Wolves are benifical for the health of Wisconsin’s forests 

…According to a study by USDA Forest Service Research & Development: Wolf Recovery and the Future of Wisconsin’s Forests: A Trophic Link

Wolves were all but eradicated in Wisconsin by the late 1960s due to over hunting. In 1974 – Gray wolf listed as endangered in the lower 48 States and Mexico.  Wolves flourished under the guidance of Wisconsin’s Wolf Recovery Program.  On Dec. 28, 2011 wolves were delisted: the Western Great Lakes DPS – Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Western Great Lakes. Politicians rushed in to designate wolves as a game species that could be hunted on 2011, Wisconsin Legislation  Act 169: if the wolf is not listed on the federal endangered list and is not listed on the state endangered list, the department shall allow the hunting and trapping of wolves.  Hunting, trapping and the barbaric use of dogs to hunt wolves began in the fall of 2012 and was abruptly halted in 2014; Due to a Federal court decision, wolves in the western Great Lakes area (including Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) were relisted under the Endangered Species Act on December 19, 2914. 

The following is from the study, “Wolf Recovery and the Future of Wisconsin’s Forests.”  Read on: 
USDA US Forest Service Research & Development  Wolf Recovery and the Future of Wisconsin’s Forests: A Trophic Link, 2010.  Wisconsin, Northern Research Station, principal investigator W. Keith Moser 

The following is a snapshot discription from the study:

“Overabundant white-tailed deer populations have serious negative effects on understory plant community structure and composition. Wolves, which are top predators of deer, have been recolonizing central Wisconsin since the early 1990s. NRS scientist Keith Moser and partners from the University of Georgia are measuring trophic cascade effects, that is, whether wolves are reducing local browse intensity by white-tailed deer and thus mitigating the biotic impoverishment of understory plant communities.”  Source

The following is a summary  from the study:

“Overabundant white-tailed deer populations have serious negative effects on understory plant community structure and composition. Wolves, which are top predators of deer, have been recolonizing central Wisconsin since the early 1990s. NRS scientist Keith Moser and partners from the University of Georgia are measuring trophic cascade effects, that is, whether wolves are reducing local browse intensity by white-tailed deer and thus mitigating the biotic impoverishment of understory plant communities. Wisconsin DNR wolf territory data combined with Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data were used to develop a landscape-level spatially explicit analysis protocol in FIA plots categorized as high wolf impact areas and low wolf impact areas. : Preliminary results suggest that seedling survival of preferred, browse- sensitive seedlings is higher in areas continuously occupied by wolf packs.” Source 

Wolves are benifical for the health of Wisconsin’s forests. It’s vital that gray wolves retain federal protection in Wisconsin. 

Here is what you can do to insure the protections of wolves in Wisconsin/Great Lakes Region and in Wyoming. Contact your congressman using this easy email link democracy.io and ask that they do not approve any riders that call for delisting of wolves. 

When wolves were introduced to Yellowstone National Park after being  absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable “trophic cascade” occurred. What is trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?  George Monbiot explains in the the following video: 



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Featured image by Jayne Belski  

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