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People & Wolves Talk Show Explores the Concepts of “Compassionate Conservation”

Photograph credit John E Marriott

Our next show will be all about Compassionate Conservation.
Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin believes Compassionate Conservation is the future, developed first by Born Free Foundation.
The following Compassionate Conservation concepts are from Born Free Foundation.

Our host Alexander Vaeth

First, do no harm as a commitment to prioritising non-invasive approaches in conservation research and practice, and an acknowledgement that invasive interventions may harm individuals, populations, and ecosystems.
Individuals matter in conservation research and practice, not merely as units of species and populations, and should be treated with compassion both in the wild and in captivity
Valuing all wildlife as worthy of conservation effort, whether native or introduced, whether common or rare, and regardless of perceived usefulness to humans
Peaceful coexistence with wildlife is the ultimate aim guiding compassionate conservation practices.

Continue reading People & Wolves Talk Show Explores the Concepts of “Compassionate Conservation”

Brunella Pernigotti ospiterà e parlerà con Antonio Iannibelli del suo libro “Un cuore tra i lupi”

ritratto antonio iannibelli

Stories of People  Wolves Talk Show Intervista con Antonio Iannibelli.

 

 

Brunella Pernigotti ospiterà e parlerà con Antonio del suo libro

“Un cuore tra i lupi”

Il 17 Giugno 2020, Alle ore 18:00 Ora Europea

Wolves of Douglas County News – Italian Gray Wolf Facebook Page

ad alcune pagine lette durante lo spettacolo “Il richiamo” 

 


Su “Un cuore tra i lupi”: Un giovane emigrante nato nei boschi del Parco Nazionale del Pollino porta nel cuore l’amore per la sua terra e la voglia di ritornarci. Una storia vera simile a molte altre ma qui il lupo è il filo conduttore che porta l’autore a scoprire verità sorprendenti. Per vedere i lupi devi conoscere il lupo. http://antonioiannibelli.it/un-cuore-tra-i-lupi/

Copertina Un cuore tra i lupi

English translation: About “A Heart Among the Wolves”: A young emigrant born in the woods of Pollino National Park keeps the love for his land and the desire to return in his heart. A true story similar to many others but here the wolf is the guiding thread that leads the author to discover surprising truths. If you want to see wolves, you must know the wolf. http://antonioiannibelli.it/un-cuore-tra-i-lupi/

Stories of People  Wolves Talk Show Intervista con Antonio Iannibelli.

Brunella Pernigotti ospiterà e parlerà con Antonio del suo libro

“Un cuore tra i

Il 17 Giugno 2020, Alle ore 18:00 Ora Europea

Wolves of Douglas County News – Italian Gray Wolf Facebook Page

 ad alcune pagine lette durante lo spettacolo “Il richiamo” 

Stories of People & Wolves Talk Show Host Brunella Pernigotti. Credit Brunella Pernigotti.

About Host Brunella Pernigotti 

Brunella lives in Turin, Italy. She’s a teacher, a writer and a photographer. She has published a novel and a book of tales and has to her credit about ten personal photographic exhibitions. She’s a member of the board of a no-profit association of Turin, “Tribù del Badnightcafè”, that organizes cultural and artistic events. Besides she works as a volunteer to help women who have been victim of domestic violence.

She says: “I love wolves and nature in general. Even if I’m not a biologist, I’ve been studying wolves and their problems for many years. I’ve been devoting myself to the protection of the environment and of the endangered species as far as I can do.”

Stories of People & Wolves Premieres Live from Facebook, Wednesday May 13th at 10:30 AM Central Time

Hosts: Brunella & Rachel will give updates on Italian and Wisconsin gray wolves. Brunella will be live from Italy! Rachel will be live from Wisconsin. This will be our premiere broadcast! You will get a chance to ask us questions live from Facebook. And we will reveal the quest for the next show. See you soon! To watch the show click the link on May 13th at 10:30 AM. Go to Wolves of Douglas Co WI News Media & Films Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/heartofwolfadvocacyfilmproject/videos/697641794113612/

Host Brunella Pernigotti will give a brief update on Italy’s gray wolves

Do you know where Italy is? Did you know that there are rare gray wolves existing only in Italy? Do you want to know how many wolves there were left in Italy in 1970? This is what Brunella will tell you about Italian gray wolves, and you’ll get a chance to ask her questions.

