…Why one species is given a black mark beside it and another is elevated to a position of reverence.

I enjoyed reading John Anderson’s perspective concerning his recent opinion editorial where he makes a strong case for the wolf; Perhaps it is time for us to ask why one species is given a black mark beside it and another is elevated to a position of reverence. I give you the wolf and the bald eagle.”

Community Columnist for The Chippewa Herold

John Andersen: The difference between eagles and wolves Mar 3, 2018

Over the past few weeks I read some great news in several newspapers, including this one. With great fanfare it has come to pass that the bald eagle has returned from the brink of extinction. Through the use of science and facts, DDT was banned as a pesticide in 1972. The result today is that there are 1,600 occupied eagle nests in virtually every part of the state.

This is outstanding news. Using simple math, that means there are about 3,200 adult eagles around. All 72 counties have eagle nests in them, and here in Lake Hallie, eagles are becoming a more common sight. No longer do you have a take a trip “up north” or drive down to Wabasha, Minnesota, to see them in the winter months. Bald eagles are becoming a success story throughout the nation and in Wisconsin. So when does the hunting season on them start?

In consulting the literature, there are plenty of problems with having too many bald eagles. First of all, the moral character of the bald eagle is appalling. No other than Founding Father Benjamin Franklin said about bald eagles:

““For my own part, I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen the representative of our country. He is a bird of bad moral character. He does not get his living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead tree near the river, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the labour of the fishing hawk; and when that diligent bird has at length taken a fish, and is bearing it to his nest for the support of his mate and young ones, the bald eagle pursues him and takes it from him.” Ben Franklin wished our national symbol to be the wild turkey, which considering what is going on in Washington right now, is not a bad idea.

Of course we have all heard the stories of bald eagles carrying off small children. Eagles also have been known to carry off pets. Bald eagles raise a holy terror with the family chickens, and of course everyone has lost fish off a line to bald eagles. Perhaps the Legislature could petition the federal government to remove the bald eagle from the endangered species list and leave the regulation of bald eagles to the state of Wisconsin and the other 49 states.

Wisconsin could then set up a lottery for hunting bald eagles. There would be no age requirement for a license, you could wear blaze pink while hunting them, and a local merchant could set up a “big eagle” contest for the largest wingspan. Yes I know that some eagles would be poached and some would not be registered, but what the heck. Stuff happens. Yes I also know that the Native Americans have legends about the eagle and revere them in tribal culture, but we can do what we have done for the wolves and give then 50 percent of the kill permits.

At this point, some people’s heads have exploded, and they are wondering what ear I am pulling this nonsense out of. Perhaps it is time for us to ask why one species is given a black mark beside it and another is elevated to a position of reverence. I give you the wolf and the bald eagle.

“But it is a funny thing, I never hear people blame bald eagles when they don’t catch any fish. Fish are the main course for them. Yet they blame wolves when they don’t shoot a deer.”

As of 2017 the Wisconsin DNR projects the wolf population in Wisconsin to be 925 or about one third as many bald eagles. Remember the same DNR also did the projections on the bald eagle count in Wisconsin. We still see TV ads and print ads featuring the wolf as the bad guy. Perhaps it is time to stop that nonsense.

The wolf and the bald eagle fit into the ecosystem for a purpose. Both are predators that thin the populations of the prey they feed on. But it is a funny thing, I never hear people blame bald eagles when they don’t catch any fish. Fish are the main course for them. Yet they blame wolves when they don’t shoot a deer.

The town of Hallie was built upon land that our ancestors called “Wolf Prairie.” The bald eagles have returned here. Maybe someday a wolf will wander through its ancestral home; hopefully it won’t be promptly shot by “accident.”

John R. Andersen of Lake Hallie is a former state employee who remains active in the fields of fire prevention, government and education.

Wolves are a part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy…

Wolves have an amazing olfactory sense. They will blow on the bed where a White-tailed deer slept causing all the particles to flow up and into their olfactory sense. By doing this the wolf can tell if the White-tailed deer is healthy or not. A wolf can tell if the tick that fell off the White-tailed deer has puss in the blood. Wolves can tell if a White-tailed deer has a tooth infection by smelling a chewed leaf. Wolves have kept a healthy balance in the wild for centuries. Yet, the politician claims to be the best at deciding the fate of the wolf. Stand firm, speak for wolves, because we have the moral high-ground. Wolves are a part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy. They keep the White-tailed deer healthy.

