“Wolf Spirit” Screens at the Twin Cities Film Festival Sunday October 20th.

“Wolf Spirit” screens at the Twin Cities Film Festival in the Documentary Shorts Block: Persistence and Vision on Sunday October 20th at 05:00 PM To Purchase Tickets Click Here

Friends of the wolf Jim Brandenburg, Larry Stillday (Chi Ma’iingan) and Barry Babcock all who have spent most of their lives in wolf country are featured in the film.

“Wolf Spirit” Minnesota Premiere at the Twin Cities Film Festival Sunday October 20th. Photograph by renowned National Geographic Photographer Jim Brandenburg.

“Wolf Spirit is dedicated to the memory of Chi Ma’iingan a spiritual teacher of mine from Red Lake Nation and to the wolves of northern Minnesota.” Julia Huffman, Producer and Director

“Wolf Spirit” screens at the Twin Cities Film Festival Documentary Film Shorts (Shorts Block) on Sunday October 20th at 5pm!

Purchase Tickets here: https://www.showplaceicon.com/Browsing/Movies/Details/h-HO00002753

Wolf Spirit is Endorsed by Dr. Jane Goodall:

“BEAUTIFULLY and sensitively filmed with commentary from people who not only admire but understand the role of the wolf in the American landscape. A film that needs to be watched by as many people as possible right now in the face of the horrifying and inhumane slaughter of wolves supported by State Wildlife Services and the US government’s Senate and House of Representatives.”

A Message from “Wolf Spirit” Producer and Director Julia Huffman

Jim Brandenburg was able to attend the screening and here’s what he had to say…

Women & Advocacy…

Julia Huffman is the producer and director of the award winning documentaries Medicine of the Wolf and Wolf Spirit. This interview is from July 2016.

Julia can you tell the readers where you grew up?
I grew up in Southern West Virginia with a few years living in “Philly”, Philadelphia.

 Can you tell us about a childhood memory that helped create who you’ve become now?

My parents “dropped out” of living in the city, when I was very young and joined a “back to the land movement.”  They really re created themselves and didn’t follow the norm of mainstream society. This influenced me deeply. I developed a close connection to the land and to animals growing up in the hills and hollers of WVA. Nature is my base. I am interested in finding new ways to do and say things in this life time and my parents really taught me by their example to be true to that inner voice.

 Can you tell us about a person in your life that inspired you?

Jane Fonda. Beautiful spirit inside and out. An incredible activist and honest. I think we dismiss honesty at times In our culture, but she always struck me as someone who doesn’t apologize for who she is, but can admit openly she made a mistake. We all do. But the humility it takes to be out In the public eye and work on the many environmental issues she has over the years and then also say, “I missed the mark there”, to me, takes incredible courage.

People don’t realize how many years this woman has been using her voice, money and celebrity to speak out for women, human rights, Indigenous rights, and environment… It goes on and on. And lastly she is actually a bit shy by nature, but does it anyway, because she believes in it, I relate to this!

 Can you tell us a little about your post high school studies and why you chose them?

 I got a degree in broadcast journalism, at Bethany College in West Virginia.  I wanted to be a news reporter at one time.

 Can you tell us about a person that helped develop your creative artistic side?

 So many. At a point in my life, I learned, finally, to ask for help and I have been blessed to have found several amazing mentors over the years.

One of my latest is actress Sheryl Lee. She really liked the film and we found each other through a mutual friend. I always thought her work was very cerebral and magnetic and so we had this mutual admiration, which is a good starting place. She is incredibly generous with her talent and time. She is a teacher by nature. She has shared gems of wisdom with me and supported and inspired me to be true to my creative and ever evolving intuition.

 You chose wolves as the subject of your award winning documentary Medicine of the Wolf. Can you tell us what led you to that choice?

 I have always loved wolves. My connection to them, like many, is through my first dog Bozo, he was my soul mate. You’ve heard the term, “the wolf is in your living room? Well Bozo was my “wolf.”

My film was really this amazing opportunity for me to learn more about the dog’s wild cousin, the wolf, right along with the viewer, I really went on that journey.

Medicine of the Wolf Trailer

As a director can you tell us what was the most challenging segment to film in Medicine of the Wolf?

 All of it…ha ha. I call myself, “Me myself and I Productions”..

I say that with a smile, there are S0 many people who donated time energy, money love…into making it! And it certainly IS a WE film. But I bit off a huge chunk in wearing most of the hats. And I am grateful; it’s the doing that makes us learn.

 But maybe the pain was the hardest. The wolf hunt was happening when we were making it and I felt like the whole time I was sprinting (and I was) I had this crazy notion that I needed to save them…And I, we, do. And it took a toll.

 As a director can you tell us what was the most rewarding segment to film in Medicine of the a Wolf?

 I loved ALL of it truly. But being with Jim and my amazing crew up in Wolf country, in Ravenwood for several shoots was MAGICAL, it gets under your skin, the beauty and rawness of that country. And all that Jim shared and gave and revealed in the film was the biggest gift and life changing experience, I truly cherish and admire Jim so very much, he is one of my teachers.

 Can you tell us how has the making of the film Medicine of the Wolf touched you spiritually?

…..It changed me. I am fairly quiet about this, as I believe now that some of what we experience in life is sacred.

