Lawsuit argues that wolves must remain federally protected until the Fish and Wildlife Service implements a national recovery plan.

“We won’t let the Trump administration bring wolf recovery to a screeching halt to benefit the blood sport of trophy hunting,” said Collette Adkins, a Minneapolis-based Center biologist and attorney. “If successful, our lawsuit would require the feds to recover wolves nationwide and block their efforts to prematurely remove protection.”

Lawsuit Fights Trump Administration Effort to Strip Gray Wolves of Protection 

Action Seeks Legally Required National Wolf Recovery Plan

WASHINGTON— The Center for Biological Diversity today sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for violating the Endangered Species Act by never providing a comprehensive recovery plan for gray wolves nationwide, which is required by the law.

Today’s lawsuit argues that wolves must remain federally protected until the Fish and Wildlife Service implements a national recovery plan. But the agency is planning to remove endangered species protection from nearly all gray wolves in the lower 48 states through a proposed rule expected next month. 

That would make wolves vulnerable to trophy hunting and trapping, halting their progress toward recovery. 

“We won’t let the Trump administration bring wolf recovery to a screeching halt to benefit the blood sport of trophy hunting,” said Collette Adkins, a Minneapolis-based Center biologist and attorney. “If successful, our lawsuit would require the feds to recover wolves nationwide and block their efforts to prematurely remove protection.”

A recovery plan would enable wolves to establish viable populations in areas where small populations are still recovering, including California, Oregon and Washington. 

It would also promote recovery in areas like the southern Rockies, Dakotas and Adirondacks, which have suitable wolf habitat but no remaining wolf populations. 

“Wolves are still missing from more than 90 percent of their historic range in the lower 48 states, and the Endangered Species Act, and common sense tell us we can’t ignore that loss,” said Adkins. “We’re doing all we can to make sure Trump officials fulfill their obligation to restore wolves in key habitats across the country.”

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, explains that the Service unreasonably denied the Center’s formal petition requesting development of a nationwide wolf recovery plan. Beyond the plan the Endangered Species Act requires the agency to conduct a status review every five years. But six years have passed since the last national wolf status review.

For Immediate Release, November 14, 2018

Contact: Collette Adkins, (651) 955-3821, cadkins@biologicaldiversity.org

Featured photographs by John E Marriott

The Revelator, an online news and ideas initiative of the Center for Biological Diversity 

The Revelator aims to be a new voice for conservation in the 21st century. The Revelator provides investigative reporting, analysis and stories at the intersection of politics, conservation, art, culture, endangered species, climate change, economics and the future of wild species, wild places and the planet. www.therevelator.org

Coming in May

About The Revelator

The Revelator, an online news and ideas initiative of the Center for Biological Diversity, provides investigative reporting, analysis and stories at the intersection of politics, conservation, art, culture, endangered species, climate change, economics and the future of wild species, wild places and the planet.
Our aim is to:

Hold politicians and corporations accountable through incisive reporting on environmental issues;

Provide in-depth and on-the-ground understanding of the day’s conservation news;

Drive and deepen the national conversation among the public, politicians, environmental groups, scientists and academics on the important environmental issues of our age;

Pursue and promote transparency and citizen participation;

Expose wrongdoing, promote righteous efforts, illuminate dark places, stir complacent minds and hearts; and pursue the very best ideas for saving wildlife, people and the planet.

We adhere to the highest journalistic and intellectual standards and have an unapologetic love for the wild. To contact The Revelator go to www.therevelator.org 

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Featured image by Jim Brandenburg

Missing

The Shasta Pack

California’s seven gray wolves are missing, according to reports by the San Francisco Chronicle. California Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Pete Figura said the wolves, known as the Shasta Pack, could have migrated to a new region with more prey, but that it was unusual for the pack hunters to abandon their breeding grounds.
We’re reasonably confident that last year they did not use the same area as a pack as they did the year before, and we don’t know why,” Figura said. “Why they were not detected anywhere else this past summer we don’t have a clear explanation for.”
The Shasta Pack, which were the first wolf pack to live in California for nearly a century, have not been seen since May 2016. The pack was being monitored in southeastern Siskiyou County, by the CDFW and according to Figura, fresh wold tracks were spotted in late January this year, about 10 miles from the pack’s home in Siskiyou County. He said they’ve collected some scat and are currently awaiting DNA analysis to determine if it belongs to them.
“It could have been a member of the Shasta Pack or a completely different animal. We don’t know at this time,” Figura said.
The Center for Biological Diversity’s West Coast Wolf organizer Amaroq Weiss said she hoped the wolves moved on to different territory instead of being poached. Weiss said wolves in the northern Rockies had been poached in 2010, and a study found that poaching was responsible for 24 percent of wolf mortality within that region. The following year she said three family members were convicted of killing two wolves of the Lookout Pack in Washington state.
“Their poaching activities were uncovered when they tried to ship bloody wolf skins by mail to British Columbia, Canada to be tanned. They claimed to be shipping rugs but a mail clerk became suspicious when he noticed blood seeping from the package,” Weiss said. “I have no specific information to indicate the Shasta pack has been poached, however, I also have no information establishing that these wolves are still alive. (Like Figura said) it is odd that the pack has not been seen anywhere in the region of where they had previously set up a territory, den site and rendezvous sites.”
Weiss said she’s asked around and checked in with numerous people who know ranchers in the general area but no one has reported any sightings of the Shasta Pack. She said another possible outcome would be that the wolves had fallen victim to snares or poison bait traps that were used by ranchers to protect against coyotes.
“California has so few wolves. Those wolves face dire threats like intentional poaching and accidental poisoning or snaring highlights precisely why full state endangered species protections for these magnificent animals must remain in place,” Weiss said.