Featured image by John E Marriott

Latest blogs

Round Two in Public Hearings as SB 602 Fails the Fact-Check-Test…

Ill conceived Assembly Bill 712 Takes a Nose-Dive in Public Hearing

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story” become a valued donor…

Please take action to keep wolf hunt quota low near Yellowstone National Park to support wolf tourism and research. 

Action Alert courtesy of Ilona Popper.

1.      Call each Montana Fish, Wildlife, Parks Commissioner:

Tim Aldrich, (406) 241-7164  (I just had a great conversation with him!)                                                                                                      Dan Vermillion, Chairman (406) 222-0624  or dan@sweetwatertravel.com  (our district)                                                  Richard Stuker, Vice-Chairman (406) 357-3495                                 Logan Brower, (406)230-2188                                                                     Shane Colton, (406) 259-9986

2.      Go to the meeting on Jan 24 and speak up.  Bozeman or Helena.

3.      Email Karen Loveless, Howard Burt, and Mark Delerey so they hear the other side from Gardiner:kloveless@mt.gov    hburt@mt.gov    mdelerey@mt.gov

The most important points are:

1. We thank FWP for proposing a quota of 2 wolves in unit 316 and 2 wolves in unit 313 and we ask that the Commissioners vote to approve these quotas.

2. We want to see FWP protect wolves in this area and keep quotas low and even lower in 313/316 to support wolf tourism and research. 

• Studies show that density of predators like wolves and lions can lower the rates of Chronic Wasting Disease in elk and deer.  (sources: N. Thompson Hobbs wrote “A Model Analysis of Effects of Wolf Predation on the Prevalence of Chronic Wasting Disease in Elk Populations of Rocky Mountain National Park.” by Hobbs  and “Mountain lions prey selectively on prion-infected mule deer,” lead author Caroline E. Krumm.)

• There already is plenty of “trophy hunter opportunity” for wolves nearby in Gardiner Basin, Paradise Valley and throughout Montana.

• Wolves in Gardiner basin (and throughout Montana) take very few livestock.

3.   We support FWPs review of the ways that they count wolves in Gardiner basin to better reflect the actual resident packs and the numbers of wolves that regularly use this area.  If the count inaccurately comes out to 30 resident wolves, as it did in 2016, quotas may be set too high and too many wolves removed.

Current FWP surveys show 12-15 resident wolves in this area, and as territorial animals, they mostly keep other wolves out.  At the proposed total quota of 4, we will kill 25% to 33% of the wolves in Gardiner basin. (FWP claims people may kill up to 29% without harm to the population, but we want to see a far lower percentage–see our point #2.)

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Featured image by NPS / Jim Peaco

Bill Would Block Wisconsin Law Enforcement From Prosecuting Illegal Wolf Killings

Northern Wisconsin GOP Legislators Hopeful To Pressure Congress To Remove Gray Wolf From Endangered Species ListSunday, November 12, 2017, 6:20pm By Rich Kremer Wisconsin Public Radio

A group of Republican lawmakers from northern Wisconsin are pushing a bill that would block game wardens and police from investigating illegal wolf killings in the state. The legislation would prohibit law enforcement from enforcing any federal or state law that “relates to the management of the wolf population in this state or that prohibits the killing of wolf in this state.” It’s being backed by GOP state Reps. Adam Jarchow of Balsam Lake, Mary Felzkowski of Irma and Romaine Quinn of Rice Lake, and Republican state Sen. Tom Tiffany of Hazelhurst.

In an email calling for co-sponsors for the measure, the authors said it’s an attempt to put pressure on Congress to pass pending federal legislation that would remove the gray wolf from the endangered species list. Jarchow, who has announced a run for state Senate, said the bill mirrors an executive order made by Idaho Gov. Butch Otter in 2011 that he believes forced the federal government to lift wolf protections there.