Chi Ma’’iingan, Larry Stillday who is in the film and has since passed, shared with me, that the Medicine of the Wolf is love, this I know now on a core level.

 Can you tell us how the overall production of Medicine of the Wolf enhanced your professional career?

New opportunities.

Well. I was invited to do a TEDx talk in Fargo, My talk is on the Healing power of Wolves, so that is a big honor..I have traveled all over now with the film, many seem to really like it. Maybe I am recognized more now as a director. I think as women, there are still a very low percentage of us getting our projects seen and so I am honored to help carry that torch for us.

 Now let’s talk wolves. Can you tell us why you think the topic of wolves drives such fear and hate in some people?

I think that the wolf issue in many ways represents a mirror into our own selves; meaning they remind us of our capacity to love deeply and hate deeply.

And just like the political battles and the bashing you see around us now, many humans seem to need to vilify something.

The wolf in my mind in certain circles has become a scapegoat of misplaced anger and resentment.

 Can you tell us what about the wolf inspires you? Why do you champion him?

The wolf has given so much, just by being. The film was a thank you for all that they have done for the planet and for us humans.

You’ve chosen the topic of Celebrating the wolf for your Ted Talk; can you tell us why you chose that topic?

We have been so programmed to believe that wolves are bad and evil, its everywhere in the news…ISIS attackers are labeled ”Lone wolves” The Wolf of Wallstreet…etc etc etc.

And anti wolf groups continue to spread propaganda about wolves that is incredibly destructive.

So my intention is to speak only of the wolf in the positive and celebratory way that they rightly deserve. I believe that words and ideas…can change hearts and minds. We’ll see! J

Julia’s Ted Talk

Final question. Can you tell us what’s next for you? 

Rest. Maybe a dramatic feature film…

You can meet Julia Huffman on Saturday August 24th, The Center Theatre for more information go to the Facebook event page by clicking here.

Wolf Spirit Trailer

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Highlights from Wisconsin’s premiere night of “Medicine of the Wolf” in Madison…

…produced and direct by Julia Huffman. On Wednesday night the Barrymore theatre’s box office line was all the way down the block. 


A big thank you to the panel members for making this a notable celebration of Wisconsin’s Wolf Awareness Week. 

Pictured: panel members, standing (left to right) Robert Mann, Patricia McConnell, Carl Anderson (emcee), & Randy Jurewicz. Seated (left to right) Barry Babcock, Rachel Tilseth (sponsor & organizer) & Melissa Tedrowe (sponsor & panelist).

Panel members; HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedrowe; certified animal behaviorist Patricia McConnell, Ph.D.; Robert Mann, Ho-Chunk Nation Elder; Woodsman, environmentalist and author, Barry Babcock (who appears in the film); Randy Jurewicz, retired Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Wolf Program Administrator, and emcee Carl Anderson.

There was a Q&A after the screening.
The panel members connected very well with the audience! This connection was evident in several ways; audience questions & comments, audience laughter, and keeping the audience’s attention for almost an hour’s time. This was a wonderful tribute to Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week!

Pictured: Barry Babcock & Ian Whalan

Thank you to the Barrymore theatre for their continued support and for the full page ads they put out; Barrymore management, and staff for all your hard work in making the Wisconsin premiere of Medicine of the Wolf a success.

Thank you to WORT Eighty Nine FM Community Radio in Madison, Wisconsin for their promotion work that contributed to the success of this screening.

Audience at screening of “Medicine of the Wolf” at the historic Barrymore theatre in Madison Wisconsin on Wednesday October 19, 2016

Thank you to Ned Gannon for graciously lending your artistic talents by designing the “Keep The Wild” commemorative posters. Thank you Timothy Coburn for your generous support for funding the poster printing. Thank you Andy Reich for the graphic design work on the event invitation.

Thank you to Andrea Thalasinos for supporting the event with her novel “Fly By Night” along with Mystery to Me Bookstore’s advertising they would be selling books at the event.

Pictured: Barry Babcock, Ian Whalan & Andrea Thalasinos

 
Thank you to Barry Babcock & Andrea Thalasinos for donating their books for the raffle. Thank you Foxlights inventor, Ian Whalan, for supporting non lethal management of wolves with an informative booth at the screening.

Pictured Kevin Knipfer & Timothy Coburn

Thank you to our volunteers Mandy Mortimer, Kevin Knipfer, and LuAnn O’Dell.

Pictured: Julia Huffman

Special thank you goes out to Julia Huffman for the making of this remarkable film, and for donating signed DVDs for the raffle.

Thank you Humane Society of the United States for sponsoring the screening. 