Italy consists of a 1,400km (about 860 miles) long boot-shaped peninsula extending out into the central Mediterranean Sea, together with a number of islands to the South and West. It is dominated by mountains. There are two mountain ranges: the Alps which run in the North, from West to East, and are the natural border between Italy and Northern Europe and the Apennines which run north-south through the peninsula and are like the back bone of the country. The Alpine mountain range is linked with the Apennines, so the wolves after being almost exterminated at the beginning of the twentieth century, from the 70s returned to colonize the Italian territory going up from the Apennines to the Alps. The Italian wolf was widespread in the Italian Peninsula, including Sicily, until the middle of the 19th century. The extermination of the grey wolf in Italy was not as complete as in Northern Europe, due to greater cultural tolerance of the species. It was largely extirpated in the Alps at the beginning of the 20th century and disappeared from Sicily before the Second World War. Its range along the south-central Apennines was still relatively continuous by the Fifties, though this population was reduced reaching the all-time low number of almost 100 individuals in the early 1970s.  In Italy we have a particular kind of gray wolves, they are called Canis Lupus Italicus. They particularly need to be protected because they are a rare subspecies which exists only in Italy. https://www.wwf.it/lupo/soslupo/ 

There are about 2000 wolves living here nowadays, https://www.agi.it/blog-italia/ispra/lupi_dati_censimento-4699463/post/2018-12-04/ but since Italy is densely populated, they are very elusive, so monitoring them and making an effective census is very hard. They hide into the wild as much as they can, searching for the few safe places left for them.  

You can learn more about Matteo Serafini an Italian Wolf Researcher by clicking my interview of him here: https://wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com/2019/09/21/interview-with-matteo-serafini-an-italian-wolf-researcher/

Canis lupus Italicus with summer coat. Photo by Antonio Iannibelli

Host Rachel Tilseth will give a brief update on Wisconsin’s Gray wolf

Did you know Wisconsin has more wolves than Yellowstone National Park? Wisconsin’s 2018-19 overwinter minimum wolf count was 914-978: https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/Wildlifehabitat/wolf/documents/2018-19wolfcountbrief.pdf compared to as of January 2020, there are at least 94 wolves in Yellowstone National Park. Feb 13, 2020: https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/wolves.htm

Did you know Wisconsin’s Wolf Recovery Program began in the late 1970s under the guidance of Wolf Biologist Richard P Thiel? Thiel runs Timber Wolf Information Network (TWIN) located in central Wisconsin. In 1991 Adrian Wydeven became the Head Wolf Biologist, retiring in 2014. Wydeven created a citizen volunteer wolf tracking program. Wydeven now serves on the board of Timber Wolf Alliance (TWA) out of Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin. Both non profits,TWA & TWIN, are set up to educate the public about Wisconsin’s Gray wolf. Both non profits hold Wolf Ecology Workshops throughout Wisconsin. Timber Wolf Alliance website: https://www.northland.edu/centers/soei/twa/ and Timber Wolf Information Network website: http://www.timberwolfinformation.org/

Photograph of Wisconsin gray wolves credit Snapshot Wisconsin .

Show premieres Wednesday May 13th at 10:30 AM Central Time on Wolves of Douglas Co WI News Media & Films Facebook page by clink the following link: https://www.facebook.com/heartofwolfadvocacyfilmproject/videos/697641794113612/

Host Brunella Pernigotti

About Host Brunella Pernigotti

Brunella lives in Turin, Italy. She’s a teacher, a writer and a photographer. She has published a novel and a book of tales and has to her credit about ten personal photographic exhibitions. She’s a member of the board of a no-profit association of Turin, “Tribù del Badnightcafè”, that organizes cultural and artistic events. Besides she works as a volunteer to help women who have been victim of domestic violence.