“Our view is if the federal government is so smart and they know everything about running wolves and how to manage wolves from Washington, then they can do it and we’re out,” said Jarchow. “And I think as a result of that, that will put some pressure on Congress to de-list the wolf (and) let Wisconsin actually manage our wolf population.”

In 2011 the U.S. Interior Department removed the gray wolf from the endangered species list in western Great Lakes states. Republicans quickly devised and passed a state wolf hunt aimed at reducing a growing population. But the hunt only lasted from 2012 to 2014, after a federal appeals court placed the wolves back on the list, arguing that the federal regulators failed to consider the impacts of de-listing and didn’t account for the loss of the animal’s historic range.

Since then, a growing number of farmers, beef producers, hunters and lawmakers in northern Wisconsin have complained that the state’s wolf population has gotten out of hand and is causing problems. Jarchow said they’ve been waiting for the passage of federal legislation that would remove wolf protections again. But until that happens he believes the federal government is acting in bad faith, so Wisconsin shouldn’t participate in what he sees as faulty management.

“The Constitution prohibits the federal government from forcing states to enforce federal law,” said Jarchow. “We can agree to enforce federal law, which we have done through a partnership with the federal government on wolves for quite a long time and what we are essentially doing with this bill, if it were to pass, would be to require the state to pull out of that partnership.”

But wolf advocate Rachel Tilseth of the group Wolves of Douglas County is skeptical the bill will pass. She believes the legislation is more about getting attention for the anti-wolf cause in Wisconsin.

“This is a far-reaching bill, this is a ploy to get their way, this is a way to drum up more publicity for their cause and they’re not telling the truth,” Tilseth said. “They’re not giving real facts.”

Tilseth said claims that wolves are decimating deer populations in northern Wisconsin and killing off mass amounts of livestock are exaggerated. Despite a recent report of a record wolf population in the state, she pointed out that payments made to farmers for animals attacked by wolves were down in 2016.

Proposed legislation would make it illegal for law enforcement to enforce state or federal law relating to management of wolves in Wisconsin. 

This legislation will be difficult to enforce, but that’s not stopping Representaive Adam Jarchow from employing the latest “smoke and mirrors” political rhetoric.  Rep. Jarchow’s fueling the anti-wolf fires again spreading hate and fear for Wisconsin’s wild wolf.  Wisconsin’s citizens can distinguish fact from fiction. The following are the facts. Wolves take 6% of Wisconsin’s White-tailed deer population in a year.  Livestock depredations are down in 2017, just click here for the 2017 wolf depredations report. 

Wisconsin’s wild wolf is a federally protected endangered species. 

Here’s the latest political ploy…

In an email dated Wednesday, November 8, 2017 to Legislative Colleagues from Rep. Adam Jarchow, Rep. Mary Felzkowski,  Rep. Romaine Quinn  and Sen. Tom Tiffany regarding Co-sponsorship of LRB 3737/1 – Managing Wisconsin’s wolf population

The following is Rep. Adam Jarchow’s email:

In 2011, Idaho Governor Butch Otter issued an executive order stating that the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) would no longer monitor wolf populations, investigate illegal wolf killings, or reimburse farmers whose livestock have been killed by wolves. As a result of this executive order, the federal government de-listed the wolf in Idaho. Since then, Idaho has been able to manage its wolf population without interference from the federal government.

Wolves have taken over northern Wisconsin. They are depredating our deer population, killing livestock and attacking family pets. The gray wolf has been placed on the federal Endangered Species List by a federal judge in Washington D.C. thus leaving Wisconsin unable to manage our own wolf population.

Currently, there is a bill at the federal level to de-list the wolf from the Endangered Species List, but has not yet made its way to the President’s desk. Congress has proven to be unable to pass this simple bill to save Wisconsinites from wolves running rampant throughout our state. Something must be done.

If Congress won’t act – we will!

Today, we are circulating for co-sponsorship, LRB 3737/1 which would make it illegal for law enforcement to enforce state or federal law relating to management of wolves in Wisconsin. It also does not allow the Department of Natural Resources to expend any funds relating to wolf management other than paying claims under the endangered resources program for damage caused by wolves.