The Shasta Pack is believed to have killed and eaten a calf in November 2015, the first reported case of livestock predation by wolves since their return to California. That was also the last time the entire pack was known to be together. Figura said he has no evidence to suggest the wolves were killed in retaliation. Source

Feature image Shasta Pack

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Amaroq Weiss – An Insiders Guide to Advocacy -What YOU can do for wolves

 
 A Broadcast in Education Friday at 7:00 pm – Ms. Weiss will be taking your questoins at 9:00 pm live est.  Go to wolfdogradio.com  for broadcast details.

About Amaroq Weiss

Amaroq Weiss, West Coast Wolf Organizer for the Center for Biological Diversity, coordinates campaigns for the restoration and protection of wolf populations in California, Oregon and Washington, and also works to maintain protections for wolves at the federal level. A biologist and former attorney, Amaroq has worked for 19 years for wolf conservation in the Pacific West, Northern Rockies, Southwest and Alaska. She was an appointed stakeholder that helped Oregon develop its state wolf plan, and was similarly a stakeholder-advisor in California’s process to craft its state wolf plan. She has testified at state, federal and county hearings about wolves, successfully argued the administrative petition to fully protect wolves under California’s state endangered species act, and given countless public presentations about this charismatic species.
Amaroq routinely acts as ground support in wolf–related litigation and science matters for the Center for Biological Diversity, is a regularly invited speaker at the annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, given interviews on NPR radio programs including KCRW’s Which Way L.A.? with Warren Olney and KQED’s Forum with Michael Krasny; and was a panelist on the Idaho Public Television Broadcasting program, Predators in the West, which aired in five western states. She is a contributing author and editor of multiple publications including Making Room for Recovery: The Case for Maintaining Endangered Species Act Protections for America’s Wolves (2014), Social and Ecological Benefits of Restored Wolf Populations (2007), Places for Wolves (2007), Places for Grizzly Bears (2007), Livestock and Wolves: a Guide to Nonlethal Tools and Methods to Reduce Conflicts (2008), and Social and Ecological Benefits of Restored Wolf Populations (2008). She also appears in two recent documentaries about California’s first known wild wolf in 87 years, “OR7 – The Journey” and “The OR-7 Expedition.” 

 
 Amaroq holds a BS from Iowa State University, an MS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a JD from the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco. In her spare time, Amaroq enjoys urban dryland trail mushing with her two Siberian huskies, Miranda and Taiga.

About wolfdogradio.com 

Wolfdog radio was created to give those within the wolfdog community an avenue to be heard on topics that need to be addressed to highlight those that are dedicated to the Education, research and responsible rescue/placement/housing/rehoming of animals in need and to bring accurate, factual information regarding wolfdogs and wolves to it’s audience.  

Wolfdog radio has been privileged to gain access to guests thought unreachable, discussed topics that touch the heart and bring fire to one’s soul, bringing topics forth that are sometimes not easily discussed or popular to many.  
We invite you to join us on this path, to share in the enrichment and betterment of these majestic companion animals of wolf content that we are endeared by and enjoy.
Wolfdog Radio will continue to grow, will never stand still, will never be confined by borders or boundaries, we will ask when, why, how, and most importantly…what can we do to be proactive responsible citizens. 

Mission Statement – Wolfdog Radio was created to bring current, relevant, educational and legislative issues to the forefront and be a proactive voice. Our path is always changing, as are the issues and topics which we will bring to our listeners. Wolfdog Radio wishes to keep our listeners informed, entertained and be a constant reminder that YOUR voice does count!

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Featured imaged: John E Marriott

Research shows we can’t meet global climate targets without reducing meat and dairy consumption. 

Take extinction off your plate – A project of Center for Biological Diversity

  

Before You Eat, Get the Facts.
 

Ever wonder what the real cost of your food is to wildlife and our planet? Extinction Facts Labels are here to help. We’ve crunched the numbers on beef, chicken and pork so you know just how much water, wildlife and climate pollution comes with each serving.

 

We’re also arming you with the positive impact of reducing your meat consumption so that every trip to the grocery store is a chance to do right by your health and the planet.

 

The American public consumes a massive amount of meat — more than 50 billion pounds a year [1] with an average annual consumption of 55 pounds of beef, 83 pounds of chicken and 46 pounds of pork per person [2]. This enormous appetite for meat is eating away at wildlife habitats, freshwater resources and climate stability. Our planet is currently experiencing the worst extinction crisis since the loss of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, and what we put on our plates has a serious effect on wildlife, especially those already endangered and threatened.

 

Take extinction off your plate with our featured wildlife-friendly recipes. Click HERE to continue reading full article  

Wolf Wars Infographic – Center for Biological Diversity

January 25, 2016

Source: Center for Biological Diversity