Snaring is wildlife’s silent killer which quietly kills thousands of animals in and around Africa’s National Parks

…Advocates work to Save Zambia’s Wildlife. Rachel McRobb formed Conservation South Luangwa (Africa) the area’s largest non-profit anti-poaching and community conservation organisation ten years ago.

“I am one of those lucky people in life who finds fulfilment just being in wild places surrounded by wildlife,” says Rachel McRobb. “The possibility of losing this in Zambia is enough for me to fight the daily battles involved in running a wildlife conservation programme in Africa and managing an anti-poaching unit.”

Rachel McRobb was born in Zambia’s Copperbelt region and quickly fostered a love for Zambia’s wildlife and wild places. Spurred on by witnessing the horrors of poaching and habitat loss and with virtually no experience, training or support, Rachel has worked tirelessly to build a strong Zambian team and make CSL a key conservation organization.

To find out more visit www.tusk.org

About the trailer: Production – Spectrecom Films

Director – Chris Karageorgiou

DOP – Kieran Hodges

Snaring is wildlife’s silent killer which quietly kills thousands of animals in the Luangwa Valley annually. CSL tries to combat this by deploying regular anti-snaring patrols to remove snares from the bush and by immobilizing and rescuing snared animals. We work closely with partners including the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DPNW) and the Zambian Carnivore Program (ZCP) to achieve this.

CSL supports 65 community based scouts to help the Department of National Parks and Wildlife protect the flora and fauna of the Luangwa Valley. We do this by paying salaries, providing technical support, patrol equipment, rations, training and transport. We assist with aerial surveillance and monitoring to help detect any illegal activities including carcasses, poacher’s camps, illegal fires and drying racks.

Human Wildlife Conflict Mitigation

Communities surrounding the national park face severe crop and property damages from elephants that are unable to resist the sweet taste of maize, vegetables and fruits such as mangos. In order to mitigate this, we have a large scale human wildlife conflict mitigation program centered around the use of chilli as a mitigation measure.

Detection dogs are increasingly being used to reduce wildlife trafficking by detecting wildlife contraband. Set up in 2014 in partnership with DPNW, the CSL Detection Dog Unit was Zambia’s first sniffer dog unit that works to detect illegal wildlife products and firearms being used and smuggled within and out of Zambia.

The fight to save the planet’s wild and endangered species comes down to local communities such as; Conservation South Luangwa (Africa) the area’s largest non-profit anti-poaching and community conservation organization.

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In the U.S. there’s a war on wolves being waged around the borders of Yellowstone National Park…

Yellowstone’s wolves face trophy hunters ready to kill them as soon as they step across park boundaries. Meet the wolf advocates fighting for the legacy of Yellowstone’s wolves…

In this clip wolf advocates share their stories. Ilona Popper is a writer and advocate for wolves. Dr. Nathan Varley and Linda Thurston Wildlife biologists and business owners of The Wild Side Tours & Treks in Yellowstone National Park. Song credits: “Don’t Know Why, But They Do” Words & Music by Joe De Benedetti & Noah Hill. B roll credits thanks to National Park Service.

https://vimeo.com/264686221

A film that presents the viewer with a complete picture of what it means to advocate for an imperiled species protected within Yellowstone National Park; contrasted against an uncertain future because of wolf hunting taking place just beyond the park’s borders.

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy- The Yellowstone Story” tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Produced by Rachel Tilseth and Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth.

Ways to support this important film project.

Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story Documentary Film has a 501 3c fiscal sponsor Plan B Foundation for tax exempt contributions. You can make a donation to support the work of this vital documentary film.

The Intent Upon Killing Wolves for Trophy on Public Lands is Exploitation

The War On Wolves Continues. Wolf advocates we must make our voices heard. By Alex Krevitz, M.A. Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Science Editor

In recent years state and federal natural resource agencies have targeted grey wolves Canis lupus, for elimination.  Scientific organizations and reputable non governmental wildlife organizations have had their peer reviewed scientific research eschewed by policy makers.   Individual scientists have had aspersions cast upon their professional legitimacy for questioning wolf management policies.

