Genetic Research Shows No Hybridization Between Mexican Wolves and Domestic Dogs

“This study, showing no hybridization with domestic dogs found within this population, was important because it again confirms the genetic purity of the Mexican wolf,” said Rinkevich, who is often involved in the listing and delisting of endangered and threatened species in her role as an endangered-species biologist. “That genetic information is important to conservation efforts.”

The study by Fitak, Rinkevich and Culver netted genetic data from the largest population of Mexican wolves that is now publicly available for all geneticists to use in future research. For Fitak, that might mean delving deeper into the amount of inbreeding in the Mexican wolf as the captive breeding program continues. Until then, an important question about one endangered species, the Mexican wolf, finally has been answered.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-06-genetics-purity-mexican-wolf.html#jCp

The Mexican wolf has been listed as an endangered species since 1976. Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A captive breeding program has brought the Mexican wolf from the brink of extinction to current population estimates of no fewer than 114 Mexican wolves living in the wild. The breeding of such a small population brings with it genetic…Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-06-genetics-purity-mexican-wolf.html#jCp

“Keep The Wild” 2017 Commemorative Poster Design is Finished

A Wisconsin Premiere of “Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest”  In celebration of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week,  Announces our “Keep The Wild” Commemorative Poster is finished, designed by the talented artist Ned Gannon www.nedgannon.com and will be available only at the screening – Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. In Madison at the Barrymore Theatre 

Our donor for this years “Keep The Wild” Commemorative Poster is Ian Whalan, Inventor & owner of Foxlights, Nighttime Predator Deterrent, is covering the printing costs.  http://www.foxlights.com/

Tickets: $10.00 Advance/$12.00 Day Of Show

Advance tickets only available on-line at http://www.barrymorelive.com and by phone at (608) 241-8633, with $1.00 convenience charge

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. The Humane Society of the United States, Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, Foxlights International PTY LTD, and Wolf Education & Research Center present -WORT 89.9 FM welcomes-
The Wisconsin Premiere of the award winning documentary film
“Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest”
Produced by Alan Lacy

“Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest” trailer 

After the screening there will be a panel discussion and Q&A with:

Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest Producer Alan Lacy; HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedrowe; Robert Mann – Ho-Chunk Nation Elder; Foxlights Inventor & Owner Ian Whalan; Randy Jurewicz, retired WI DNR Wolf Program Administrator, and emcee Rachel Tilseth.


Tickets: $10.00 Advance/$12.00 Day Of Show

Advance tickets only available on-line at http://www.barrymorelive.com

and by phone at (608) 241-8633, with $1.00 convenience charge

http://www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com

Please join us in Celebration of Wisconsin’s Wolf Awareness Week! 

In celebration of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week: A Wisconsin Premiere of “Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest” screens in Madison 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 7:00 p.m.  The Humane Society of the United States, Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, Foxlights International PTY LTD, Wolf Education & Research Center, and Plan B Foundation present – WORT 89.9 FM welcomes-

The Wisconsin Premiere of the award winning documentary film

“Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest”

Produced by Alan Lacy

Trailer: 

After the screening there will be a panel discussion and Q&A with:
Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest Producer Alan Lacy; HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedrowe; Robert Mann – Ho-Chunk Nation Elder; Foxlights Inventor & Owner Ian Whalan; Randy Jurewicz, retired WI DNR Wolf Program Administrator, and emcee Rachel Tilseth.

Tickets: $10.00 Advance/$12.00 Day Of Show

Advance tickets only available on-line at www.barrymorelive.com
and by phone at (608) 241-8633, with $1.00 convenience charge
www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com

Facebook Event site click HERE

– “BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY” –ALBUQUERQUE FILM & MUSIC EXPERIENCE, 2017

A FILM ON THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED MEXICAN GRAY WOLF