Pictured: Volunteer Mandy Mortimer photobombing Wisconsin HSUS state director Melissa Tedrowe

Here’s how you can view Medicine of the Wolf either online or purchase your copy http://www.medicineofthewolf.com

Learning to live with predators

A Wisconsin premiere of “Medicine of the Wolf” explores ecological significance

by Craig Johnson Source: The Isthmus 

October 13, 2016

Why are we afraid of the big, bad wolf? Is it because they kill so much livestock, or steal our babies? Or is it because they have been vilified for centuries in every manner of media from folk tales to blog posts?
Julia Huffman’s award-winning documentary, Medicine of the Wolf, explores the lives of wolves in Minnesota, their place in the ecosystem, their relationship with humans and the continued smear campaign against the predators.
It includes footage shot by National Geographic photographer Jim Brandenburg, and will screen at the Barrymore Theatre Oct. 19 as part of Wolf Awareness Week. The 7 p.m. screening will be followed by a panel discussion with wolf experts and advocates, including Robert Mann, an elder from the Ho-Chunk Nation, and Randy Jurewicz, former wolf administrator for the state Department of Natural Resources.
Wolves once ranged throughout the lower 48 states, but by the late 20th century they could only be found in northern Minnesota. After decades of protection and management, their range expanded to more than 10 states, and they were removed from the endangered species list. Here in Wisconsin, 528 wolves were “harvested” from the north from 2012 until 2014, when a federal court ruling put wolves back on the endangered list.
“A forest with wolves is a healthy forest,” says environmentalist and author Barry Babcock, who appears in the film and will speak on the panel. Babcock says wolves spark a “eutrophic cascade,” which influences plants and animals throughout the wilderness: Wolves cull the deer population, which means the deer don’t eat as much foliage; more foliage means a greater variety of herbivores are sustained, which leads to a greater variety of small predators and scavengers (eagles, foxes, weasels, etc).
Despite their beneficial effects, the vilification continues, with propaganda fueled by exaggerated tales of wolves killing livestock. Now, the push is on in various states, including Wisconsin, to allow wolf hunting again. Sometimes the hatred crosses into the irrational. Animal behaviorist and panelist Patricia McConnell says she heard “one hunter in Northern Wisconsin say he liked to kill wolves in as painful a way as possible, because ‘they are evil.’” The truth is that incidents of wolves attacking humans are about as common as them blowing over pigs’ houses.
Huffman and the panelists hope that Medicine of the Wolf will help turn society’s mistrust and hatred for wolves into a respectful partnership. Learning to share the world with wolves would not only improve their lives, but our own as well.

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Featured Image Jim Brandenburg 

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Purchase tickets here: http://www.barrymorelive.com/tickets/1610194.html

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Wolf Awareness Week event: Wisconsin’s premiere of the award-winning documentary film “Medicine of the Wolf.”

The Humane Society of the United States, (HSUS), and Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin present in celebration of Wolf Awareness Week the Wisconsin premiere of the award-winning documentary film “Medicine of the Wolf.”
Produced and directed by Julia Huffman, the showing will take place on Wednesday October 19, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Barrymore Theatre, 2090 Atwood Ave, Madison, WI, 53704.

In 1991 Governor Tommy Thompson proclaimed this week – Sunday October 16th through Saturday October 22nd – as Timber Wolf Awareness Week in Wisconsin.

Reserve your tickets Tickets are $10.00 advance/$12.00 day of show.

Advance tickets are only available on-line at: http://www.barrymorelive.com/tickets/1610194.html or by phone at (608) 241-8633. 

After the screening there will be a panel discussion and Q&A with:
HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedrowe; certified animal behaviorist Patricia McConnell, Ph.D.; Robert Mann, Ho-Chunk Nation Elder; Woodsman, environmentalist and author,Barry Babcock (who appears in the film); Randy Jurewicz, retired Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Wolf Program Administrator, and emcee Carl Anderson.

Wolves are part of Wisconsin’s wild heritage.

Medicine of the Wolf trailer

250 Commemorative posters will be given away at the screening 

This is the official commemorative poster for the Wisconsin premiere screening of Medicine of the Wolf taking place in Madison Wisconsin. These masterfully designed commemorative posters by artist Ned Gannon http://bit.ly/2aDsrRO Commemorative posters will be given away at the event by our donor Timothy Jon Coburn.  

About the film 

In this beautiful and important documentary, filmmaker Julia Huffman travels to Minnesota and into wolf country to pursue the deep intrinsic value of perhaps the most unjustly maligned animal on the face of the planet. Medicine of the Wolf focuses on these extraordinary sentient creatures and the remarkable, world-renowned National Geographic photographer Jim Brandenburg who has photographed and studied wolves for 45 years—longer than anyone in history. As our guide, Brandenburg enables us to see the world of the wolf as we have never seen it before. Documented with stunning cinematography of the Northern Minnesota landscape “wolf country”, Medicine of the Wolf tugs at the emotions while presenting the complexities and highly charged politics now surrounding an animal being pushed towards extinction. 

The following is what Dr. Jane Goodall has to say about the film ‘Medicine of the Wolf’ “The sound of wolves howling under the stars is for me one of the most haunting and beautiful of nature’s voices. Native Americans revered wolves for their wildness, courage, and loyalty. Today science respects them for the important role they play in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. And countless numbers of the general public are fascinated by them. Yet the myth of fierce and dangerous beasts, handed down from early white settlers, informs much of the horrific and unjustified cruelty and persecution that wolves faces today. Medicine of the Wolf explores the facts. It is powerful, informative and moving, and as I watched I was first enchanted and then enraged. I urge you to watch this compelling and courageous film and tell everyone you know to watch it as well. Thank you, Julia Huffman for making it.” Review by Dr. Jane Goodall

Let’s send a clear message that; wolves are part of Wisconsin’s wild heritage! Wolf advocates join us on October 19th for the Wisconsin premiere of Medicine of the wolf. Get tickets here: http://bit.ly/24FDUkL



Listen Wort Radio http://www.wortfm.org/  to win Medicine of the Wolf Wisconsin premiere tickets.