Please stand with the citizens of northern Wisconsin and co-sponsor LRB 3737/1 by calling Senator Tiffany’s office at 266-2509 or Rep. Jarchow’s office at 267-2365 by Friday, November 17th at 5:00 p.m.  (End of Jarchow’s email)

The following is the proposed legislation…

AN ACT to create 29.603 of the statutes; relating to: enforcement of federal and state laws relating to the management of the wolf population and to the killing of wolves and expenditure of funds for wolf management purposes.

Analysis by the Legislative Reference Bureau
This bill makes changes to the laws regulating wolf hunting and the laws authorizing funding for wolf management activities.
Under current law, the Department of Natural Resources is required to allow the hunting and trapping of wolves if the wolf is not listed on the U.S. list of endangered and threatened species and is not listed on the state endangered list.
This bill prohibits a law enforcement officer from enforcing a federal or state law that relates to the management of the wolf population in this state or that prohibits the killing of wolf in this state. The bill prohibits DNR from expending any funds for the purpose of managing the wolf population in this state other than for the purpose of making payments under the endangered resources program to persons who apply for reimbursement for certain damage caused by wolves or protecting private property, including domestic cattle, from wolf depredation. The bill also prohibits DNR from taking any action to inform or support federal law enforcement officers regarding the enforcement of any federal or state law relating to wolves. The bill specifies that these prohibitions apply only if wolves are listed on the U.S. list of endangered and threatened species. Under the bill, if wolves are removed from that list, the prohibitions in the bill will no longer apply.

The following is how Wisconsin manages its wild wolf population when it’s not on the ESL. 


The public is unaware that dogs are used to hunt wolves in Wisconsin when they are not listed on the federal or state endangered species list. Wisconsin’s state legislature sanctions the barbaric sport known as Wolf-Hounding. 

Wolves are currently protected under the ESA, but there are several bills in congress that call for delisting wolves. When wolves are not listed Wisconsin wolf hunters will use dogs to hunt them under the guise of sport. To read more about this click here.

Join Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin’s campaign to end Wolf Hounding. Contact us: wolvesdouglasco@gmail.com 

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Featured images by Ian McAllister

“There has never been a more important time for the people of Wisconsin to show they are not going to give in to a small group of people that want to torture animals for fun under the guise of “sport.” ~Rachel Tilseth 

First step in the campaign to end Wolf-hounding in Wisconsin is Awareness…

The public is unaware that dogs are used to hunt wolves in Wisconsin when they are not listed on the federal or state endangered species list. Wisconsin’s state legislature sanctions the barbaric sport known as Wolf-Hounding. 

The Wisconsin legislature sanctioned Wolf-Hounding  under   “2011 Wisconsin Act 169” allowing the use of dogs to track and trail wolves.  2011 Wisconsin Act 169.

WODCW Wolf Hounding Fact Sheet: Wisconsin, quite literally, throws dogs to wolves…

Out of all the states that hunt wolves, only Wisconsin allows hound hunters to use unleashed packs of dogs to hunt wolves. Wisconsin, quite literally, throws “dogs to the wolves.”Hound hunters traditionally train their dogs to focus on specific prey by releasing their dogs to surround, attack and terrorize a prey animal (e.g. a bear cub or fox) for hours on end (up to 16 hours/day) enclosed in a small, open barrel or “roll cage.” At this point it remains disturbingly unclear as to how hound hunters will train their dogs to pursue wolves instead of other animals—will it be by capturing wolves and allowing their dogs to attack them in barrels and pens? How isn’t this worse than illegal dog fighting? 

“There has never been a more important time for the people of Wisconsin to show they are not going to give in to a small group of people that want to torture animals for fun under the guise of “sport.” ~Rachel Tilseth 

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, charged with overseeing the wolf hunt, has no rules in place that require hound handlers to report dogs injured or killed in the pursuit of wolves during a hunt. In fact, there is no monitoring or certification program whatsoever in place for the use of dogs in the wolf hunt; thus the state has little ability to hold hound hunters accountable for training or hunting violations or to prevent deadly and inhumane wolf-dog confrontations (e.g., hunters allowing dogs to overtake and kill rifle-shot wolves). These circumstances explain why Wisconsin stands alone: using dogs to hunt wolves is no better than state-sponsored dog fighting.