She says: “I love wolves and nature in general. Even if I’m not a biologist, I’ve been studying wolves and their problems for many years. I’ve been devoting myself to the protection of the environment and of the endangered species as far as I can do.”

Host Rachel Tilseth

About Host Rachel Tilseth

Rachel has worked with the Wisconsin Wolf Recovery Program as a volunteer since 1998, and as a result learned about the lives of wild gray wolves. Rachel has been an official Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Volunteer Winter Wolf Tracker since the year 2000. Rachel worked to draw attention to the plight of Gray wolves during the three years Wisconsin held wolf hunts. As an environmentalist Rachel has organized events, film screenings and a film festival. Rachel is working on several projects that help bring education and awareness to gray wolves in Wisconsin and around the world. Rachel received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Art Education in 1992 from UW-Stout, graduating with cum laude honors.

I believe the gray wolf is part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy! —Rachel Tilseth

Stories of People & Wolves Next Guest will be Suzanne Stone

Suzanne has worked for over three decades to restore wolves to the Rockies and Pacific Northwest.  Initially, she served as an intern for the Central Idaho Wolf Steering Committee and as a member of the 1995/1996 USA/Canadian Wolf Reintroduction team restoring wolves to Yellowstone National Park and Central Idaho.  From 1999 to 2019, she led development of Defenders of Wildlife’s wolf coexistence measures and models to minimize losses of livestock and gray wolves in the West. She is the co-founder of the Wood River Wolf Project in Idaho and has won numerous awards for her leadership in wildlife conflict resolution and coexistence including being a two time recipient of the Animal Welfare Institute’s Christine Stevens Wildlife Award for innovative research on humane, nonlethal tools and techniques for wildlife conflict management.  She is the lead author/researcher of Adaptive use of nonlethal strategies for minimizing wolf–sheep conflict in Idaho published by the Journal of Mammalogy in 2017. Suzanne helped to establish several of the nonlethal/coexistence measures to minimize conflicts between wild predators and livestock today including FoxLights, Turbofladry, range riders, wind dancers, carcass removal, use of multiple livestock guardian dogs, and more. She is working now all over the world to help transform archaic wildlife management from lethal to humane nonlethal methods. 

Wood River Wolf Project – The Wood River Wolf Project is a collaborative of conservation organizations, ranching operations, community members, and county, state and federal agencies working together to use proactive, nonlethal deterrents to minimize livestock and wolf conflicts. Since 2008, the Wood River Wolf Project has been helping Blaine County ranchers in Central Idaho implement nonlethal strategies to successfully reduce livestock losses and protect native wildlife.

Photographs

Suzanne Stone

Stories of People & Wolves Talk Show Will Be Live-streamed on Facebook

Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Media & Films (WODCW) will be livestreaming a talk show. Brunella & Rachel will be hosting a talk show “Stories of People & Wolves”.

Stories of People & Wolves talk show hosts Brunella Pernigotti and Rachel Tilseth. Show premieres on May 13, 2010 at 10:00 AM Live on Facebook.

Stories of People & Wolves Host

WODCW will bring Stories of People & Wolves to your living room premiere is set for May 13, 2020 at 10:00 AM Central Time.

Continue reading Stories of People & Wolves Talk Show Will Be Live-streamed on Facebook

“The Call” is a creative interactive project that combines dance, photography, video and theatrical narration.

The actors and writers will present a behind the scenes look at the production and answer your questions live-streamed on Facebook Sunday April 12, 2020 at 06:30 PM (Italian time).

“The call” was born from the meeting of two photographers: Paola Luciani and Antonio Iannibelli who share their love for nature and wolves. From this meeting the desire to show the wolf with different images was born, breaking the stereotypes that bind this animal to ancestral fear.

Next Sunday 12 April at 6:30 pm inviaggioconlobiettivo.it will present the the actors of the theater show “THE CALL” live on their Facebook page. They will reveal some secrets of how this project was born. And answer your questions.