In the American Southwest, a unique species of wolf unlike any other is making a comeback. Considered extinct nearly 40 years ago, the little known Mexican gray wolf has slowly pulled back from the very brink — against all odds. From a founding population of just seven animals, this species has slowly grown to a current wild population of approximately 100, only to face a new threat from within: its own genetics. As part of a bold recovery mission, one lone wolf is given a chance to offer new hope for the survival of her species. In telling this story, narrated by Chris Morgan, “Gray Area” explores whether there can be a balanced and sustainable future where ranchers, conservationists, locals, and biologists alike can coexist with this apex predator. www.grayareathefilm.com

Wolf Awareness Week OCT 15 – 21, 2017, In 1990, Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson signed the proclamation of Wisconsin Wolf Awareness Week, a time to celebrate these important animals, by highlighting the threats to their survival, spread the word about what you can do to help wolves stay protected, and help humans learn to live alongside them.
our sponsors: www.planb.foundation,  www.foxlights.com, www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com, www.humanesociety.org,  www.wolfcenter.org, and www.wortfm.org.


Our commemorative poster design by Ned Gannon and will be available at the night of the screening. 

Commemorative poster design by Ned Gannon

Our panel members

“Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest” documentary film will be screened during Wisconsin’s Wolf Awareness Week

Madison wolf advocates get ready for the Wisconsin Premiere of Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest. Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin will be the principle organizer & one of the sponsors for this Wisconsin Premiere Screening being held at the historic Barrymore Theatre in Madison, Wisconsin. Exact date to be announced soon. 

Watch the following trailer:

About Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest produced by Alan Lacy

In the American Southwest, a unique species of wolf unlike any other is making a comeback. Considered extinct nearly 40 years ago, the little known Mexican gray wolf has slowly pulled back from the very brink — against all odds. From a founding population of just seven animals, this species has slowly grown to a current wild population of approximately 100, only to face a new threat from within: its own genetics. As part of a bold recovery mission, one lone wolf is given a chance to offer new hope for the survival of her species. In telling this story, narrated by Chris Morgan, “Gray Area” explores whether there can be a balanced and sustainable future where ranchers, conservationists, locals, and biologists alike can coexist with this apex predator. www.grayareafilm.com

Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest – Best Short Documentary Film Award at the Albuquerque Film & Music Experience. Pictured: producer of the film Alan Lacy.

– “BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY” –ALBUQUERQUE FILM & MUSIC EXPERIENCE, 2017

A preview of “Stories of Wolves” a film about the recovery efforts of the Mexican Gray wolf

“Stories of Wolves” by Filmmaker Elke Duerr is about the recovery efforts for our Mexican Gray Wolves, our most endangered land mammal in all of North America, our evolution of consciousness towards wild animals and our human-wild animal relationship. There only remain less than 100 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. 

Stories of Wolves trailer by filmmaker Elke Duerr

“The film has many sub-plots because of the dynamic relationship of the wolves to the various communities who now share the wolves” habitat: the ranchers, the conservationists, the Native American cultures, and the other animals who depend upon the wolves’ presence to maintain a healthy ecological system. Just as much as it is a film about wolves,

Mexican Gray wolf

it is also about the people of New Mexico, Arizona and the Northern hemisphere and our stand in keeping our wolves with us on this planet. And ultimately it is about the vanishing wildness inside and outside of us… We all belong in the Web Of Life.” -Elke Duerr Web of Life Foundation website click HERE 
“We come from love and appreciation for all the different life forms on this planet in the spirit of appreciation and interconnectedness. Our philosophy is to practice harmlessness and our photography/videography is based on obtaining consent from the animals, plants and places before entering their territory.”  -Web of Life Foundation Philosophy 

Mexican Gray wolves

“Stories of Wolves” has been released on October 28th in Santa Fe. Please check weboflifefoundation.net for details. 

Elke’s bio:

Elke Duerr

Elke is a bi-national filmmaker, lover of all things and beings wild, teacher and the founder and director of the nonprofit Web of Life Foundation W.O.L.F. She teaches and lectures widely on the importance of predators in the ecosystem and the preservation of the Web of Life, and fosters a healthy coexistence between wilderness and civilization and the reconnection of humans to the natural world. Her favorite classes are with children as she loves to debunk myths and preconceived notions about our animals and natural world and revolutionize the way we see and experience nature. Elke has published a book on human-wolf coexistence entitled: “Wolves and Humans-A new story of coexistence” in 2016.

