In the News! New Mexico Senate backs ban on coyote-killing contests.

The Albuquerque Journal February 27, 2019 article contains good news on the National Coalition to End Wildlife Killing Contests’ effort in New Mexico.

The state Senate passed legislation Wednesday that would ban coyote-killing contests in New Mexico – after an 80-minute debate that highlighted the political divide between urban and rural lawmakers.

The bipartisan proposal, Senate Bill 76, now heads to the state House.

“This is an abhorrent fringe activity,” said Sen. Jeff Steinborn, a Las Cruces Democrat and co-sponsor of the bill.

Featured image: A coyote creeps through fresh snow in Eldorado, south of Santa Fe, earlier this month. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

Opponents said the legislation is an example of urban lawmakers failing to understand life in rural New Mexico – where, they said, killing contests should remain an option to help control the population of a predator.

“This is a perfect example of what’s wrong with our government,” Sen. Cliff Pirtle, R-Roswell, said of the proposed law.

The bill would make it illegal to organize or participate in an organized competition to kill coyotes for prizes or entertainment. People could still kill coyotes to protect life or property.

The Senate passed the bill 22-17, with a mix of Democrats and Republicans on both sides. It was co-sponsored by Steinborn and Mark Moores, R-Albuquerque.

Similar proposals have passed the Senate in previous sessions and died in the House. But voters shook up the composition of the House in last year’s general election, with Democrats picking up eight seats to reach a 46-24 majority.

In Wednesday’s debate on the Senate floor, Moores described himself as a freedom-loving Republican, but he said he was disgusted at the behavior of people who participated in a recent killing competition. They dumped the carcasses into a trailer and “drove them around town sticking it in people’s eyes,” Moores said.

On the other side, Sen. Gregg Fulfer, R-Jal, described in graphic detail how coyotes attack and kill other animals, including livestock. It isn’t right, he said, to force every part of the state to abide by one law for coyotes.

“It won’t work for my area,” he said of the proposal. “Think about how these bills are changing New Mexico’s culture.”

Coyote-killing contests are already banned on state trust land, under an executive order issued last month by newly elected State Land Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard, a Democrat. But the order doesn’t cover other public land or private property.

Supporters of the Senate legislation say 20 to 30 coyote-killing contests are sponsored each year in New Mexico. Participants use devices to “call” coyotes to lure them into range.

Under the bill, it would be a misdemeanor to organize a contest and a petty misdemeanor to participate. Source: Albuquerque Journal

In celebration of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week: A Wisconsin Premiere of “Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest” screens in Madison 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 7:00 p.m.  The Humane Society of the United States, Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, Foxlights International PTY LTD, Wolf Education & Research Center, and Plan B Foundation present – WORT 89.9 FM welcomes-

The Wisconsin Premiere of the award winning documentary film

“Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest”

Produced by Alan Lacy

Trailer: 

After the screening there will be a panel discussion and Q&A with:
Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest Producer Alan Lacy; HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedrowe; Robert Mann – Ho-Chunk Nation Elder; Foxlights Inventor & Owner Ian Whalan; Randy Jurewicz, retired WI DNR Wolf Program Administrator, and emcee Rachel Tilseth.

Tickets: $10.00 Advance/$12.00 Day Of Show

Advance tickets only available on-line at http://www.barrymorelive.com
and by phone at (608) 241-8633, with $1.00 convenience charge
http://www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com

Facebook Event site click HERE

– “BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY” –ALBUQUERQUE FILM & MUSIC EXPERIENCE, 2017

A FILM ON THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED MEXICAN GRAY WOLF

In the American Southwest, a unique species of wolf unlike any other is making a comeback. Considered extinct nearly 40 years ago, the little known Mexican gray wolf has slowly pulled back from the very brink — against all odds. From a founding population of just seven animals, this species has slowly grown to a current wild population of approximately 100, only to face a new threat from within: its own genetics. As part of a bold recovery mission, one lone wolf is given a chance to offer new hope for the survival of her species. In telling this story, narrated by Chris Morgan, “Gray Area” explores whether there can be a balanced and sustainable future where ranchers, conservationists, locals, and biologists alike can coexist with this apex predator. www.grayareathefilm.com

Wolf Awareness Week OCT 15 – 21, 2017, In 1990, Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson signed the proclamation of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week, a time to celebrate these important animals, by highlighting the threats to their survival, spread the word about what you can do to help wolves stay protected, and help humans learn to live alongside them.
our sponsors: www.planb.foundation,  www.foxlights.com, www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com, www.humanesociety.org,  www.wolfcenter.org, and www.wortfm.org.


Our commemorative poster design by Ned Gannon and will be available at the night of the screening. 

Commemorative poster design by Ned Gannon

Our panel members

Letter to the editor: Wolves belong here despite governors’ resistance

Source: The Salt Lake Tribune January 19, 2016

Whose interests are the Four Corners governors looking after in signing a compact stating they don’t want wolves in their states? Certainly not the interests of wildlife, watersheds or the majority of their human constituents.
Most ranchers believe that wolves and humans can’t live together, but wild wolves don’t attack humans (unlike grizzlies, cougars, dogs and bulls). Many organizations compensate for calf losses to wildlife.
Wilderness is the true home of wolves. Utah has a lot. Elk are overrunning ranges in southern Utah. Wolves would bring this into balance. Ecosystems long suffering from predator/prey imbalances are getting healthy again where wolves have returned, most notably along waterways, where willow, cottonwood and aspen forests are regrowing and banks are stabilizing. Wolves are a major missing biological component in our Mountain West ecosystems. We all benefit by their return.
With the governors of Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico apparently in the pocket of paranoid ranchers and other public lands users and abusers, scientists will not be allowed to orchestrate the wolf’s comeback. The guvs want more political and industry appointees to call the shots and want to dismantle the current team of world experts recommending more wolves for the Four Corners states.
Our America?
Dan Kent
Moab