A project that represents the elements of the wild that is focused on the violence against women and nature, in particular against wolves. The show was staged on November 20 at the Teatro Comunale di Sasso Marconi (Bologna) thanks to the actors, writers, directors and production by Paola Luciani, Antonio Iannibelli, Giuliano Lugli, Davide Lazzaroni, Marika Mazzetti, Kiara Aradia.

The Call is a creative interaction project that combines dance, photography, video and theatrical narration.

The aim is to create a show that regards the theme of nature, released from standardized interpretative superstructures, represented by the imagined wolf described and seen in its original condition.

The recovery of the natural element is intended as a metaphor for the liberation from the conditioned patterns and models, especially in relation to the female figure, that is still a victim of social, human and cultural influences. Women are still seen as subordinates, if not even objects, both in in the private sphere, and in the context of modern society.
A project therefore where “The Call” concept means the recovery of conscious and positive identity, against all forms of abuse and violence.

“The call” was born from the meeting of two photographers: Paola Luciani and Antonio Iannibelli who share their love for nature and wolves. From this meeting the desire to show the wolf with different images was born, breaking the stereotypes that bind this animal to ancestral fear.

Antonio Iannibelli’s photographs tell of the Italian wild wolf, who lives on the Apennine ridge and which he has observed since childhood: the teachings of his shepherd grandfather and the wild nature of the Pollino National Park made him reach a great love for wild animals, in particular the wolf. 

Paola Luciani, on the other side, pays attention to the introspective aspect of women, the freedom and awareness that they find when they can listen to their instinctive part and can follow the “call” of the she-wolf who lives in each of them.

The images mix with the dance, expertly orchestrated and conducted by Marika Mazzetti of the Sasso Marconi School of Dance Ensemble, who brings her young students to the stage. It was also an important moment to celebrate 40 years of the birth of the dance school with a show that highlights the woman in her most intimate and archetypal part.

The narrative voice is by Davide Lazzaroni who leads the spectators into the woods to meet Nature with texts of his composition.

Kiara Aradia is the model in Paola Luciani’s photographs. She has already collaborated with the photographer in the project “Candore violato” about violence against women and author of the award-winning book “My Kingdom for a horse”.

The images of the videos are by Giuliano Lugli and Antonio Iannibelli, while the graphics are entrusted to Simone Lazzaroni – Diemmedi.com
The call is a single act organized by: Danza Ensemble “Gloria Barbieri” – Paola Luciani Photographer – Provediemozioni – ItaliaWildWolf.it – Collegium Lunae.

“The Call” trailer

INTRODUCING THE PROTAGONISTS

PAOLA LUCIANI – For the seventh consecutive year Paola Luciani has staged her project for the World Day against violence against women. She has always been sensitive to these issues, this show she mixes visual arts with dance and storytelling, leading the viewer to listen and reflect on the condition of the woman and the she-wolf, a powerful, inner and sometimes forgotten archetype. Those who manage to respond to the call of the she-wolf will be able to heal themselves and to return to running free. The CALL is indeed a project of wild freedom. With Danza Ensemble “G. Barbieri” Paola had previously collaborated for her Open (h) Air project.

ANTONIO IANNIBELLI – He was born and lived in the heart of the Pollino National Park until his early teens, developing a great love for nature and animals and creating the basis for a deep knowledge of the Apennine fauna, nurturing a particular passion for the wolf. He loves to make known the importance of this animal within the ecosystem. He founded the cultural association Provediemozioni.it which deals with photography and environmental education; through the national network Italian Wild Wolf he has given voice to the many volunteers, enthusiasts and wolf scholars; in 2008 he created the Wolf Festival, a biennialevent that debates on the natural role of the wolf in Italy. He devotes part of his free time to voluntary activities in defense of the environment and biodiversity as a Voluntary Ecological Guard (GEV). His photographs and videos all have free wolves in the Italian wilderness.

KIARA ARADIA – She is performer and writer from Carrara. She took part in the project THE CALL working with Paola LucianiPhotographer in the narration of the wolf woman. It is the second consecutive year that Kiara is engaged in projects against violence against women. She is the author of the book “My Kingdom for a horse” presented last year in the project “Candore violato” which saw her starring with Paola Luciani.