The purveyors of the anti wolf misinformation have been affiliated with groups associated with extractive industries, agricultural interests and trophy hunting. Their goal has been a mission to depict wolves as wanton killers of deer and livestock. Their interests have been served by legislators whose campaigns they have funded.  Cases before the Supreme Court of the U.S. such as Citizens United and Montana Copper Kings have infused those who seek to exploit public land for private gain often at the expense of wildlife with a source of revenue with which to influence policy makers.  Fortunately, the judiciary on several occasions have restored protections to wolves. Justices have characterized the fervent and scientifically unfounded war on wolves as “arbitrary” and “irresponsible.”

Historically, over decades, Americans, in polls and on ballot initiatives,  have expressed strong support for banning wolf hunting and protecting public lands. Surreptitious attempts by extractive industries and ranchers to devastate these lands for personal gain have met with massive and vocal public opposition and some plans have been stopped or delayed.

Miraculously, persistent communications to legislators by wolf advocates resulted in the species continued protection. Numerous NGOs and grass roots activists update each other and the public on legislative maneuvers and upcoming votes. Countering large well funded and experienced entities determined to remove wolves from Endangered Species protections is an ongoing task. Certain members of Congress with hitherto positive environmental records have capitulated to their well funded cohorts with opposing agendas.

The current Interior Secretary has elevated the trophy hunting and mineral extraction as top priorities of his department. He has faced skepticism and criticism from scientists, the conservation community and the public. Naturalists at all levels  have been appalled by this single minded focus on transforming the Interior Department into  a safe haven for those intent upon killing trophy animals and exploiting natural resources on public lands as  primary objectives.

Once a species had been extirpated there is no return. The cumulative effects of killing, border walls and habitat destruction is terminal.

So the fight goes on to advocate for our wildlife who cannot protest in their own right.  To protect our sacrosanct and irreplaceable natural resources; It is imperative that severe exploitation actions be publicized, and that those who advocate for these destruction be held accountable.

We must  make our voices heard as individuals through the media, petitions, at public meetings, using our informed communications networks to rally support. We must all vote. America’s natural resources, including wolves, were protected in the past due to public support.  It is incumbent upon all of us to provide that same support for wildlife and wildlands now.

Alex Krevitz,  M.A.

Science Editor

Wolf Country

Wisconsin’s northern and central forests are home to 955 gray wolves. Wisconsin is one of about a dozen states in the country with a wild gray wolf population. Gray wolves, also referred to as timber wolves, are the largest wild members of the dog family. Wolves are social animals, living in family groups or packs. A wolf’s territory may cover 20-80 square miles, which is about one tenth the size of an average Wisconsin county. WDNR Website about wolves

The following video clip was shot in July 2017. When we got out of the vehicle a Raven began to talk to us.

The gray wolf in the western Great Lakes region is currently on the Federal Endangered Species List. This listing status limits the state of Wisconsin’s management authority including the authority to hold a trophy hunts on wolves.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. Gray wolf travels down gravel road in northern Wisconsin.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. Lichen covered trees in northern Wisconsin.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. A wolf scat in the center of the gravel road. White-tailed deer hair and bones can be seen in this wolf scat.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. Gray wolf track in mud.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. There are gravel roads in wolf habitat spanning up to nine miles with little or no signs of human development.

I filmed this video clip two summers ago.

Featured photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18 in wolf county.

Snare Traps Indiscriminate Killers, Land Mines Concealed in the Wilderness

…Snare Trap is a device concealed underground and baited with tantalizing attractive scents capable of causing great suffering for its victims. A male Timber wolf in northern Minnesota became the latest victim of a snare trap. He became caught in a snare trap meant to catch and ensnare small game. The snare meant for small game, became wrapped tightly around the muzzle of the male wolf. Can we even begin to imagine the pain and suffering that occurred as a result of this man-made killing device. How could the male wolf have known the tantalizing scents concealed a land mine known as a snare trap and set in his home range. The more an unsuspecting woodland creature tries to pull out of the device, the more the noose tightens around the body part caught in the trap. Certain death from starvation became the fate of the male wolf as the noose became tightly wrapped around his mouth. Several people saw the male wolf north of Duluth Minnesota, and tried to help.

I spoke with a volunteer at Wildwoods Wildlife Rehabilitation out of Duluth, Minnesota. They said, “several people saw the wolf and tried to help him.” The Wildwood’s volunteer told me Kelly Looby was able to get within a few feet of the wolf, a photographer, even making eye contact with him. She kept following the wolf, but he seemed very wary of humans, and disappeared and reappeared several times.

