’s Thirty-First Wolf Awareness Week Show

Rachel Tilseth, the author of Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, hosted this week’s Access Hour. She was joined by Alexander Vaeth this past Monday, October 11th at 07:00 PM on WORT Radio’ Access Hour, where they hosted an in-depth conversation about Wisconsin’s Thirty-First Wolf Awareness Week (WAW) with special guests Adrian Wydeven; who led the Wisconsin DNR Wolf Recovery Program from 1990 through 2013, and Peter David; a wildlife biologist with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.

In 1990, Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson signed the proclamation of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week (WAW), a time to celebrate these important animals, by highlighting the threats to their survival, spread the word about what you can do to help wolves stay protected, and help humans learn to live alongside them.

WORT Radio’ Access Hour Presents: Wisconsin’s Thirty-First Wolf Awareness Week, Monday October 11th, at 7:00 PM

I’m Rachel Tilseth, author of Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin inviting you to join Alexander Vaeth and myself, Monday, October 11th at 07:00 PM on WORT Radio’ Access Hour , where we will be hosting an in-depth conversation about Wisconsin’s Thirty-First Wolf Awareness Week (WAW) with special guests Adrian Wydeven; who led the Wisconsin DNR Wolf Recovery Program from 1990 through 2013, and Peter David; a wildlife biologist with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. www.wortfm.org

To commemorate Wolf Awareness Week, the Timber Wolf Alliance creates an annual poster featuring an award-winning artist’s rendering of a wolf or wolves in their natural habitat.

In 1990, Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson signed the proclamation of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week (WAW), a time to celebrate these important animals, by highlighting the threats to their survival, spread the word about what you can do to help wolves stay protected, and help humans learn to live alongside them.

SPECIAL GUESTS

Adrian grew up in northeast Wisconsin, and has a BS in biology and wildlife management from University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (1976), and an MS in wildlife ecology from Iowa State University (1979). Photograph courtesy of Adrian Wydeven.

Special Guest Adrian Wydeven grew up in northeast Wisconsin, and has a BS in biology and wildlife management from University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (1976), and an MS in wildlife ecology from Iowa State University (1979). His master’s research was on the ecology and food habitat of elk in the Wind Cave National Park, SD. He worked as a wildlife manager in Missouri and Wisconsin from 1980-1990. Adrian headed up the state gray wolf recovery and conservation program for Wisconsin from 1990 through 2013, while also working with other rare mammals and wildlife. He retired from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in 2015 after nearly 33 years. Adrian continues to be actively involved in wolf surveys and conservation through the Timber Wolf Alliance and Wisconsin Green Fire.

Peter David assists GLIFWC’s member tribes in the implementation of their off-reservation, treaty-reserved rights.

WAW is an opportunity to celebrate all we have learned about wolves and their place in the world, especially here in the Midwest. It is also a reminder of how far we have yet to go to educate those who resist an understanding of wolves that science and the traditional ecological knowledge provides.

Peter David

Special guest Peter David is a wildlife biologist with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, where he assists GLIFWC’s member tribes in the implementation of their off-reservation, treaty-reserved rights. He received his education (bachelors and masters in Wildlife Ecology) from UW-Madison, and from the tribal elders and members for whom he has worked for the last 35 years. At the Commission, he has had the opportunity to steward resources as varied as wild rice and wolves.

HOSTS

Alexander Vaeth, photograph courtesy of Alexander Vaeth.

Special guest host Alexander Vaeth of People & Wolves Talk Show. Alex is a volunteer wolf tracker with the Wisconsin DNR, and a Spanish teacher by training. He completed his graduate studies in Spanish at Middlebury’s language schools in Vermont, USA, Madrid, Spain, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, and volunteers as a medical interpreter in the city’s community clinic. Alex spends nearly all his free time in the woods tracking and monitoring wildlife with remote cameras and is also keenly interested in wolf advocacy and research.

Producer & Host Rachel Tilseth is a freelance writer, fine artist, educator, and environmentalist. Tilseth has been a Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Volunteer Winter Wolf Tracker since the year 2000. Tilseth worked with the Wisconsin Wolf Recovery Program as a volunteer since 1998, and as a result learned about the lives of wild gray wolves. Tilseth worked to draw attention to the plight of Gray wolves during the three years Wisconsin held wolf hunts. Rachel is founder and owner of Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin. Tilseth received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Art Education in 1992 from UW-Stout, graduating with cum laude honors.