A message about the Mexican Gray wolf from filmaker Elke Duerr

Ms. Duerr completed a short film about our endangered river otters which was screened at the New Mexico Film Festival and received the Aldo Leopold Southwest Legacy film award in the category of best adult short film for her film “Preserving Beauty”. “Stories of Wolves-The lobo returns” has received 4 awards and has been screened at various film festivals. It is distributed by Kanoy. Just recently, on October 29th 2016, Elke premiered her second documentary: “Bison Nation-Walking Sacred Sites” which has won its first award and has been accepted into film festivals. elkeduerr.com

I picked the following quote because it sums up how this film “Stories of Wolves” by filmmaker Elke Duerr reflects the truth about the plight of the Mexican Gray wolf.

“When one lives in a society where people can no longer rely on the institutions to tell them the truth, the truth must come from culture and art.” -John Trudell

Blue Wolf 2 from “Stories of Wolves” by filmmaker Elke Druerr

A book: Wolves and Humans: A new story of coexistence Paperback – April 29, 2016

by Elke E Duerr (Author) available on Amazon

Letter to the editor: Stop playing politics with the Mexican gray wolf

Source: Santa Fe New Mexican

By Melinda Kirkwood

I am writing in response to the article published on the front page of your newspaper (“Wolf pups released into N.M. wilderness,” April 30). I have a degree in wildlife biology and work with a wide range of wild species on a daily basis as my profession. I think it is very concerning that the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish wants to deny the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service the ability to reintroduce the Mexican gray wolf back into its native territory.

 State Game and Fish officials talk about procedure and permits, and of course, the “rancher” scare tactic is always an ace-in-the-hole. However, state officials have failed to mention any scientific reasoning for their denial. Based on my previous experiences with those at Game and Fish, their priorities as an organization seem more aligned with managing game species that benefit ranchers/hunters/anglers, because that, in turn, benefits the department financially.

I appreciate your newspaper publishing this article about the Mexican gray wolf pups on the front page and shedding light on this important conservation issue. I understand this can be a topic of controversy since New Mexico has a large ranching community. However, the majority of the population agrees with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision to reintroduce the gray wolf into the state.

For example, a survey conducted in the spring of 2008 by the New Mexico Legislature through an independent company (Research and Polling Inc.) revealed “69 percent of voters support the reintroduction of Mexican gray wolves into the Apache and Gila National Forests.” A more recent poll conducted by Tulchin Research in August 2013 showed that “74 percent of New Mexico voters agree there should be a science-based recovery plan” for Mexican gray wolves and “87 percent of New Mexicans and Arizonians agree that wolves are a ‘vital part of America’s wilderness and natural heritage.’” Therefore, state Game and Fish reasoning behind the disapproval of the project is not supported by public opinion.

Our voices are not being heard. It is time for that to change.

Melinda Kirkwood is a wildlife biologist and animal advocate whose goal is to help create a world where humans and animals can coexist in the natural environment.

Mexican Gray Wolf – lawsuit argued that the recovery plan is long overdue for a species that has struggled to gain a foothold in the Southwest

Source: Wildlife agency agrees to deadline for wolf plan Colorado objects to deadline By FELICIA FONSECA Associated Press Article Last Updated: Friday, April 29, 2016

  
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed to a deadline to craft a recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf after the agency was accused in federal court of dragging its feet for decades.

There are fewer Mexican gray wolves in the wild in the New Mexico and Arizona than last year. The results of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s annual survey were released in February. Enlargephoto Jim Clark/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service There are fewer Mexican gray wolves in the wild in the New Mexico and Arizona than last year. The results of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s annual survey were released in February.

The settlement filed late Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Arizona still needs to be approved by a judge, and it’s expected to be challenged by farm bureaus in three states. It would require a recovery plan to be complete by November 2017 with periodic status updates provided to parties in a lawsuit filed against the Fish and Wildlife Service.