Photo courtesy of Kelly Looby

Wildwoods reported the wire snare was wrapped tight around the wolf’s nose, and embedded into the nose. He clearly could not open his mouth at all. The male wolf was very thin, as was told to them by volunteer and eyewitness Kelly Looby.

“He might have been able to lick up some snow and sniff roadkill, but he had not been able to eat,” a volunteer from Wildwoods said. “He had been starving, and was a skeleton of fur and bones.”

Photo courtesy of Kelly Looby

No one knows how long the male wolf suffered. He was first sighted near Tettegouche State Park on Lake Superior’s North Shore earlier in the week, then north of the city in Duluth Saturday February 10th. Wildwoods reported they just didn’t have the equipment needed to catch him. Many people tried to catch him but he was too fast.

In the end the Duluth police made the heart wrenching decision to put him down at 2 pm Saturday afternoon. Wildwoods was able to examine the wolf. They reported that underneath his thick winter coat he was skin and bones.

“Humans caused the initial pain and suffering of this beautiful wolf by creating the snare, and in the end taking his life to end his suffering.” said Kelly Looby.

Photo courtesy of Wildwoods

Wildwoods told me they were able to gain the equipment, a net gun, through donations after this tragedy. With this net gun they will be able to capture and treat victims of snare traps in the future.

“Snares are cruel trapping devices, causing pain, injury and death. Animals caught in snares can suffer from grotesque swelling and hemorrhaging of the head, can be hanged to death by jumping over a nearby fence or branch in a desperate attempt to escape, and can suffer from exposure, dehydration, and starvation. Snares are grossly indiscriminate, capturing any animal of the right height or size unlucky enough to pass through the snare – including pets, imperiled wildlife species, deer and raptors.” ~Melissa Tedrowe HSUS Wisconsin State Representative

Minnesota DNR Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook states the following: Snares may be used by licensed trappers for taking all species of protected wild mammals that may be taken by the use of traps. In the forest zone, snares are allowed on public land and on private land with permission of the landowner.

Take action to ban snare traps in Minnesota

Howling For Wolves Wolf Day at the Capital 2018 in 2018. Join us as we work to #StandAgainstSnaring, require permission to trap on private lands, and have a wolf hunt removed from the books once and for all.

When: Wednesday, April 11

Where: Minnesota State Capitol, Saint Paul, MN

In 2017, Howling For Wolves successfully passed legislation which approved funding for, and the establishment of, Wolf-Livestock Conflict Prevention grants administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. This program allows applicants to receive reimbursement for the cost of using nonlethal methods which protect the lives of both livestock and wolves.

In 2018, with your active prescence and actions, a ban on all wildlife snaring can become law in 2018. Join us as we work to #StandAgainstSnaring, require permission to trap on private lands, and have a wolf hunt removed from the books once and for all.

We are talking to Minnesota politicians and rallying for the wolf at the State Capitol. Our goal is to protect the wolf for future generations. This is a FREE event.

Volunteers are needed before and on Wolf Day. Write us at volunteer@howlingforwolves.org to join the pack!

RSVP here that you will attend the Wolf day. This is important for us to know you will come, so we can plan in advance.

Howling For Wolves supports current state legislation that would eliminate recreational snaring of all wildlife: House File 2160, authored by Representatives Fischer, Loon, Kunesh-Podein, Rosenthal, Ward, Slocum, Allen, Dehn, R., and Hornstein and its companion bill, Senate File 1447, authored by Senators Hoffman, Wiger, and Dibble.

“To look into the eyes of a wolf is to see your own soul – hope you like what you see.” ~Aldo Leopold

Photos used in this story courtesy of Kelly Looby and photo of dead wolf credited to Wildwoods.

Wolves are a part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy…

Wolves have an amazing olfactory sense. They will blow on the bed where a White-tailed deer slept causing all the particles to flow up and into their olfactory sense. By doing this the wolf can tell if the White-tailed deer is healthy or not. A wolf can tell if the tick that fell off the White-tailed deer has puss in the blood. Wolves can tell if a White-tailed deer has a tooth infection by smelling a chewed leaf. Wolves have kept a healthy balance in the wild for centuries. Yet, the politician claims to be the best at deciding the fate of the wolf. Stand firm, speak for wolves, because we have the moral high-ground. Wolves are a part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy. They keep the White-tailed deer healthy.