Announcing the Wisconsin premiere of the award winning documentary film “Medicine of the Wolf” October 19 at 7 pm in Madison 

 Does Bonnie Raitt know something about the Wisconsin Premiere of the award winning documentary Medicine of the Wolf? The answer is yes! Look at the photo of her Focebook post. 

Did you know that Bonnie Raitt along with other celebrities are doing phenomenal awareness & fund raising for wolves through the GUACAMOLE FUND: click HERE to learn more about Guacamole Fund

You’re invited 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.

The Humane Society of the United States and Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin presents In celebration of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week

The Wisconsin Premiere of the award winning documentary film Medicine of the Wolf  Produced and Directed by Julia Huffman

After the screening there will be a panel discussion and Q&A with:

HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedrowe; certified animal behaviorist Patricia McConnell, Ph.D.; Robert Mann – Ho-Chunk Nation Elder; woodsman, environmentalist and author,Barry Babcock (who appears in the film); Randy Jurewicz, retired WI DNR Wolf Program Administrator, and emcee Carl Anderson.

Tickets: click on the following link: http://bit.ly/24FDUkL

$10.00 Advance/$12.00 Day Of Show

Advance tickets only available on-line and by phone at (608) 241-8633.

  
Wisconsin don’t miss this premiere screening of Medicine of the Wolf during Wolf Awareness Week on October 19th at 7 pm in Madison

About the following poster

This is the official commemorative poster for the MOTW screening in Madison Wisconsin and masterfully designed by artist Ned Gannon http://bit.ly/2aDsrRO 
Commemorative posters will be given away at the event by our donor Timothy Jon Coburn. Thank you Tim! 
Sponsors: Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, Medicine of the Wolf & Humane Society of the United States. 
Get Tickets: https://goo.gl/h9MgXM or call the Barrymore Theatre By phone at (608) 241-8633.

  

The following is from a post on Bonnie Raitt’s social media:

From BRHQ — Calling all supporters of wildlife in Wisconsin!  

Please support the WI premier of Medicine of the Wolf at The Barrymore Theatre on October 19th!

In this important and moving film, documentarian Julia Huffman travels to Minnesota and into wolf country to pursue the deep intrinsic value of brother wolf and our forgotten promise to him. Questioning the rationale of wolf hunts, the film features captivating testimony from world renown environmentalist and National Geographic photographer, Jim Brandenburg!

Get tickets here: http://www.barrymorelive.com/tickets/1610194.html


Medicine of the Wolf trailer

About the film

Filmmaker Julia Huffman travels to Minnesota and into wolf country to pursue the deep intrinsic value of brother wolf and our forgotten promise to him.


Medicine of the Wolf will take viewers on a journey to understand the powerful relationship that we have with the wolf by interviewing prominent people who represent the different levels of connection to this ancient and iconic species – from Ojibwe creation stories that reflect our interconnectivity to all things, to a lifetime of observations of a complex and dynamic family unit, to a wolf scientist expressing his layered findings in an over 50 year study of the delicate web that wolves weave into our ecosystem.

www.medicineofthewolf.com
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Click the following blue highlighted words to read more about the producer & director of the award winning documentary film “Medicine of the Wolf: An intimate interview with Julia Huffman
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To stay up to date on Wisconsin’s premiere of Medicine of the Wolf official page, go to: Facebook 


And thank you to www.wortfm.org radio for promoting the screening of Wisconsin’s  Premiere of Medicine of the Wolf. 

We’re A Community Resource. You’re The Community!

WORT has been a vector of communication between the individual and the community since its inception, so whatever you need to say, we have a tool or process to help you speak up. We have different tools for different entities, depending on whether you are an individual, a performer, a business or a fellow non-profit. Here are a few ideas for no-cost ways that WORT can help you get the word out about your organization and events.

Wisconsin Wolves Visit a Deer Carcass

Re-posted with permission from the author: On-TheEdge Steve Meurett-Writing with Light 