Timber Wolf Alliance Wisconsin’s Wolf Awareness Week Events

October 19

Drawing Wolves with Artist Sarah Nelson

7:00 pm–8:30 pmOctober 20

The Art and Science of Tracking

9:00 am–10:00 amOctober 20

Drawing Wolves with Artist Sarah Nelson

7:00 pm–8:30 pmOctober 21

Citizen Science, Wolf Conservation, and Coexistence

6:15 pm–8:15 pmOctober 23

Virtual Wolf Ecology Workshop

9:00 am–4:30 pm

Tune in on Monday, October 11th at 07:00 PM on WORT Radio’ Access Hour, where we will be hosting an in-depth conversation about Wisconsin’s Thirty-First Wolf Awareness Week (WAW) with special guests Adrian Wydeven; who led the Wisconsin DNR Wolf Recovery Program from 1990 through 2013, and Peter David; a wildlife biologist with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. www.wortfm.org

Commentary: Killing is Not the Only Choice for Gray Wolf Management

I am posting a commentary By CHARLIE RASMUSSEN, communications director for the Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC), because it makes perfect sense when considering how the tribes Honor their obligations towards the Natural Resources of Wisconsin. I’m going to post the last paragraph of Rasmussen’s commentary first because it’s the perfect lead for the post:

“Looking ahead to this November ma’iingan season, Ojibwe bands have declared one-half, or 50% of the wolf quota established by the NRB. Wisconsin DNR officials must also account for the 99-wolf overkill that occurred in the runaway February season. The sum of 99 should be subtracted from the state’s share of wolves after the tribal declaration. When clerical errors have resulted in walleye overages by Ojibwe spearfishers, lakes are closed to harvest the following season to account for the overage. Tribal managers account for their mistakes. It’s well past time the state takes on a similar level of accountability.”

The following is the full commentary By CHARLIE RASMUSSEN:

In setting a 300-kill quota, the Natural Resources Board disregarded wishes from tribes and conservationists, and recommendations from the DNR experts.

Six months after Wisconsin wolf packs were left reeling from an unprecedented recreational hunt during the animals’ vulnerable breeding season, state officials are pushing forward plans to kill hundreds more wolves in 2021.

At its August meeting, a lame-duck-lead majority of the Wisconsin Natural Resources Board (NRB) made clear that its decision to set the wolf quota at 300 had nothing to do with science or stewardship.  Collaboration with Ojibwe bands is absent here as well—an affront to federal court decisions that make up the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Indians v. Wisconsin, or “Voigt” case, which requires the state to coordinate management with tribes in the 1837 and 1842 Ceded Territories.

Wisconsin wolves lost protection under the Endangered Species Act on January 4, 2021. Then, in late February the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) presided over a chaotic wolf hunt in which recreationists killed nearly 100 extra wolves, soaring past a quota limit set at 119 animals. The unprecedented hunt with hounds during the wolf breeding season was so deadly that it had to be shut down after only three days. Fresh snowfalls made for efficient hunting as many tag-holders used dog packs to run down wolves, some of whom were pregnant, across wolf range in the state.

Now, despite calls from Ojibwe tribes to back away from yet another 2021 ma’iingan (Ojibwe Anishinaabe word for “wolf”) kill, as well as advice from Wisconsin DNR biologists to set a more moderate fall quota, the NRB demonstrated that its illegitimate holdover majority is bent on driving down the state’s wolf population. At a meeting in Milwaukee, members of the board scoffed at the state’s own scientific experts for recommending a 130-wolf quota. The board even went so far as to consider a kill goal as high as 504 before settling on 300 wolves. Faced with a science-based analysis, the NRB stumbled through talking points about the need to move the population toward a non-existent population goal in a 22-year old management plan, in order to manipulate the quota. Denying the tribes their share of a science-based quota—thereby undermining Ojibwe bands’ treaty rights—appeared to be a priority.

Killing is not the only choice when it comes to managing a quota of natural resources. Each sovereign entity, whether tribal or otherwise, decides how its share is used.  While the DNR Board may struggle to comprehend this judicious use, it’s a precept the DNR, the agency, understands. For Ojibwe bands, the current sovereign decision is that the best use of wolves comes in the form of live animals, on the land, helping to enhance and maintain healthy ecosystems upon which the tribes depend.  