Featured image by John E Marriott

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“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story” become a valued donor…

“Tall Tales, Long Lenses: My Adventures in Photography” by John E Marriott is now available to order..

Written by John E. Marriott & Photographed by John E. Marriott and Foreword by Kelly Hrudey

John E Marriott is one of Canada’s renowned wildlife photographers

In January 1997, John E. Marriott sold his first image as a professional wildlife photographer. Twenty years later, Marriott’s Tall Tales, Long Lenses chronicles his rise as one of Canada’s renowned wildlife photographers, with a storied career that has included magazine covers, best-selling books, billboards, a Royal Canadian Mint coin, a Canada Post stamp a photography column in a national publication and a conservation-themed web series.

Guess what just arrived en masse!! 3,000 copies of Tall Tales, Long Lenses!! Direct order available at http://www.wildernessprints.com (cheaper than you-know-who in the States!).  ~John E Marriott Wildlife and Nature Photography Facebook Page

This remarkable book recounts many of Marriott’s favourite stories and photos from his most memorable wildlife encounters in some of Canada’s spectacular locales. It’s a fascinating autobiographical account of being in the right place at exactly the right times, from his on-day love affair with a pine marten to his lifelong quest to find monstrous male grizzly bears like Frank the Tank. Marriott takes you through two decades of his tallest tales and showcases many of his unforgettable images of the animals that have inspired him to become an outspoken conservation advocate. Here’s where to order your copy today. www.wildernessprints.com 

I’ve been using John E Marriott’s photographs of wolves for several years now. So it could be said that John’s photographs have helped spread education & awareness in advocating for Wisconsin’s wild wolf!  ~Rachel Tilseth Founder of Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin 

Order your copy today at http://www.wildernessprints.com 

Featured image is the cover of John E Marriott’s new book

“Deep Into Yellowstone” a new book by author Rick Lamplugh is now available 

Rick Lamplugh’s New Book Is Here: Deep into Yellowstone: A Year’s Immersion in Grandeur and Controversy is now available. There are two ways to get your copy.

Rick Lamplugh offers, “First, I would be glad to send you a signed copy. This makes a great gift for you or some other special person. You can personalize the inscription and create a one-of-a-kind gift that will be treasured. If you want a signed copy from me,”  please click this link right away: http://bit.ly/2tIEt62 Second, you can order an unsigned copy from Amazon: http://amzn.to/2tgPU3E

Here’s what pre-publication reviewers say about the book:
“Eminent naturalist and wildlife advocate Rick Lamplugh draws from a deep personal wellspring of experience and knowledge to take readers into Yellowstone’s wild heart.” Cristina Eisenberg, PhD, Chief Scientist, Earthwatch Institute, author

“…an important book that deserves to be read by everyone who cares about wildlife and wildlands.” Barbara Moritsch, author

“Lamplugh is a word artist; Yellowstone is his palette.” Julianne Baker, Yellowstone instructor

“A touch of Bill Bryson’s whimsy, a dose of Edward Abbey’s insight, and the story-telling charm of John McPhee…” John Gillespie, geologist

Here’s what the book’s about:
The year of immersion begins when my wife Mary and I trust the pull of Yellowstone; leave family, friends, and security after thirty-five years in Oregon; and relocate to Gardiner, Montana, at Yellowstone’s north gate. 

As you read Deep into Yellowstone, you are right there with us as we cross-country ski, hike, bicycle, and backpack into Yellowstone’s wild grandeur. You will also learn about important controversies: the dispute over hunting park wolves along Yellowstone’s border, the debate about whether wolves help or harm the ecosystem and the local economy, the outrage over the proposed removal of grizzlies from ESA protection, the fight to stop the slaughter of park bison, the reality of overuse of the park, and the effort to stop a gold mine right on the park’s border.

I ended my year of immersion with an even stronger love for Yellowstone’s grandeur and a deeper knowledge of the controversies that threaten the park from many directions and factions. And I hope you will too. ~ Rick Lamplugh 

Rick Lamplugh writes to protect wildlife and preserve wildlands. A signed copy of his new book, Deep into Yellowstone, is available from Rick at http://bit.ly/2tIEt62. The book is also on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2tgPU3E. A signed copy of his best seller In the Temple of Wolves is available from Rick at http://bit.ly/1gYghB4. It is also on Amazon at http://amzn.to/Jpea9Q.