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2016
Medicine of the Wolf

Young Wolf

Yes, I borrowed the title from filmmaker Julia Hoffman’s recent film chronicling this large carnivore and the misunderstandings surrounding them. It was happenstance that I happened to watch the film February 23rd, my birthday, the same day these central forest region animals made an appearance.
 The film predominately features interviews with renown photographer Jim Brandenburg from Ely Minnesota. Brandenburg is one of my favorite photographers and his work has captured wolves from across North America, particularly ones near his home in the Boundary Waters area of northern Minnesota. The narrative from Brandenburg follows his fascination of the animal, beginning with extensive study and photographing in Ellesmere Island in northern Canada to the distressing results of the wolf hunt in northern Minnesota . The latter having a profound effect on him personally as the result of the local pack left in disarray after the killing of the alpha male and poaching. 
The film has been greatly supported by wolf advocates as a banner to their cause. I’m sure wolf haters thoroughly dismiss it. The “Big Bad Wolf” side of the story is one most of us have grown up with and for what ever reason, those feelings persist-unfounded in reality. Hoffman delves into the other side-looking at the relationships between man and wolves and the complex social life the animal has. 
A month or so ago I’d found a dead whitetail, it was frozen solid, partially buried in snow, cause of death unknown. It was a small yearling doe and few forest creatures had discovered her yet. She would not go to waste. This presented an opportunity. The county and state forests here have many carnivores, animals I’m keenly interested in and more so since starting my work in the Ho-Chunk Nation DNR. I’d been busy this winter doing tracking surveys (as a volunteer) for fox, coyote, bobcat, fisher and of course wolves. A well placed camera trap nearby could possibly capture some images of these fascinating animals. 
While coyotes are more than numerous, and bobcats and fishers are not uncommon, it’s very difficult to actually see one in the wild. I can count on one hand the number of cats I’ve ever encountered, yet sign indicates they are around. Wolves are just as difficult to get pictures of and I’d hoped to maybe get images of ones that I’d tracked the past few years. (note: the Wisconsin central forest region consists of roughly 7000 square miles in more than seven counties, and is as detailed a location I’ll share, for obvious reasons). Although I’m not actually pressing a shutter, as a photographer, I still love capturing and looking at pictures, and these could be fantastic subjects if I were lucky. 
Being in a rather open area of timber slash, the first visitors were unsurprisingly crows and ravens. I was a little taken aback by the size difference between the two species, but not of the numbers within the murder when they were there. 

raven and a crow

Other airborne patrons discovered the carcass as well- numerous Bald Eagles and even a rare (to me) Golden Eagle. I’d been aware that golden’s pass through this area but apparently this one lingered for “he” would visit the site daily. I’ve told people I never quite get tired of seeing eagles, actually raptors of any kind and some of the images that follow were thrilling.

Bald Eagle, Patient Crows

 

Golden Eagle Arrives

 
 

Guarding The Site

 

As appealing as the bird shots are, and there were hundreds, I was still most interested in carnivores, and it did take some days for them to appear. I’d expected them sooner, although the camera was apparently missing some of the action for during the sequence of images, portions of the deer would be whittled away or moved with no visible culprits.

  Canis latrans, Marking “His” kill?
Considering the number of coyotes that I record on tracking surveys, I was a bit surprised at how few actually wandered into the site. One here and there, maybe two, just once, but I suspect they were responsible for the rapid decline of most of the yearling. Disappointingly, no bobcats, fishers or wolves ventured in. I continued to return for camera checks, but quickly the scavengers had reduced the whitetail down to a spine and skull, hide and a couple legs-it was efficiently picked clean.
I returned one last time to possibly remove the camera. I was confident there would be little left to attract repeat customers. Not surprisingly, everything was gone. My first thought was that something large must have consumed the remaining scraps. No tracks indicated that however, in the melting snow. Surveying the area, drag marks into the brush disclosed the remains had been moved. It’s common for the entire animal to be consumed, nothing is wasted- bones, hide and all. Since there was something left, I moved it back to the camera and reset everything for one last try.
The wolf is neither man’s competitor nor his enemy. He is a fellow creature with whom the earth must be shared. L. David Mech
I’d be naive to think most people agree with this view by Mech, especially in the state and area I live. I do, however. Unfortunately, the mentality observed here still remains locked on Little Red Riding Hood or poor (or selfish) assumptions of barstool biologists. That said, I continue to want to understand the species and their complex social structure, which is quite unlike any other large carnivore. Study and observation is required and this opportunity to capture images can only enhance that-for me anyway.
So finally they made an appearance. The SD card had been slipped into the computer and quickly visually astonishing pictures appeared on the screen. No, these were not coyotes, not these animals cautiously appearing in front of the camera. Displaying particular behavior and posturing began to tell their story. Author and wolf biologist Dick Thiel noted nuances in the animals when I shared the pictures which identified them as most likely a breeding pair and a subordinate younger animal. My less educated eye had not deciphered those same clues when I’d first viewed the photographs. Perhaps I was just happy at first to have the quarry in front of the lens.
A mere 24 hours after I’d visited the site the wolves wandered in. Surely, deer scent had not escaped their curiosity and being that it had been a mild winter, a possible free meal would be welcome. As Thiel pointed out, the progression of images displayed a cautious younger wolf, a similarly colored confident animal and a larger light hued thick coated alpha female. In my opinion, beautiful animals. The pictures were not as clear as I’d hoped, but they finally were the evidence I’d anticipated at some point-one gets tired just looking at prints in snow and sand. [Click HERE to view all the trail cam photographs and to read the full blog]

Medicine of the Wolf, a Minnesota made film, returns home for a screening in Winona, MN

Forty-seven feature films are showing this weekend at Frozen River Film Festival  in Winona Minnesota.

