Wolf Country

Wisconsin’s northern and central forests are home to 955 gray wolves. Wisconsin is one of about a dozen states in the country with a wild gray wolf population. Gray wolves, also referred to as timber wolves, are the largest wild members of the dog family. Wolves are social animals, living in family groups or packs. A wolf’s territory may cover 20-80 square miles, which is about one tenth the size of an average Wisconsin county. WDNR Website about wolves

The following video clip was shot in July 2017. When we got out of the vehicle a Raven began to talk to us.

The gray wolf in the western Great Lakes region is currently on the Federal Endangered Species List. This listing status limits the state of Wisconsin’s management authority including the authority to hold a trophy hunts on wolves.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. Gray wolf travels down gravel road in northern Wisconsin.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. Lichen covered trees in northern Wisconsin.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. A wolf scat in the center of the gravel road. White-tailed deer hair and bones can be seen in this wolf scat.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. Gray wolf track in mud.

Photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18. There are gravel roads in wolf habitat spanning up to nine miles with little or no signs of human development.

I filmed this video clip two summers ago.

Featured photograph by Rachel Tilseth 03/04/18 in wolf county.

“The Yellowstone Story-Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy” film project…

A Documentary film project that tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Co Produced by Rachel Tilseth And Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth. Donate Here to support this film project

About the featured photograph we see Wolf #7 in shipping container in Rose Creek pen. Photograph credit NPS Jim Peaco, January 12, 1995 from public domain YNP Wolf Restoration.

Rick Lamplugh

The shooting of 06, Yellowstone’s famous alpha wolf, was a turning point for me. In the years since her death, I have come to understand how that single bullet did more than kill the alpha female and uproot the alpha male. That bullet threw the delicate social order of the pack into life-threatening disarray. That bullet forced many wolves to choose new leaders, new roles, new lives. That bullet led to my becoming a wolf advocate. And I know I’m not alone; others have told me how the death of 06 motivated them to fight for wolves. ~Rick Lamplugh, Wolf Advocate and renowned author.

Rick Lamplugh’s path to advocating for wolves.
A few years ago, (2012) my wife Mary and I spent our first full winter living and working at the Lamar Buffalo Ranch in the heart of Yellowstone’s wolf country. We were thrilled to see wolves almost every day. Our second winter, sadly, was much quieter than the first. The valley did not resound with the howls of wolves. We did not see the Lamar Canyon wolves resting on the hillside above the ranch. Instead, we felt the shock and sadness of watching the pack disintegrate after the female alpha and one of the adult males was shot outside the park in Wyoming. Observing firsthand the destructive impact of hunting on wolves we had come to know and respect, started me thinking about advocating for wolves.

My experiences and learning during those three winters became the basis for a book, In the Temple of Wolves: A Winter’s Immersion in Wild Yellowstone. As the book became an Amazon best seller, I grew certain of the debt I owed wolves. If I was going to benefit from writing about them, I must speak for them as well. I became a wolf advocate.

Eventually Mary and I heeded the pull of Yellowstone, left Oregon where we had lived for 36 years, and moved to Gardiner, Montana, at the park’s north entrance. We have been surprised to learn that Gardiner sits smack in the middle of a number of controversies: the dispute over hunting Yellowstone wolves outside the park; the debate whether wolves help or harm the ecosystem and the local economy; the concern about overuse of and development around the park; the community effort to stop a possible gold mine on the park’s border; the outrage over the plan to remove grizzlies from the endangered species list; and the battle to stop the slaughter of park bison.

While living at the Lamar Buffalo Ranch—a wildlife-filled bubble where animals roamed without fear of human intervention—I had stayed blissfully unaware of most of these controversies. But I cannot avoid them in Gardiner, nor do I want to. Instead, I immerse myself in the midst of these struggles. I’ve become an advocate for wildlife and wildlands.

Indie author Rick Lamplugh writes to protect wildlife and preserve wild lands. His new book, Deep into Yellowstone, is available signed from Rick at http://bit.ly/2tIEt62, or unsigned on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2tgPU3E.

His best seller, In the Temple of Wolves, is available signed at http://bit.ly/1gYghB4, or unsigned at http://amzn.to/Jpea9Q.

A signed set of both books is available with free shipping at http://bit.ly/2uYTtsU.

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story” A Documentary film project that tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Co Produced by Rachel Tilseth And Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth.

To support the film project go to Plan B Foundation ” Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy” and donate

Action Alert! Anti-Wolf Riders in House Bill Funding Dept of Interior

Our politicians are once again using wolves as political pawns and resuming their seemingly relentless assault against them. On Wednesday a House Panel approved a bill funding the Department of Interior and the EPA. This bill contains 2 highly toxic riders which would undermine 40 years of recovery and jeopardize the future of wolves.

The first rider would strip all federal protections of wolves in the Great Lakes region (Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan) and allow trapping and hunting to resume after it was put on hold in 2014 by a federal judge. The rider would also preclude any further judicial review of this overturned court order.

“Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.” -Albert Einstein

The second rider would prevent any money from being spent on federal recovery efforts of wolves in other parts of the country – the Mexican gray wolf in the southwest, the red wolf in North Carolina, and the 2 wolf packs that just resettled in California, to name a few.

We need to make our voices heard and let our politicians know that this bill, along with these anti-wolf riders, is not acceptable. Coexistence, not killing,  should be the goal of wolf recovery. Our wolves deserve a better fate than the death sentences our legislators are proposing.