Wolves are currently protected under the ESA, but there are several bills in congress that call for delisting wolves. When wolves are not listed Wisconsin wolf hunters will use dogs to hunt them under the guise of sport. 

Hound handlers are equipped with high tech radio telemetry devices that allow them to track GPS-collared hunting dogs from long distances. They are often not able to catch up to hounds that have a wolf at bay to prevent deadly fights between dogs and wolves. As proof of this, (during the bear hunt’s use of dogs) to date, Wisconsin has paid over $500,000 to “reimburse” hound-hunters for hunting dogs injured or killed by wolves. See link WDNR Dog depredations by wolves

Please Join WODCW’s campaign to end wolf-hounding in Wisconsin. 

According to DNR regulations, hound handlers are only allowed to use up to six dogs at a time to trail wolves. But handlers often replace tired dogs with fresh ones and younger dogs. It is common for a handler to be unable to retrieve the tired dogs, and end up with up well over 6 dogs chasing one wolf, potentially twice or even three times as many. There is no monitoring system in place to ensure that only 6 dogs pursue wolves.

In 2013 & 2014 Wisconsin sanctioned the use of dogs to hunt wolves. 

Take Action to end Wolf-Hounding in Wisconsin 

Join Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin’s campaign to end Wolf Hounding.  Contact us: wolvesdouglasco@gmail.com 

Contact your Wisconsin State Legislator and make it clear you do not sanction Wolf Hounding in Wisconsin!

At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst. ~Aristotle

*Wisconsin allows the use of dogs in pursuit of bear, and has a reimbursement program of $2,500.00 for each dog killed by wolves defending their pups.  There is NO reimbursement during wolf-hounding. 

Wolves in Peril: The Hunt has Begun

Anger, disgust, fear – those are the emotions running through me right now.

The 6-month-long wolf hunting season in Montana begins today, September 15th and runs through March 15th – six long and stress-filled months. Montana has mapped the state into 18 Wolf Management Units (WMUs) which it opens to wolf hunting. Of these 18 WMUs, only 3 have quotas. The remaining 15 have no limits on how many wolves are killed.

What makes the Montana scheduled wolf hunt all that much worse is that many of the WMUs immediately surround Yellowstone, Teton, and Glacier National Parks, where wolves are protected, and which also serve as corridors for wolves dispersing into or out of these parks. The Yellowstone wolves, especially, are more used to and tolerant of human presence. If these wolves happen to take one step over the invisible park boundary, they can be shot and killed by trophy “hunters”. How “sporting” is it to sit with a loaded rifle just outside of a National Park waiting for a wolf to step over a human-drawn border of which the wolf has no knowledge?

How lonely is the night without the howl of a wolf. ~Unknown

I realize that Yellowstone wolves are no more or less important than any other wolves, but the Yellowstone wolves are the wolves I have come to know – I know their stories. I have watched them in person, I have photographed them, I read about their lives on a daily basis. I care deeply about these wolves because I know them. Each day between now and March 15th I dread that I will read that one of the Yellowstone wolves that I have come to know has fallen victim to the wolf hunt.

Yellowstone wolves are in even greater peril, as the first wolf hunting season since 2013 begins in Wyoming on October 1st and runs through December 31st. Wyoming has designated 12 wolf hunting units surrounding Yellowstone National Park where up to 44 wolves can be shot and killed. In the remainder of the state, wolves are considered predatory animals and can be shot and killed 24/7, 365 days a year.

When I was twelve, I went hunting with my father and we shot a bird. He was laying there and something struck me. Why do we call this fun to kill this creature [who] was as happy as I was when I woke up this morning. ~Marv Levy

It seems that wolves everywhere are under attack. In my home state of Wisconsin, wolves are being used as political pawns and may soon be hunted like Montana’s and Wyoming’s wolves. What’s worse, is that in Wisconsin it is legal to use dogs when hunting wolves – pitting dogs against wolves – it doesn’t get much lower than that.

With the ever-growing movement of protecting and preserving wolves and wildlife, it appears our politicians and state wildlife agencies are doing just the opposite and keeping the recovery and future of wolves in peril.