MARIKA MAZZETTI – She is the choreographer of the show THE CALL. She is the Artistic Director of “Dance Ensemble – G. Barbieri” and “Studio Danza Ensemble”, so she totally dedicates her time to professional updating and to transmitting to the students, in addition to her technical perfection, her innate and engaging passion for dance. Marika has already worked with Paola Luciani on the Open (h) Air project against violence against women. The CALL was one of the appointments to celebrate the 40 years of life of her school in Sasso Marconi.

DAVIDE LAZZARONI – He is the narrative voice of the show. Reflections, words, emotions and images lead us to get to know the wolf and its partner. Davide is an Olympic and historical fencing teacher, radio host, musician and writer. For 7 years he has been the narrating voice of all Paola Luciani’s projects and has also collaborated with Danza Ensemble for the shows Inferno and the Phantom of the Opera. Although he knows how to live well between fencing halls and stage, his second home is certainly the woods.

GIUGLIANO LUGLI – He was entrusted with many images of the project THE CALL, he dealt with the editing of the digital media that are in the show. Giuliano has been working in the video production sector since 2001. He is fond of cinema, musicand visual arts and started his career in a local television, then undertook his activity as independent video maker. He has been collaborating with Paola Luciani since 2013 and participated in her many social projects.

THE STUDENTS of “Danza Ensemble” school, led by MarikaMazzetti, dance during the show THE CALL.

Translated from Italian by Brunella Pernigotti

Facebook is changing the face-of-activism.

Just how has Facebook changed activism?  I’m sure many wolf advocates can identify with the concept that awareness alone cannot further a cause. How many times have we heard that unity is the key to saving the wolf and preached by those lacking any expertise or experience in the cause they defend. Their battle cry is unity and the fights on Facebook timelines are carried on in a thinly-veiled attempt at activism. 

The following article expounds on this topic of  Three Big Problems With Facebook Activism by BY REBECCA TEICH (guest blogger) on Big Think’s blog

Many of us have fallen victim to it: changing our profile picture to those white equals signs atop a red background because someone said that it meant you support marriage equality, sharing the now-infamous #Kony2012 video that no one ever watched in full, or reposting the Huffington Post article only because the title was too witty and relevant not to.
From warring perspectives on the conflict in Gaza to the now strangely dated hashtag #bringbackourgirls, the viral social issue of the hour floods Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook with content that looks, on the outside, like deeply felt social activism. But for all the pathos running rampant over news feeds and blogging sites, there is little depth to speak of, and virtually no change afoot in the real world. “Slacktivism” online is exactly as deep as the paper-thin knowledge and commitment that fuels it.

Social Gain vs. Social Change
Social media might be said to revolutionize political activism, connecting us to like-minded peers in previously inconceivable ways. The hive is easier to stir than ever before. But these technologies have a much darker side. Facebook activism amplifies harmful underpinnings of capitalism. It drastically alters how we conceive of ourselves. And ironically, Facebook does harm to the social causes offline that we champion online. Why? Social media platforms transform social issues into cultural capital: issues become labels of political alignment and lend an appearance of social awareness attached to a digitally curated self. They become a means to the end of social gain, rather than of social change. 
Through social media, we engage in personal branding. We cultivate a name and image that we can manipulate for social gain: “likes,” retweets, comments, and shares—rather than real change on the ground—become our primary goal. We choose how we desire to be seen by others and then manipulate that artificial “self” in accord with our known, or desired, audience.

…But for all the pathos running rampant over news feeds…there is little depth to speak of, and virtually no change afoot in the real world.

No self-presentation through social media can be fully genuine. The prospect of social rewards always taints that decision-making process. Individuals cultivate their amplified selves on such platforms by sharing a given set of signifiers to attach to their “profile” through the sharing of news articles, the act of ‘liking’ pages, or re-posting other people’s writings. There is a hyper-awareness of our image in the eyes of others; whether consciously or not, our profiles become a self-promoting narrative. 
The Perils of “Slacktivism”
And the end-goal of this online “activism” is typically limited to raising awareness. As valuable as it is to widen people’s understanding of the world, no tangible change flows from awareness alone. In addition, many online activist campaigns reveal their true colors when they raise awareness of convenient untruths. 