The lawsuit argued that the recovery plan is long overdue for a species that has struggled to gain a foothold in the Southwest. The most recent annual survey released in February shows at least 97 wolves live in forested lands in southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona, a figure that marked the first decline in the population in four years.

Jeff Humphrey, a spokesman for the Fish and Wildlife Service, said Wednesday that the agency remains committed to boosting the population and improving genetic diversity. He said work on a recovery plan will shift from a team-based model to one that has Fish and Wildlife taking the lead and seeking assistance as needed to meet the deadline.

“It’s an aggressive schedule for a complex recovery equation,” he said.

Environmental groups, Arizona and Utah are on board with the settlement. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and the state of Colorado objected to the November 2017 deadline for the recovery plan that will be peer reviewed, but it agreed not to contest the settlement.

The Mexican gray wolf was added to the federal endangered species list in 1976. The first captive-bred wolves were released into the wild in 1998, with a goal of having 350 for a sustainable population, Humphrey said.

Environmentalists have been pushing for an expanded range and for more captive-bred wolves to be released in Arizona and New Mexico, but those efforts haven’t been backed by surrounding states over concerns about losing livestock to wolves and encroachment in urban areas.

Blair Dunn, an attorney representing farm bureaus in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, and other groups, said the settlement places an unfair burden on the American public when the wolves’ historical range includes much of Mexico.

“You’re creating a new range for it where it wasn’t historically and that means it’s going to have a different set of interactions with humans and livestock,” he said.

Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity said he’s hopeful the recovery plan won’t come too late.

“The Mexican gray wolf is very, very close to extinction in large part because of genetic reasons, lack of genetic diversity in the wild wolf population that is the result of years and years of mismanagement,” he said. “It may be too late but hopefully not.”

Bridging the gap between opponents and supporters to create a tolerance for the Mexican gray wolf and its population recovery.

Applications open for livestock producers on Mexican wolf ‘pay-for-presence’ program By Ken Showers 

  
GREENLEE COUNTY — The Mexican gray wolf is in the news once again as the Mexican Wolf/Livestock Council begins to accept applications for payments from livestock producers in 2016.
Launching two years ago, the Mexican Wolf/Livestock Plan reimburses qualified applications for conflicts arising from livestock and their proximity to the wolf populations.
In a news release from the U.S. Game and Fish Department, Southwest Regional Director Benjamin Tuggle said, “The Mexican Wolf/Livestock Council’s payments for wolf presence program recognizes the indirect costs to livestock producers from Mexican wolves, including stress-related weight loss in livestock and other management costs.”  Click HERE to read more

Letter to the Editor: To understand wolves, use science

Source: Arizona Daily Sun 

To the editor:
“Wolves are the only animal that kill for pleasure.” A concerned sportsman presented this belief as fact at a Game and Fish hearing dealing with the reintroduction of the Mexican gray wolf.
I have no idea what goes on in the mind of a wolf, or for that matter, others of my own species. My neighbor who lost a dozen of her chickens can only guess what was going on in the labrador’s head during the slaughter. Although, I no longer hunt, I’m not proud of the fact that recreation played a part in motivating me to kill animals. The man who holds the belief that wolves are the only animal who kill for pleasure need only look in the mirror.
The sun revolves around a 6,000- year-old flat Earth. My faith has more truth than your faith. Some races of people are inherently inferior. The only good wolf is a dead wolf.
As irrational as some beliefs might be, they provide a simple answer to complex questions. Unexamined beliefs fueled by emotions are the antithesis of scientific inquiry. Beliefs provide comfort and security. If we fail to examine our beliefs they may become an obstacle to ever overcoming ignorance and bigotry.
The concerned sportsman is not a fan of the wolf. He believes passionately that they will do harm to his interest. I may not agree with him, but I honor his right to express his opinion. If we were to examine our beliefs we might discover that science proves us both wrong. For the health of the Earth, including wolves, we are best served by science.

DAVID LASH
Flagstaff
{Featured image by Jack Bell Photography}