Looking ahead to this November ma’iingan season, Ojibwe bands have declared one-half, or 50% of the wolf quota established by the NRB. Wisconsin DNR officials must also account for the 99-wolf overkill that occurred in the runaway February season. The sum of 99 should be subtracted from the state’s share of wolves after the tribal declaration. When clerical errors have resulted in walleye overages by Ojibwe spearfishers, lakes are closed to harvest the following season to account for the overage. Tribal managers account for their mistakes. It’s well past time the state takes on a similar level of accountability. 

The Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission is an intertribal agency comprised of 11 Ojibwe bands in Wisconsin, Upper Michigan, and Minnesota. GLIFWC works with member bands to both manage and preserve off-reservation treaty reserved resources. Please visit www.glifwc.org for more information.

Charlie Rasmussen

Charlie Rasmussen As communications director for the Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC), Rasmussen works to help the intertribal agency’s 11 Ojibwe bands manage and preserve off-reservation treaty-reserved resources in Wisconsin, Upper Michigan, and Minnesota.

*Image of gray wolf credit Snapshot Wisconsin

Perché il lupo?

Canis lupus italicus, cuccioli che guardano – Foto di Antonio Iannibelli

Perché il lupo? Questa è la domanda che mi sento rivolgere più spesso da chi mi conosce e si stupisce che improvvisamente mi stia occupando di lupi. In effetti insegno inglese e la mia vita si era orientata verso altre mete dopo aver cercato inutilmente il modo di studiare e di laurearmi in una materia, l’Etologia, che a Torino nel 1980 ancora risuonava come una stramberia dei figli dei fiori. Ma certe cose “fanno giri immensi e poi ritornano”, così passati molti anni, e dopo che Milla morì – una meticcia molto simile a un lupo nonché il mio spirito guida per 10 anni – a partire dal 2013 iniziai a fare ricerche antropologiche e naturalistiche, per comprendere il comportamento di queste magiche creature che, nel frattempo, erano tornate a popolare i boschi di casa mia, in Val di Susa.

C’e’ Solo una donna nella lotta per educare il pubbico sui lupi. Potra’ educarvi. Producer Rachel Tilseth. Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin News Media.

Da allora, più mi addentro nello studio dei lupi, più mi rendo conto che il legame atavico che ci lega è costituito da elementi molto più profondi e insiti nelle nostre nature così simili e parallele. I lupi sono il nostro alter ego, sono lo specchio in cui gli uomini si vedono e ritrovano le proprie radici, nel bene e nel male. La nostra società tende a disconnetterci dalla natura e dalle sue leggi, illudendoci di poter controllare ogni cosa sulla terra, sotto i mari, nel cielo. La storia umana ha sempre e solo preso e consumato la Terra, il lupo ora rappresenta un evidente ostacolo ed è qui per dirci: Basta!

L’immagine distorta che abbiamo di queste creature è dovuta a molti fattori, antichi e moderni. Noi l’abbiamo dimenticato, ma ci sono popolazioni ancora fortemente legate alla Terra, che rispettano le sue creature per ciò che esse ci insegnano. Il lupo ci ha insegnato non solo le tecniche della caccia, ma anche le strategie di accerchiamento, carica e attacco, utilizzate poi dagli uomini nelle guerre. Ora la domanda che mi spinge a indagare è: perché manteniamo nei confronti di questa specie un rapporto così difficile e contraddittorio? I lupi sono predatori, ritenuti dall’uomo piuttosto pericolosi, ma non abbastanza da riverirli ed elevarli al rango dei più nobili (sempre secondo una valutazione umana) felini quali il leone o la tigre. Ci strappiamo le vesti se un cacciatore uccide un leone nella lontana Africa, ma lasciamo che a casa nostra vengano cacciati, seviziati, o avvelenati i più importanti predatori rimasti, quelli all’apice del perfetto meccanismo trofico naturale delle nostre regioni. Perché? Pensiamo forse che i lupi siano dei cani venuti su male? Per quale motivo ci arroghiamo il diritto di giudicarli invece di accettarli semplicemente? Vorremmo forse cancellare con loro quella parte selvaggia che vediamo in noi stessi? …