 

On  February 25 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Medicine of the Wolf
Directed by Julia Huffman (74 minutes)
Appearing: Julia Huffman and special guest (Screening event information click here)
In this beautiful and important documentary, filmmaker Julia Huffman travels to Minnesota and into wolf country to pursue the deep intrinsic value of perhaps the most unjustly maligned animal on the face of the planet. Medicine of the Wolf centers on the remarkable, world-renowned National Geographic photographer Jim Brandenburg, who has photographed and studied wolves for 45 years—longer than anyone in history.
Also appearing:
Collette Adkins, Senior Attorney for Biologival Diversity, works in the Endangered Species Program, where she focuses on combating exploitation and cruel treatment of rare wildlife. She received her law degree from the University of Minnesota, where she also earned a master’s degree in wildlife conservation. Before joining the Center, Collette was in private practice, where her pro bono work focused on preservation of endangered species and their habitats. She also served as a law clerk to the Honorable John R. Tunheim in the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota.
Ticket information click here 


Medicine of the Wolf Facebook page

A day to day webdocumentary – A video journal filmed by Jim Brandenburg and directed by Laurent 

I’m a fan of Nature 365 and have the ap on my IPad.  Brandenburg and Joffrion’s daily webdocumentary present the viewer with beauty, serenity and spirituality of our natural world. I crave more of these videos and hope this series will continue in 2016.  ~Rachel

Source: 365 moments of nature, from January 1 to December 31, 2015. A video journal filmed by Jim Brandenburg and directed by Laurent Joffrion. A naturalist and poetic vision of the northern wild biotopes.

Introduction by Jim Brandenburg, wildlife photographer and filmmaker
For many years I filmed the forests around my wilderness home in the great northwoods and the wide-open prairies of my childhood. I had no particular project in mind; I simply enjoyed documenting the moods of the day and the coming and goings of the wild creatures that were almost like family to me. It became like a diary and for many years it was rare not to ‘write’ something with my camera nearly every day.

Those precious experiences and memories have now found a safe home where they can be shared with many of my friends from around the world. It surprised me how extensive this diary had become. Day by day, year after year the pages accumulated. The resulting journal found its voice. Each day a one minute impression of a unique event that I was fortunate to witness is presented. Less can be more in this case. Like a good poem, the material that is left out gives weight to what remains. Nature has blessed me with its gifts of subtle but powerful teaching. One might even describe these moments I give back as a form of a small prayer; a mindful effort to pay homage to a wild and natural living land.

There were themes that kept presenting themselves to me – like the resident wolf pack that over the years learned to trust my presence. The wolf is a recurring subject, perhaps more than any other. In their trust, secrets were revealed to my camera that were not known, even to science. Then on occasion I entered into another world and encountered a ghost from the past in the name of a Native American spirit. Those that lived a natural existence here for centuries before me have left a strong presence. I felt their presence and knew it was appropriate to include that spirit.

The seasons would usually slide into their nearly imperceptive rhythm and other times the land transformed overnight. The magic of living and embracing the grandeur of wild nature is heightened by dramatic weather changes that can leave city dwellers unbalanced. Nature has become the enemy to many. That is a dangerous condition.

I have tried to project the miracle as I saw it. A translation of the unknown gift we often don’t understand or even see. I hope the message was received and understood, better yet felt. For that I would be honored; the land and its creatures would be eternally thankful.

 Intentions by Laurent Joffrion, director
One day, Jim Brandenburg came to me with a mysterious gift. He gave me some hard drives filled with video clips that no one had ever seen. A work of several years in the northwoods and the great prairies of the Midwest, USA. His backyard at Ravenwood, where he lives, and Luverne, where he was born.
« It’s for you… he said, I don’t know what we can do with this, but perhaps we could work together ? »
An honor and a great challenge.
So I reviewed all of these videos. For hours and hours… And I found this remarkable body of work. I watched the seasons pass through the years. Spring blooms, fall colors, first snows, vast frozen horizons… I followed streams and canoed on preserved lakes; I wandered the great plains on the bison footsteps. Deep in the forest, I witnessed how the wolf pack evolved and their puppies grew; Wild orchids, migrating birds gathering, prairie dogs… I marveled at air bubbles trapped under transparent ice, at sparkling frost or morning silhouettes hiding in the fog. I contemplated northern lights, heard the loons call, slept under the stars…
For almost ten years, Jim filmed his natural environment, keeping an exclusive journal. Exceptional. These videos are remarkable as they come from a long term commitment, as they reflect a unique and poetic vision by Jim, and as they show the beauty and diversity of the great natural systems of the northern hemisphere, the boreal forest and the great plains, as they are when their wilderness is preserved. I don’t think I’ll ever have an other opportunity to work with such a body of work on a natural history subject.
Then, thinking about Jim’s previous successes such as Chased By The Light, Looking for the Summer or 93 Days of Spring, all built on the principle of one picture a day, I thought «Why don’t we present one daily video sequence, for the whole next year ? 365 original clips which, as a set, would reveal the pertinence of Jim’s documentary work. A journal; a collection of short and personal stories; an innovating web documentary offering an authentic and poetic vision of nature…»
This project, named Nature 365, was born from my connection with Jim, the discovery of his rare and precious video work, and from our common wish to share it with people. I hope that each person who will here discover this great wilderness, will appreciate it as much as I do.

Jim Brandenburg has published many bestsellers including: Chased by the Light, Looking for the Summer, Brother Wolf, White Wolf and Minnesota Images of Home. He has also published many young adult books including the National Geographic book titled Face to Face with Wolves. His movie and TV work includes filming with NHK in Japan, National Geographic Television Specials and the BBC television series “Life.” Several Brandenburg photographic exhibitions are planned in the US, Europe and Japan over the next several years.
Jim Brandenburg’s work can be seen on the web at http://www.jimbrandenburg.com or at the Brandenburg Gallery in Ely, Minnesota and Luverne, Minnesota.