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Letter to the editor (LTE) writing campaign: the public needs to hear from you! 

Great Lakes wolves could be delisted anytime now and placed in the hands of state management.  Wisconsin legislature mandates in Act 169 that when wolves are not listed on either federal or state endangered lists that they must be hunted. (Wisconsin Act 169) Wisconsin is the only state that allows the inhumane act of  “wolf Hounding” and Quite literally, throws dogs to wolves. Michigan voters, said no to a wolf hunt, yet in a shocking reversal of democratic principles,  Gov. Snyder signs wolf hunt bill in spite of voter opposition.  In Minnesota wolves are on the threatened list, which means the state has more authority on management of any wolf depredations on livestock, but legislators still push for a wolf hunt. 

Wisconsin wolves are in jeopardy and need your help.  I’m asking every Wisconsin wolf advocate to take action for wolves by submitting letters to the editor.

 I’ve included;  why write a letter, tips on writing a letter, and several links to Wisconsin newspapers. 

Now get to work advocates….

Writing an Effective Letter to the Editor (LTE), Writing a letter to the editor of your local or regional newspaper is the best way to reach a large audience with your message. LTEs are printed on the editorial page.  The editorial page is one of the most read pages in the paper. Members of congress keep a close eye on media coverage, including LTEs, in their local papers so they can keep an eye out for issues of importance to their constituents. Letters that get published helps reach both a wide public audience and your elected officials.  Even if your letter is not published, it is important for educating and persuading editors. The more letters they receive on a given topic, the more likely they are to dedicate more time in their newspaper to that issue, both on the editorial page and in news articles. It clearly expresses the issue’s importance to the community. 

The following tips are from: Union of Concerned Scientists

Keep your letter short, focused, and interesting. In general, letters should be under 200 words, 150 or less is best; stay focused on one (or, at the most, two) main point(s); and get to the main point in the first two sentences. If possible include interesting facts, relevant personal experience, and any local connections to the issue. If you letter is longer than 200 words, it will likely be edited or not printed. 

Write the letter in your own words. Editors want letters in their papers to be original and from a reader. Be sure that you take the time to write the letter in your own words. 

Refute, advocate, and make a call to action. Most letters to the editor follow a standard format. Open your letter by refuting the claim made in the original story the paper ran. Then use the next few sentences to back up your claims and advocate for your position. Try to focus on the positive. For example: According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, investments in renewable energy would bring over $200 million to our state and create 36,000 jobs by 2020. Then wrap your letter up by explaining what you think needs to happen now, make your call to action. 

Include your contact information. Be sure to include your name, address, and daytime phone number; the paper will contact you before printing your letter. 

 

-Submit your letter to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

The Journal Sentinel welcomes readers’ letters. Timely, well-written, provocative opinions on topics of interest in Milwaukee and Wisconsin are given first preference. All letters are subject to editing. The form below is for submission to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel editorial department for possible publication. Letters selected for publication in the newspaper will also be posted on JSOnline.com.
Guidelines
Generally, we limit letters to 200 words. Name, street address and daytime phone are required. We cannot acknowledge receipt of submissions. We don’t publish poetry, anonymous or open letters.  Each writer is limited to one published letter every two months. Write: Letters to the editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 

P.O. Box 371, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0371

Fax: (414)-223-5444

E-mail: jsedit@journalsentinel.com

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel click HERE to submit a letter to the editor

-Submit your letter to the editor to the Wisconsin State Journal: click madison.com to submit

-Submit your letter to the editor to the La Crosse Tribune Click HERE for the online form

The Tribune encourages letters to the editor on current issues. Please limit letters to 250 words or fewer. We reserve the right to edit all letters and require that all letters include the name, address and phone number of the writer for verification purposes. Letter writers will be limited to no more than one letter a month. Please do not send poetry, items taken from other publications or from the Internet. Send letters to: Letters to the editor, La Crosse Tribune, 401 N. Third St. La Crosse WI 54601 or e-mail letters@lacrossetribune.com. Click here to use our online form.

