Lone Wolf, Bad Wolves, Big Bad Wolf Just More Oxymorons & Fairy Tales…

…Statements like these that seems to be contradictory or go against common sense & perpetuate the myths that plaques the Gray Wolf’s reputation around the world. Now a popular musical band called “Bad Wolves” sings about bombings and acts of violence that perpetuates these myths. Doesn’t seem possible to bring wolf education or awareness or any real scientific facts to a public that is being brainwashed by these terms. In popular music culture “Bad Wolves” propels the Big Bad Wolf Myth in their music.

Even worse there’s the lone wolf term to define acts of terrorism.

A lone wolf is an animal or person that generally lives or spends time alone instead of with a group. The term originates from wolf behavior. Normally a pack animal, wolves that have left or been excluded from their pack are described as lone wolves.

Featured image art by Bob Elsdale Getty Images

Today the term lone wolf is heard to mean terrorist. The term “lone wolf” stems from American white supremacists…who in the 1990s encouraged fellow believers to commit violent acts independently to evade detection. Source Bloomberg

Credit: The LoneWolf by CerahArt (Deviantart)

Then there’s the classic western culture’s fairy tales of the Big Bad Wolf in Little Red Riding Hood, and The Three Little Pigs.

An anthropologist chases down a tale told around the world source National Geographic. It’s been suggested that the tale was an invention of Charles Perrault, who wrote it down in the 17th century. Other people have insisted that “Little Red Riding Hood” has ancient origins. There’s an 11th-century poem from Belgium which was recorded by a priest, who says, oh, there’s this tale told by the local peasants about a girl wearing a red baptism tunic who wanders off and encounters this wolf.

It’s ironic that Little Red Riding Hood encounters a lone wolf. Many suggest this tale is a warning to young girls to stay away from lone men, that prey upon innocent young girls and woman.

NG article…An anthropologist chases down a tale told around the world…What happens next depends on which version you hear: Was Little Red Riding Hood devoured? Did a passing huntsman cut her from the wolf’s belly? Did she trick the wolf into letting her go outside? In parts of Iran, the child in peril is a boy, because little girls wouldn’t wander out on their own. In Africa, the villain could be a fox or a hyena. In East Asia, the predator is more likely to be a big cat.

Either way, the terms lone wolf or bad wolves along with Little Red Riding Hood fairy tales are oxymorons that contradicts common sense & perpetuate the myths that plaques the Gray Wolf’s reputation around the world. Therefore, It seems rather hopeless to bring wolf education or awareness or any real scientific facts to a public that is being brainwashed by these terms.

There’s no big bad wolf here!

The Big Bad Wolf Gets A Rebranding; A new way to look at the wolf in arts and literature.

The wolf has been given a bad rap through-out western culture. The visual arts and literature has played an active role in perpetuating this fear and hate of wolves. We are all familiar with  ‘The big Bad Wolf’ and ‘The three Little Pigs’ as examples of children’s books written about wild wolves for the purpose of instilling fear. I am a retired art teacher that believes art has an influence on culture. Therefore, was delighted to come across this article on that very subject, and decided to immediately post this on my blog.

Story Source: The Big Bad Wolf Gets A Rebranding By Adele Peters is a staff writer at Co.Exist who focuses on sustainable design. Previously, she worked with GOOD, BioLite, and the Sustainable Products and Solutions program at UC Berkeley. You can reach her at apeters at fastcompany dot com. Continued

The Big Bad Wolf Gets A Rebranding

An endangered species is worthy of our care, not fear.

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

Ever since the publication of Little Red Riding Hood—and even long before—wolves have gotten a bad rap in pop culture (with the possible exception of wolf-themed indie band names). A new art campaign seeks to rebrand the Big Bad Wolf as a misunderstood hero, in an attempt to help build support for an endangered species that doesn’t get a lot of love.

“Art plays a role in how we as a society understand certain issues and ideas, and wolves are one case where art and culture have kind of done a misservice,” says Max Slavkin, CEO of the Creative Action Network, which partnered with the nonprofit Earthjustice on the new campaign. The #JoinThePack campaign will crowdsource new gray wolf art from a community of artists and designers, which will be turned into T-shirts and posters.

“The stories that we all kind of know, where wolves are the bad guy, seem innocuous enough, but have a real impact on how we view wolves in real life, where we want them to be, and how we treat them when we encounter them,” Slavkin says. “So much of that seems to have stemmed from stories and art over the last however-many hundred years. It feel like it’s our responsibility as a community of artists to try to set it right, especially now that wolves are maybe more threatened than they’ve ever been before.”

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

Twenty years ago, wolves were reintroduced to places like Yellowstone and parts of Idaho—both to help reset local ecosystems that had been thrown out of balance when wolves first disappeared and as actions taken to restore wolf populations under the Endangered Species Act. But though the population has grown, wolves have faced opposition ever since. When wolves accidentally crossed the border from Yellowstone into other parts of Wyoming, until last fall, they could be shot.

There’s also the ongoing possibility that the wolf could be taken off the endangered species list for politically motivated reasons. It’s been delisted in some areas, put back in others, and could easily be delisted elsewhere. This year, Congress slipped a rider into a government spending bill that would eliminate protections for wolves in several states, opening them up to hunters.

“When we started on this campaign, I was surprised to learn just how much is going on today in Congress and state legislatures that’s really bad for wolves,” Slavkin says.

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

He’s hoping the campaign can help start a bigger conversation, and do it in a fun way—one of the requirements of the designs is that they display some degree of kitsch. “We didn’t want it to be ‘wolves are awesome, end of story,'” Slavkin says. “We thought something fun and kitschy would make people smile, and make people interested in a way that other images couldn’t.”

[All Images: courtesy Creative Action Network]

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