About Laurent Joffrion
His passion for nature and his particular interest for the relationship that unites man with his environment inspire french director Laurent Joffrion to usually offer an optimistic vision of nature. Stories of artists who value biodiversity, stories about people committed to the preservation of their natural heritage, stories about synergies and conservation projects… His most important films have won awards at national and international festivals. Laurent Joffrion has worked with several television production companies, in France and abroad, and on the new medias by exploring innovating narrative forms. For this purpose, he created the multimedia company FollowFocus, which runs the Nature 365 channel : http://www.followfocus.fr

All images are from: Nature 365 Website

December 29, 2015 click HERE to watch the last video of the year. The following are Jim’s thoughts…

  
Once a wolf – Day 363 of 365

And thoughts…
This being the last wolf video of the year, I’d like to share some background on the continuing story of the Ravenwood wolves. The image of the wolf skull in this moment has a story with it that I felt you should hear.
Ravenwood is my home tucked in the wilds of Minnesota’s Superior National Forest. It is the area where all the wolves in Nature365 were filmed. It’s a vast wild land that contains the largest wilderness east of the Mississippi. The huge Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is just outside my door. Only two major roads between my home and the North Pole would be crossed if one went that direction. My location is just four miles from Canada.
I moved there many years ago to be close to the only small pocket of wolf population that escaped extermination and near extinction in the contiguous U.S. Wolves have roamed this land since the glaciers retreated 10,000 years ago. They have always been a crucial part of this ecosystem, and were here long before us humans and the white-tailed deer, that we love to hunt so very much. Wolves represent the wild as much as any animal I know. I needed to be close – to live with them to tell their story. For more than 35 years I’ve attempted to do just that through words and pictures. It hasn’t been easy but it certainly has been rewarding and even life changing.
When I first came to the wild Northwoods from the tamed prairie I saw the hatred for the wolf. It is not unique to Minnesota. I have seen that same fear and disgust in my travels all around the world, from Norway (one of the worst examples) to France. I only see a form of curious compassion in countries where the wolf has disappeared. That’s the way it goes – once we lose or destroy something there is often a new and fresher view and understanding. Perhaps a form of regret, and/or guilt, comes over the reflective and collective culture – a looking back.
In my studies and work with animals I have seen that the wolf is unique in how people perceive them. It is the most persecuted and misunderstood animal of them all. That is a story I expanded greatly upon in my book Brother Wolf. It is one reason I chose to spend my life with wolves and tell their story. I had thought over the years the work that some of us had done had made a difference.
I was rather startled by the attention that came my way because of the wolf connection ‘fame’. The wolf became a charismatic figure – it felt like a revolution had taken place. Movies were made like “Dances with Wolves”, hundreds of books were published and wolf centers were built like worship temples – bringing in thousands of people. I needed to retreat deeper into the forest from the rock star – like attention. At the same time I was terribly pleased to see the public’s new love for the wolf.
Then, the reality of a sad and deepening trend surfaced. The “a wolf got my deer” hunting crowd proposed a wolf hunt. Almost over night a bill was written and promoted by misguided legislators to satisfy the angry hunters and wolf haters. I never would have dreamed of such a development. The bill passed. The mystery is how it slipped by with 80% of Minnesotans opposing a wolf sport hunt. It is a complex and old sad story where misperceptions and scapegoating prevailed to achieve political ends. With resentment and competition towards wolves, it became easy to incite the willing with emotional tales that played to fears. Wolves were terrorists in our midst.
All of the wolves that you have been watching on these daily videos are gone now. I have not seen a wolf at Ravenwood in more than four years! Ever since the first wolf hunt the wolf family that I got to know so well was either shot or dispersed because of the stress because of the chaos that developed. As you have seen through the year, the wolf family is extremely closely knit. Not unlike the human family. I have seen the depression and confusion that overtakes the pack’s mood when one or two go missing. Those of you that have dogs know how they react when a prominent member of the human or dog family leaves. Same animal, with the same reaction – dogs are wolves. That’s why I have a hard time understanding the sport-killing concept.
One serious unintended (but not surprising) consequence happened once the hunt was in place. It’s rarely talked about, or even known in wolf circles. I have been in a unique position to see the profound change in a wolf pack caught up in that war… that’s what it looks and feels like to me. That consequence is that once Federal laws took protection away from the wolf and the state Department of Natural Resources allowed a hunt, it caused a kind of subtle permission to degrade the protective status or even “feeling” that wolves were off limits to kill. I know many of the wolves in my pack were killed illegally – the dam was opened and the culture gave its permission with an uncaring wink. I have heard first hand stories of local wolf haters shooting them out of season. Bragging goes on in the local bars; it’s a status thing with some (not all) in the hunting tribe – a badge of honor. One needs to live in the culture to see it. Secrets are revealed. I saw things that are lost to visitors.
Very few, if any have spent as much time as I have – living near the pack and in the midst of several generations of wolves being born and dying. I knew them all – some intimately. I hope this daily peek into my wolf world has helped some understand and see the magic of this remarkable animal. It’s a partnership that goes back 40,000 years or more when man invited the wolf into his family and then they became dogs.
The status of the wolf comes and goes in the Federal legal sense. For now they are safe in Minnesota. That will be challenged again I’m sure. If we care and value this national treasure I would encourage people to make even a small gesture to help. Howling for Wolves is a Minnesota based group that has made a huge difference in exposing the wolf’s plight. Please see their work here and contribute: http://www.howlingforwolves.org. I also am very proud to have worked with my friend Julia Huffman in making her documentary movie Medicine of the Wolf that tells the story of the hunt and reveals some intimate details of my wolf experiences at Ravenwood. One can purchase or rent the movie on iTunes or Julia’s website: http://www.medicineofthewolf.com.
There is a mix of sadness and relief in sharing this story. It has changed my life; things never remain the same – in nature and in culture. A combination of sadness and pride is also felt in seeing this year’s collection of moments end. A total of about six hours has been shown in the Nature365 series. It is at times difficult to see and comprehend how much time and effort I invested into this. When one is in love, measurements don’t matter. I was in love with my subject. I hope those that did not see all of the moments this past year will have the opportunity to view them during the next year as they will be replayed in full on this site.
Finally, my dear friends and colleagues at the editing studio in France did the incredible task of crafting each day from the hundreds of hours of video that I shot over the years. I give my deepest admiration and respect to Laurent Joffrion who conceived and directed this year’s NATURE 365 presentation. Benoit Maximos and Léo-Pol Jacquot patiently worked with Laurent and me through the year. I am indeed humbled and honored.
Jim Brandenburg