“Animals should not require our permission to live on earth. Animals were given the right to be here long before we arrived.” -Anthony Douglas Williams

Please take a few minutes to call or email your Congressional Representative and US Senators. Links to contact your legislators are here:

US Senate: http://bit.ly/2sGeI1B

House of Representatives: http://www.house.gov/representatives/

To read more on the House bill: http://bit.ly/2tgjJOL

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From Earthjustice: Congress Unleashes War on Wolves

Earthjustice  January 18, 2017

Senators from Midwest and Wyoming introduce bill to strip protections from endangered gray wolves

Washington, D.C. — Senators from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming yesterday introduced the “War on Wolves Act,” a companion bill to legislation introduced last week in the House that would strip federal protections from wolves and allow trophy hunting and trapping of the species in four states. If the legislation passes both chambers and gets signed by the president, it would hand the fate of wolves in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Wyoming over to states whose management wolf plans two federal courts ruled inadequate to securing the species at legally required population levels in absence of Endangered Species Act protections.
In Wyoming, this would allow the state to resume a hostile management program that allowed for unlimited shoot-on-sight killing of wolves across 85 percent of the state. The legislation would further strip citizens of the right to challenge these lethal programs in court. The appeals process of two federal court decisions that restored federal protections to wolves in those four states are still underway. Decisions on those cases are expected any day.

The following is a statement from Marjorie Mulhall, Senior Legislative Counsel at Earthjustice:

“A new congress has resurfaced an old vendetta against imperiled wolves. If this legislation is signed into law, wolves in Wyoming will be subjected to unregulated killing across the vast majority of the state, and even on the borders of Yellowstone National Park numerous legal loopholes will authorize widespread wolf killing. Americans widely hailed the return of wolves to the Northern Rockies two decades ago as a triumph of the Endangered Species Act, but now this ‘War on Wolves Act’ would allow for the same unregulated killing that nearly wiped out the species in the first place. Politicians should not meddle in the science-based listing status of a particular species at any stage, but now is an especially bad time as these cases are still playing out in the courts. We urge those who support the protection of wolves to call their senators and representatives and tell them to vote down this lethal legislation.”
READ THE LEGISLATION:
H.R. 424

S. 164
EXPERT AVAILABLE FOR FURTHER COMMENT:
Tim Preso, Earthjustice attorney who leads on the Wyoming wolf case, based in Bozeman, Montana: (406) 586-9699 ext. 1924, tpreso@earthjustice.org
CONTACTS

Rebecca Bowe, Earthjustice, (415) 217-2093,
Marjorie Mulhall, Earthjustice, (202) 667-4500, ext. 5204

Read more on a Earthjustice website

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Featured image:

Polar packs – Opened in 1994 in the the heart of Norwegian Lapland, Polar Park is the world’s northernmost wildlife park. 
The highlight of this animal sanctuary is its population of seven gray wolves. Although they were all bred in captivity, some are more accustomed to humans than others. This means they are divided into three packs, each of which lives in a separate enclosure.

Calgary documentary about wolves wins Humane Society’s Genesis Award

Source: ERIC VOLMERS, CALGARY HERALD More from Eric Volmers, Calgary Herald Published on: April 22, 2016 

  

A Calgary TV documentary investigating Alberta’s management of wolves has picked up a prestigious international award from the Humane Society.
Geordie Day’s Unnatural Enemies: The War on Wolves, which was produced by Pyramid Productions, aired last May on CTV and examined the province’s controversial use of wire snares, strychnine poisoning and bounty hunters to kill wolves.
Earlier this week, the film received the Genesis Award for International TV Documentary by the Humane Society of the United States, which hands out awards each year to film, television, radio, music and arts productions that raise awareness of animal issues.
This year, awards also went to Louise Psihoyos’ feature documentary Racing Extinction, ABC’s 20/20 for its investigative piece on the killing of Cecil the lion and comedian Aziz Ansari, who won the Sid Caesar Comedy Award for his “factory farming rant” on the Netflix special Live at Madison Square Garden.
Leonardo DiCaprio, Paul McCarteny, Ricky Gervais and Prince have all been past recipients. 

Photograph Courtesy, Pyramid Productions CALGARY HERALD

State Politicians Pull a Sleight-of-Hand with Wisconsin Wolves

With incredable ​speed and ​skill the Wisconsin assembly cleverly pulled a sleight-of-hand magicians trick by approving legislation calling to push back wolf trophy hunt date. On December 19, 2014, Federal judge rules gray wolf hunt illegal, places animal back on endangered species list. Thus, putting an end to three years of trophy hunts on a once endangered species. 

State politicians would rather deceive the public than admit defeat. They are as magicians trying to direct your attention to something else while they do their main trick.  ~ Rachel

Read the follow news article:

Wisconsin assembly oks pushing back wolf hunt date UPDATED Tuesday, February 9, 2016—3:11 p.m.
 

 MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The state Assembly has approved a bill that would push the start of Wisconsin’s wolf hunt back if the federal government allows the season to resume.
Under current law, the wolf hunt begins on Oct. 15 and ends on the last day of February the following year. Rep. Al Ott’s bill would push the start date back to the first Saturday in November.
Ott has said the current wolf season conflicts with bird hunters and begins before wolves’ winter coats have grown in fully.
Wisconsin has held three wolf hunts. The federal government placed Great Lakes wolves back on the endangered species list in 2014, however, prohibiting the hunts.
The Assembly approved the bill on a voice vote Thursday. It now goes to the Senate.

  

   
Read more articles on Wisconsin’s political  war on wolves, Wisconsin lawmaker worried about unchecked wolf population