“Slacktivism” online is exactly as deep as the paper-thin knowledge and commitment that fuels it… 

Last year we saw massive numbers of our Facebook friends change their profile pictures to a red equals sign to support marriage equality, which inadvertently served as mass-advertising for the organization that uses the emblem as its logo (with a few color changes from time to time). What these Facebook users might not care to know is that the Human Rights Committee (HRC), the organization behind the logo, has been subject to devastating criticism from the LGBTQ+ community. The HRC, Derrick Clifton writes, represents a “well-off, able-bodied, gender conforming, non-immigrant and white” audience that ignores problems of racial injustice in the LGBTQ+ community and has “a long history of throwing trans people under the bus.” Few users adopting the logo as their own profile picture had any idea they were promoting not only a political position but also a specific (an deeply flawed) organization. 
Most people jumping at the chance to use the hashtag #bringbackourgirls had little to no knowledge of the history and politics of the country in which they obliquely advocated foreign intervention. And they no clue that many Nigerians not residing in America are opposed to US intervention due to a history of the negative effects of US foreign aid and meddling there. 

Individuals craft their public selves and accompanying opinions to obtain social reward from a positive response from their followship…

These examples of “slacktivist” rebellion from current events are prevalent within social media, especially (but not exclusively) among the liberal class who claim to advocate for social justice. The irony lies in the fact that when the labels of “rebel” enters popular culture and “trendiness,” it becomes conformity. The idea of rebellion becomes another commodified modifier to one’s online self. “Rebellion” acts as a signifier to denote a sense of global awareness and a self-directed, educated position within the subject matter. Despite the appearance of rebellion in this public display of a seemingly more radical opinion, the individual is doing just the opposite. We are always keenly aware of our audience; often that audience is one of similar opinion, as that audience is comprised of “friends” or “followers.” 
Individuals craft their public selves and accompanying opinions to obtain social reward from a positive response from their followship. Social issues and critique become buzzwords or clickbait. They function as modifiers for that online public self, and lose their rebellious force. Those issues become objects used to accumulate cultural capital in exchange for social reward. In this process it becomes apparent that both the public self and the social issues become commodified to achieve an end reward that’s external to the function and existence of the commodity.
This isn’t to say that all that happens on these platforms is negative. With this new form of media and communication, there are many liberating and redeeming qualities that arise from these platforms, including the newfound ability to bridge conversational gaps and the opportunity for a larger number of people to engage in a conversation and disseminate knowledge and opinions relatively freely. Social media is fast, easy, cheap and, in one sense, democratic. 

Money Troubles

But there is the corrupting matter of money. Facebook shareholders’ bottom line is not how much social change the site inspires. No, social media sites are profit-maximizing corporations, as all those ads and “sponsored” content in our newsfeeds remind us. Social media sites, and even some social movements, should not be misunderstood as fully public. There is censorship involved, either by internal community policing or external policing from the platform to ensure a profit, making sure that voices are in line with an ideology that benefits themselves. In addition, it requires a critical eye both in terms of what we consume and what we put out because anything displayed on social media platforms is going to be mass-consumed. We must be aware of the way we, consciously or subconsciously, manipulate how we are portrayed such that it does not serve to hinder and devalue issues that require selflessness. 
We must also foster awareness for the way these platforms we engage with have profit-based agendas of their own. A blind progression into social media activism is extremely harmful. This new medium is greatly influenced by hegemonic structures that surround it and ought to be the target of critique rather than the foundation of dissemination. 
This is not a call to block off social media as an outlet for exchange. Instead, this newfound presence of hijacking the pressing issues of our time for our own personal gain requires of us to reevaluate how we get involved and participate in this new form of interaction. It’s a call to think more critically about the way information is exchanged and portrayed and to redirect activism in a direction that remains truer to its cause. 

Source: BIG THINK blog