Domande aperte. Ma ripeto, di una cosa sono certa: che siamo disconnessi, staccati dalle nostre stesse radici, per cui non ci rendiamo più conto che il mondo che abbiamo creato sta precipitando in una voragine piena di plastica e inquinanti, dove non esistono più gli habitat ritenuti naturali, non solo per il resto delle creature, ma anche per noi stessi. Ricreare degli ambienti in cui regni la natura libera e incontaminata è un regalo che dovremmo fare a noi e alle future generazioni. Ogni creatura ha un suo ruolo nell’ecosistema, che noi lo vogliamo oppure no. Purtroppo abbiamo già perso migliaia di specie che si sono estinte per colpa nostra, perché non sappiamo cambiare atteggiamento e crediamo di essere dalla parte della ragione, quando in realtà non ci rendiamo conto che diventiamo più poveri, (e più malati), ogni volta che abbattiamo una pianta, che un bosco sparisce, che uccidiamo senza motivo una creatura vivente. Jane Goodall ci invita a considerare i lupi, e gli altri animali, come esseri senzienti, che sono capaci di provare gioia, dolore, paura, amore. E io penso: come noi, i lupi sono affettuosi e, all’interno del loro branco, si prendono cura gli uni degli altri; anche loro sono competitivi e territoriali, perciò difendono i propri confini, arrivando ad attaccare e uccidere se altri lupi estranei minacciano le loro terre; infine devono sfamarsi e nutrire la loro prole e per procacciarsi il cibo usano le armi di cui sono dotati: zanne, forza fisica, ma anche tanta intelligenza e flessibilità. Non mi sembrano poi tante le differenze rispetto al comportamento umano.

Indubbiamente la presenza del lupo è scomoda e in Europa, dove ormai il territorio naturale è stato quasi completamente modificato e addomesticato, questo problema è particolarmente sentito, però la soluzione non può essere il tentativo di eradicarli, cancellandoli dalla faccia della Terra. Il semplice buon senso ci dovrebbe suggerire che così facendo, creeremmo nell’ecosistema un pericoloso vuoto che potrebbe essere immediatamente colmato da un’altra specie o che potrebbe portare ad una perdita importante di equilibrio e di bilanciamento del “sistema natura”. Quindi ci si deve impegnare a cambiare atteggiamento, a cercare di dialogare con tutte le parti in causa, mettendo da parte i pregiudizi e le prese di posizione. Arroccarsi nella convinzione di essere dalla parte della ragione e pretendere che siano gli “altri” a dover cambiare opinione non porterà da nessuna parte. Ci vogliono volontà, umiltà e apertura mentale, per incontrarsi, guardarsi negli occhi, tenendo presente che ogni persona conta e può fare la differenza: chi ha il coraggio di cambiare, cambia il mondo. Solo un approccio empatico, intelligente e saggio ci aiuterà a trovare insieme una soluzione che porti alla convivenza pacifica di tutte le creature. Amo infine ricordare che ogni lupo è un individuo, con una sua storia, anche se spesso non c’è nessuno a raccontarla. Le loro sono storie di eroi senza medaglie, di difficoltà e rischi, di chilometri percorsi, di coraggio, di morte e di speranza. Storie di amore, di saggezza atavica, di nascondigli, di aria e di stelle ululate, storie magiche da leggere nel profondo dei loro occhi. Facciamo in modo che la fiamma verde, quella che Aldo Leopold vide in quello sguardo, non si estingua.
Brunella

Wolf Management: Can Wisconsin get it right this time around?

First, do no harm as a commitment to prioritising non-invasive approaches in conservation research and practice,… One of the guiding principles of Compassionate Conservation

Photograph credit John E Marriott

That’s the million dollar question many Wisconsinites are asking. Will Wisconsin get it right this time around? The grey wolf was officially off the Endangered Species List on January 4, 2021 and pro hunt legislators and hunters began the push to re-establish a recreational wolf hunt in February 2021! Thankfully Wisconsin’s tribes spoke up for thier brother “Ma’iingan” the wolf and the Natural Resources Board voted NO to an early February wolf hunt.

The following is from NPR article on today’s NRB hearing.

Board member Marcy West questioned whether a hunt would be worth risking the state’s relationships with tribes and other organizations, as well as state management of the wolf. 

“I just really have a concern that we have to prove right now that the state is credible in managing the population,” said West. 

Much of the concern discussed by the board revolved around the state’s obligations to Wisconsin tribes.

Representatives of the Red Cliff, Menominee, Lac Courte Oreilles, Bad River and Lac du Flambeau tribes urged the board not to hold a wolf hunt this winter. Several referenced a 1983 court ruling known as the Voigt Decision that affirms tribal rights to hunt, fish and gather in ceded territory under treaties with the federal government. Under the ruling, the state must consult with tribes on natural resource management.

“In making any decision about wolves, the department must abide by the requirements to consult and collaborate with the tribes as set forth in court decisions and agreements,” said Mic Isham, executive administrator with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Tribal officials said the hunt would have a detrimental impact on the wolf population in Wisconsin. Tribal members, including Red Cliff tribal elder Marvin Defoe, said they view the wolf as a brother and that the animal is significant to their cultural and religious practices. 