The Film Society and Minnesota Made Presents ‘Medicine of the Wolf’ at the Minneapolis Convention Center, September 10, 2015

The following is what Dr. Jane Goodall has to say about the film ‘Medicine of the Wolf’

“The sound of wolves howling under the stars is for me one of the most haunting and beautiful of nature’s voices. Native Americans

D. Jane Goodall

Dr. Jane Goodall

revered wolves for their wildness, courage, and loyalty.   Today science respects them for the important role they play in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. And countless numbers of the general public are fascinated by them.   Yet the myth of fierce and dangerous beasts, handed down from early white settlers, informs much of the  horrific and unjustified cruelty and persecution that wolves faces today. Medicine of the Wolf  explores the facts.  It is powerful, informative and moving, and as I watched I was first enchanted  and then enraged. I urge you to watch this compelling and courageous film and tell everyone you know to watch it as well.  Thank you, Julia Huffman for making it.”  Review by Dr. Jane Goodall

Don’t miss this opportunity to see the award winning film Medicine of the Wolf Directed by Julia Huffman

The Film Society and Minnesota Made presents an outdoor event at the Minneapolis Convention Center. Screening is on September 10, 2015, 8:30 pm

Medicine of the Wolf poster photograph by Jim Brandenburg with artwork by Rachael Howard

Medicine of the Wolf poster photograph by Jim Brandenburg with artwork by Rachael Howard

MN Made MSPIFF  movie at sunset, presented by the Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul The Creative City Market is a free monthly experience in the heart of our downtown that celebrates the act of making. Each month the public is invited to the Minneapolis Convention Center Plaza to participate in an evening under the setting sun surrounded by MN made art, wares, and performance.

“The famous “wolf” cover of Never Die Young led James Taylor to a long-standing relationship with environmentalist and National Geographic photographer Jim Brandenburg. In this video, he talks about making that cover happen. Unfortunately, wolf populations are once again under attack. To find out how you can help, or to provide grassroots funding for Julia Huffman’s movie about the subject, go to Medicine of the Wolf website

Starring renown Photographer Jim Brandenburg.

Starring renown Photographer Jim Brandenburg.

 

Bonnie Raitt Recommends Medicine of the Wolf

Bonnie Raitt

Bonnie Raitt

Please check Medicine of the Wolf a film that explores the spiritual, scientific, and ecological value of wolves. The main human subject of the film, Jim Brandenburg is a renowned wildlife photographer and author who has been a powerful wolf advocate for the last 30 years. In 2011, the US government lifted the Gray Wolf’s endangered species status, and since that time, hunters have killed over 1/3 of the population that was recovering since protection brought it back from the brink of extinction in the 1990s. -Bonnie Raitt

A review of Medicine of the Wolf from Jim and Jamie Dutcher

Cover.NatGEO.WOLVES_DJ_HR_0904Medicine of the Wolf is an important and deeply moving film—a must-see for anyone with an interest in wolves. It conveys both the beauty and value of the wolf while also educating viewers about the persecutions they continue to face from those who do not yet understand them. Director Julia Huffman demonstrates through example the ways in which people can make a difference for wolves. -Jim and Jamie Dutcher, Award Winning Filmmakers, and founders of the nonprofit group Living With Wolves

Julia Huffman

Julia Huffman

“We are happy to announce that Medicine of the Wolf, starring renown Photographer Jim Brandenburg, will be coming back to Minneapolis and screening at its birth home!”  Julia Huffman

Earlier this year WODCW interviewed the director,“Medicine of the Wolf” World Premiere: Interview with Film Director, Julia Huffman