-The Green Bay Press-Gazette welcomes letters to the editor of 250 or fewer words. You can send us your letter online by filling out the information below. Rules for Submission:

Letters must include your first and last name, complete address, and daytime phone number. Only your name and community will be published. Anonymous contributions, pseudonyms and first initials are not allowed. Contributors whose identities cannot be verified to our reasonable satisfaction may be required to submit further identification or their contributions will be withheld from publication. Contributors are limited to one published letter per month. Letters must be no longer than 250 words. They will be edited if necessary for clarity or brevity. Include sources for facts and figures included in your letter, either in the text of your letter or as a note at the bottom for our reference. Unless otherwise noted, all material must be original to the author. Mass-mailing letters will not be accepted. Guest columns must be no longer than 600 words and will be held to a higher standard of reader interest than letters and calls. It’s recommended to contact us before submitting a guest column. Letters to the editor may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. Submit letters via:

♦ E-mail at forum@greenbaypressgazette.com
♦ Fax at (920) 431-8379
♦ Regular mail at Green Bay Press-Gazette, Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 23430, Green Bay WI, 54305-3430
♦ Or drop them off at the Press-Gazette office at 435 E. Walnut St., Green Bay. Lobby hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

-Submit your letter to the Leader-Telegram Click HERE

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Wisconsin’s citizens want to resolve the “decades-old” conflict between bear hounders and wolves through the legislative process 

Many animals are harmed (through suffering and killing) to serve human interests and values without due consideration of other animals’ interests and intrinsic value.  ~Compassionate Conservation 

Wisconsin can no longer afford to go back, back to the old way of thinking;  the killing of wildlife in order to conserve them. For example; Wisconsin spent decades on wolf recovery, recovery of an imperiled species that was hunted to near extinction; then in a shocking twist, the state of Wisconsin legislature mandated a trophy hunt of wolves fresh off the Endangered Species List; 

If the wolf is not listed on the federal endangered list and is not listed on the state endangered list, the department shall allow the hunting and trapping of wolves and shall regulate such hunting and trapping as provided in this section and shall implement a wolf management plan. In regulating wolf hunting and trapping, the department may limit the number of wolf hunters and trappers and the number of wolves that may be taken by issuing wolf harvesting licenses. 2011 Wisconsin Act 169, wolf hunt.

Compassion for animals should be fundamental for conservation because poor conservation outcomes are often consistent with the mistreatment of animals. ~Marc Bekoff

During the 2016 Wisconsin bear hunting season 37 hunting dogs were lost in the pursuit of bear. But instead of looking at current conservation policies; wolves, that were defending their pups against free ranging hunting dogs in the pursuit of bear were wrongly being scapegoated. 

It’s a mystery as to just how many dogs in pursuit of bear are running through the woods during training & hunting. Why is this a mystery? Because a change in regulations took place that removed the Class B bear training & hunting licence. Because of that change it’s impossible to know; just how many dogs in pursuit of bear are running through the woods. 

Wolf pups are born around mid-April and are approximately two and a half months at the time Wisconsin bear hunters begin training dogs on bear starting on July first. Typically wolves leave their pups at a rendezvous site for safe keeping to be watched over by a babysitter. The pup’s family members keep a close eye on the rendezvous site while off hunting. WODCW Blog

However, there is a lack of regulations with bear hunting & training and it has led to a conflict between wolves and bear hunters. Once the training & hunting class B license was removed, that change allowed for an undetermined number of dogs running through wolf habitat. That could definitely be the cause of the 37 bear hunting dog deaths. 


Wolves that were defending their pups against free ranging hunting dogs in the pursuit of bear are targeted by special interests instead of the real problem; that being,  conservation policy favoring the killing of one species to save another, for the benefit of sport hunting. 

For decades there has been a conflict between bear hunters and wolves in the north woods of Wisconsin, and now that conflict has become one of the reasons Wisconsin legislators want to delist wolves. Watch the following Wisconsin Public Television show from the year 2010.

Wolves are an imperiled species, that are a part of Wisconsin’s wild legacy, and are being pushed to the brink of extinction by conservation policies that favor a group of fringe hunters. These special interest, fringe hunters take advantage of the current political environment.  They cause harm to wildlife by the “loosening” of regulations; they pushed for the removal of the Class B bear training & hunting licence that allowed for an undetermined number of dogs running through wolf habitat. That could definitely be the cause of the 37 bear hunting dog deaths. 