Individuals matter in conservation research and practice, not merely as units of species and populations, and should be treated with compassion both in the wild… —Compassionate Conservation Ethics. Born Free Foundation

Watch the Wisconsin’s DNR Natural Resources Board special meeting. This is the webcast of the January 22, 2021 special meeting of the Natural Resources Board. To the right are links to this month’s Board agenda and the Board website. Below is a list of each item on this month’s agenda. To view the webcast for a specific agenda item, click on the text for that item, then scroll up if needed and click the X in the upper right corner. The Natural Resources Board and Department of Natural Resources are committed to serving people with disabilities. If you need Board information in an alternative format, please email or call: Laurie J. Ross, Board Liaison Laurie.Ross@wisconsin.gov 608.267.7420 — Read on dnrmedia.wi.gov/main/Play/731c92f70bb84be69b8f69ef1ccbb99c1d

Wolf recovery in Wisconsin began in the late 1970s, and after almost forty years, is still ruled by aggressive hunting conservation policies of; kill-them-to-conserve-them.

“Increasing human tolerance of large carnivores may be the best way to save these species from extinction,” said co-researcher William Ripple…Also, more large protected areas are urgently needed for large carnivore conservation.”

Just how bad is it?  

Six of the world’s large carnivores have lost more than 90% of their historic range, according to a study, BBC News. The research, published in Royal Society Open Science, was carried out by Christopher Wolf and William Ripple of Oregon State University. Range Contractions of the World’s Large Carnivores. Victor, a tiger freed from a poacher’s snare by WCS and government response team specialists, is released back into the wild. Photo by John Goodrich, WCS. Siberian Tiger Project. The researchers say re-wilding programmes will be most successful in regions with low human population density, little livestock, and limited agriculture. Additionally, regions with large networks of protected areas and favourable human attitudes toward carnivores are better suited for such schemes.”Increasing human tolerance of large carnivores may be the best way to save these species from extinction,” said co-researcher William Ripple.

Grey wolves were hunted in 2013 by the use of dogs. Wisconsin is the only state the allows hunters to track and trail wolves with dogs.

“Also, more large protected areas are urgently needed for large carnivore conservation.” When policy is favourable, carnivores may naturally return to parts of their historic ranges. BBC News

Wisconsin’s political-atmosphere regarding favourable policy is lacking; even down-right-hostile in its management of wolves. 

In Wisconsin, there are roughly around 1000 wild wolves sharing the landscape with people in the northern & central forest areas. Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association (WBA) continues to push for a trophy hunting of wolves. In 2015 WBA worked at Loosening regulations for bear hunters using dogs in pursuit of bear. Because of that change it’s impossible to know; just how many dogs in pursuit of bear are running through the woods.

During the 2016 Wisconsin bear hunting season 37 hunting dogs were lost in the pursuit of bear. In 2017 $99, 400.00 was paid for hounds killed in pursuit of bear, 2016 training & Hunting season, according to the Wisconsin annual wolf depredations payout summary. Did the Wisconsin wolf depredation program reimburse bear hunters who knowingly ran their hunting dogs through WDNR wolf caution areas

Considering the decades of conflict between bear hunters and wolves; is this becoming harassment of an endangered species. Isn’t this illegal? Especially when they are listed as an endangered species?

In January 4, 2021 the Grey wolf became officially off the ESL. Delisting of Wisconsin’s wild wolf means certain death for this iconic predator, as Wisconsin is the only state that allows hunters to use unleashed packs of dogs to hunt wolves. Wolf hounding fact sheet.

Fresh off the ESL Wisconsin’s grey wolf was brutally hunted , trapped and chased down by wolf hunter’s dogs in 2012-2014 until a federal judge ordered them back on the list.

Conservation of large carnivores over the last century has been one of: kill-them-to-conserve ethic. An example of this conservation policy Wisconsin law, 2011 Wisconsin Act 169; “If the wolf is not listed on the federal endangered list and is not listed on the state endangered list, the department shall allow the hunting and trapping of wolves and shall regulate such hunting and trapping as provided in this section and shall implement a wolf management plan. In regulating wolf hunting and trapping, the department may limit the number of wolf hunters and trappers and the number of wolves that may be taken by issuing wolf harvesting licenses.”

