Tag Archives: Department of the Interior

Take Action: Close Federal Forest Land to Wolf Hunting in Wisconsin November 2021

You, as a concerned citizen, can play a key role by expressing your views to Forest Service managers to help us strike a balance and make decisions in the best interest of the public lands and the public. Contact them and express your concerns that there shouldn’t be a Wisconsin wolf hunt in the Chequamegon-Nicolette National Forest in November 2021! Close Federal Forest Land to Wolf Hunting in Wisconsin!

Click the link and fill out the form the and please share!

https://www.fs.usda.gov/about-agency/contact-us

Tell them:

Subject: Close Federal Forest Land to Wolf Hunting in Wisconsin

I would like you to close federal forest land to wolf hunting in Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board went against scientific recommendations by the Department of Natural Resources voting 5-2 for a wolf hunting quota of 300. This seriously jeopardizes gray wolf population in Wisconsin that has already suffered through a February 2021 hunt. This hunt occurred during prime breeding season and at this time there’s not enough data collected to determine how it affected wolf population. Please close Federal Forest Land to wolf hunting in Wisconsin.

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You can close Federal Forest Land to Wolf Hunting in Wisconsin by telling USDA that you want it closed because the gray wolf is a keystone predator and without them the forest ecosystem could fall apart. Fill out the form here: https://www.fs.usda.gov/about-agency/contact-us
The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest covers more than 1.5 million acres of Wisconsin’s northwoods. The Forest Service manages the land for multiple uses, including forestry, wildlife habitat, outdoor recreation, special forest products gathering, fisheries and wilderness and natural areas.
The Chequamegon side of the forest covers about 858,400 acres in Ashland, Bayfield, Sawyer, Price, Taylor and Vilas counties, while the Nicolet side of the forest covers nearly 661,400 acres in Florence, Forest, Langlade, Oconto, Oneida and Vilas counties.
Close Federal Forest Land to Wolf Hunting in Wisconsin.

NRB threatens wolf recovery. At the NRB meeting, chair Prehn and four other board members went against the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) scientific recommendations of a wolf quota of 130 and voted to up it to 300. They also voted that the DNR must get approval from the NRB if they change the 300 quota number. That move puts conservatives in the majority to control wolf hunting in November 2021. Source

Wisconsin Natural Resources Board Action on the Fall Wolf Hunt Quota

Rhinelander, WI.  Wisconsin’s Green Fire statement on August 11, 2021

On August 11, 2021, the Wisconsin Natural Resources Board (NRB) voted 5-2 to establish a quota of 300 wolves for the fall 2021 wolf hunt.
The removal of 300 wolves again this fall, on top of the removal of at least 218 wolves during the three-day February wolf hunt, could result in a population of as many as 1000 wolves being reduced by over 50 to 60% or more.

This unprecedented reduction will risk long-term damage to the viability of the wolf population. It would also be likely to trigger a review of Wisconsin’s wolf management by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and will support arguments for re-listing wolves under the federal Endangered Species Act.

Wolf biologist Adrian Wydeven, testified to the NRB Wednesday on behalf of Wisconsin’s Green Fire. Wydeven, who spent 23 years as the wolf specialist for Wisconsin DNR, offered this comment: “Removing 300 wolves in another hunt would likely have a de-stabilizing effect on almost every wolf pack in the state. There is no other wildlife species where that level of reduction would be acceptable. And it’s highly likely it would trigger a US Fish and Wildlife Service review of state management”.

Urgent Action Needed to Protect the Gray Wolf from Latest Delisting Threat…

Anti-wolf Politicians in Congress are working to delist wolves in the 48 contiguous States of the United States even going as far as preventing any judicial review of this process. These politicians are undermining the Endangered Species Act itself!

Click HERE to listen to an interview about this delisting bill.

On June 6, 2018 The U. S. House of Representatives passed a Bill: Making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, and for other purposes.

The bill contains language for delisting of Gray wolves in the lower 48 states:

…the Secretary of the Interior shall issue a rule to remove the gray wolf (Canis lupus) in each of the 48 contiguous States of the United States and the District of Columbia from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife…

The Bill calls for delisting Gray Wolves throughput the 48 contiguous States…

Reissuence of final Rules

SEC. 116. (a) The final rule published on September 10, 2012 (77 Fed. Reg. 55530) that was reinstated on March 3, 2017, by the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia (No. 14-5300) and fur-

(b) Such issuance (including this section)—

(1) shall not be subject to judicial review; and 63 ther republished on May 1, 2017 (82 Fed. Reg. 20284) that reinstates the removal of Federal protections for the gray wolf in Wyoming under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and this subsection, shall not be subject to judicial review. (b) Before the end of the 60-day period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall reissue the final rule published on December 9 28, 2011 (76 Fed. Reg. 81666), without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule. Such reissuance (including this sub-section) shall not be subject to judicial review.

Gray Wolves Range–Wide

SEC. 117. (a) Not later than the end of fiscal year 2019, and except as provided in subsection (b), the Secretary of the Interior shall issue a rule to remove the gray wolf (Canis lupus) in each of the 48 contiguous States of the United States and the District of Columbia from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in section 17.11 of title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule. 2) shall not affect the inclusion of the subspecies classified as the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) of the species gray wolf (Canis lupus) in such list.

Here’s what you can do to keep Gray wolves protected under the Endangered Species Act

Contact your members of Congress and make it known that you want Gray wolves in the United States to remain protected under the Endangered Species Act.

Members of the U.S. Congress

U.S. Senators—Get contact information for your Senators in the U.S. Senate.

U.S. Representatives—Find the website and contact information for your Representative in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Take action today to save Gray wolves!

Featured image: Offspring of Mollie’s pack in Yellowstone Park show respect to their mother and father. DAN STAHLER/Yellowstone National Park

Featured image of wolf by Ian Mcallister