Therefore; the legislative process will move forward; to remove the use of dogs to hunt wolves (when wolves are taken off ESL this is one of the methods used to hunt them in Wisconsin), runnng dogs on bear is causing conflict between bear hounders, wolves and northern residents.

The following is a Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Wolf Hounding Fact Sheet:


 Out of all the states that hunt wolves, only Wisconsin allows hound hunters to use unleashed packs of dogs to hunt wolves. Wisconsin, quite literally, throws “dogs to the wolves.”Hound hunters traditionally train their dogs to focus on specific prey by releasing their dogs to surround, attack and terrorize a prey animal (e.g. a bear cub or fox) for hours on end (up to 16 hours/day) enclosed in a small, open barrel or “roll cage.” At this point it remains disturbingly unclear as to how hound hunters will train their dogs to pursue wolves instead of other animals—will it be by capturing wolves and allowing their dogs to attack them in barrels and pens? How isn’t this worse than illegal dog fighting?
 “There has never been a more important time for the people of Wisconsin to show they are not going to give in to a small group of people that want to torture animals for fun under the guise of “sport.”  WODCW Blog 


Here’s how you can help;

Contact at wolvesdouglasco@gmail.com 

Please contact us if you have filed written complaints with your local law enforcement concerning issues with bear hounders.

With a guiding principle of ‘first do no harm’, compassionate conservation offers a bold, virtuous, inclusive, and forward-looking framework that provides a meeting place for different perspectives and agendas to discuss and solve issues of human-animal conflict when sharing space. Source 

*Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin is made up of concerned citizens who volunteer their time to make changes for the betterment of Wisconsin’s wolves and wildlife. WODCW is all volunteer and is not a non profit. 

Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin does not partner with or align with the ideas or actions of Wolf Patrol, Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf or Wisconsin Wolf Front. 



Tremendous momentum by Wolf Summit ll to delist Wisconsin’s wolf for a trophy hunt

 Wisconsin Wolf Facts a group pushing for a wolf hunt, sponsored Wolf Summit ll held Saturday April 8 in northern Wisconsin with 50 people in attendance; “It’s like any population, there needs to be some control measures, we have none now,” said Sen. Tom Tiffany (R – Hazelhurst). Source

Speakers at the Wolf Summit ll insist the southern part of the state doesn’t live among wolves and therefore, shouldn’t have any say in wolf management. Read it for yourself:

“What we found in the study was that the people that are affected by wolves, the rural residents of Northern Wisconsin, deer hunters, farmers, are very concerned. They don’t want more wolves they want less,” said DNR Wolf Committee Member Mike Brust. Source

Not all rural northern Wisconsin residents agree with Mike Burst.

Douglas county has the highest density of wolves and people with 56% of the citizens wanting to live by wolves. Interestingly enough, Douglas County has the oldest populations of wolves and the most tolerant showing that Wisconsin can coexist with wolves, from a Public Attitudes towards Wolves and Wolf Management in Wisconsin, conducted by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources August 2014. WODCW Blog  

Wolves are a protected species listed on the ESL. Wisconsin citizens are the encouraged to; 

MacFarland says the most important people to hear from are the citizens. “Hearing from people on what direction they’d like the state to go, and how they’d like the species to be managed,” said DNR Large Carnivore Specialist David MacFarland.

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Get the facts: It’s all carefully crafted propaganda to make the wolf look bad. WODCW Blog

In conclusion, It’s all carefully crafted propaganda to make the wolf look bad. When in reality the facts prove otherwise. Facts such as; a lack of bear hunting regulations caused the increase of wolf depredations on hunting dogs, the largest change in buck harvest occurred in the Northern Forest Zone (30 percent increase from 2015) and 52 livestock depredations out of 3.50 million head, proves; there’s no-big-bad-wolf here.


There’s only politicians with carefully crafted propaganda to make the wolf look bad.

Wisconsin wolf advocates are encouraged to write letters to the editor.