Wisconsin’s large carnivores are being aggressively managed through hunting policies that are impacting black bears. In a research paper “Consumption of intentional food subsidies by a hunted carnivore” Human food subsidies make up more than 40% of the diet of bears in northern Wisconsin. This consumption of human food subsidies, baiting, is negatively impacting the black bear population in Wisconsin. An estimated four million gallons of bait is dropped in Wisconsin’s forests by bear hunters starting in April through mid September.

A young black bear cub at a hunter’s bait.

The researchers found that: “Female consumption of high caloric food subsidies can increase fecundity (the ability to produce an abundance of offspring or new growth; fertility), and can train cubs to seek bear baits. Long-term supplementation can increase a population above its ecological carrying capacity. Further, Wisconsin, humans are influencing the ecosystem not only through top-down forces via hunting, but also through bottom-up forces by subsidizing the food base. Researcers’ findings emphasize the need to understand what effects conservation and management strategies that feature human subsidies can have on wildlife, particularly how they alter behavior, population sizes, and demographic parameters.” 

Wisconsin, humans are influencing the ecosystem not only through top-down forces via hunting…

One of the pro wolf hunt legislators pushing to re-establish the hunt was interviewed in a Wisconsin Public Television Show in 2010 regarding conflict between bear hunters and wolves

Is it possible to move conservation policy from a killing to conserve to a compassionate ethic? There’s a movement towards compassionate conservation that I hope Wisconsin can adopt. Compassionate conservation policy developed by Born Free Foundation “Guiding principles; First, do no harm as a commitment to prioritising non-invasive approaches in conservation research and practice, and an acknowledgement that invasive interventions may harm individuals, populations, and ecosystems. Individuals matter in conservation research and practice, not merely as units of species and populations, and should be treated with compassion both in the wild and in captivity Valuing all wildlife as worthy of conservation effort, whether native or introduced, whether common or rare, and regardless of perceived usefulness to humans.” 2017 Compassionate Conservation Convention is Being held in Sydney, Australia on November 20-24, 2017.

Wolf recovery in Wisconsin began in the late 1970s, and after almost forty years, is still ruled by aggressive hunting conservation policies of; kill-them-to-conserve-them.  Isn’t it time for Wisconsin’s wolf management plan to move forward into a new age; that supports increasing human tolerance of large carnivores. 

Trophic Cascades are powerful indirect interactions that can control entire ecosystems. Trophic cascades occur when predators limit the density and/or behavior of their prey and thereby enhance survival of the next lower trophic level.

Preview – Ma’iingan: Brother Wolf

This new film from Wisconsin Public Television captures enduring spiritual connections with Brother Wolf, the lasting bonds and responsibilities shared between native people and the wolf species, and the opportunities and challenges presented by the reintroduction and protection of the animals across reservation lands. Click here to view film on PBS website

According to The Revelator here’s what the Biden Administration could do to restore Grey Wolf protections…

NPS Wolf Image

By December 2020 (the following is an excerpt from the Revelator)

How to Restore Federal Protections

The Biden administration could begin ensuring protection of wolves through three initial actions.

First it should reverse the recent decision to delist gray wolves. The incoming secretary of the Interior could easily and immediately withdraw the rule in order to settle the inevitable lawsuit(s) that will challenge the legality of the delisting.

Second it should put all gray wolves in the lower 48 states under Endangered Species Act protection once again. The entire history of federal wolf protection has been piecemeal and fractured. Defining numerous different “distinct population” segments and pursuing delisting on a region-by-region or state-by-state manner does not facilitate full wolf recovery throughout their historic range; it only results in significant numbers of wolves being shot and trapped, and repeated challenges in court.

Third, once all gray wolves are again under the full protection of the Act, the administration should have the Fish and Wildlife Service finally develop a comprehensive nationwide gray wolf recovery plan. This plan is required under the Act but has never been made. The gray wolf was first protected way back in 1974; the Service has had more than 40 years to complete such a plan. It is long overdue. Once the recovery plan is completed, the Biden administration should have the Service implement it and monitor the results of the implementation. These actions will go a long way toward ensuring the recovery and long-term survival of gray wolves in the lower 48 states.

As one of North America’s most iconic and ecologically important species, gray wolves can and should represent the very best of our conservation efforts and science. This will benefit not just wolves, but all other threatened species in the United States. President-elect Joe Biden has the power to make that a reality.

The opinions expressed above are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The Revelator, the Center for Biological Diversity or their employees.

Reposted with permission from The Revelator.

“Ally of the Grey Wolf”

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