Candidate for U.S. Senate, Russ Feingold respects the Endangered Species Act…

Feingold wants to respect the federal judge’s ruling on wolves.
“Species don’t know about state lines,” he said. “The idea that you would have an endangered species law state by state shows frankly no understanding of how species operate and how they live.” Russ Feingold is running against Senator Ron Johnson this November.  Senator Johnson wants wolves delisted and management returned back to Wisconsin. Wisconsin’s management plan includes an aggressive, legislatively mandated wolf hunt that includes; the barbaric methold of wolf hounding, throwing dogs to wolves: “Out of all the states that hunt wolves, only Wisconsin allows hound hunters to use unleashed packs of dogs to hunt wolves. Wisconsin, quite literally, throws “dogs to the wolves.”  Source 

Russ Feingold Campaign
ABOUT RUSS FEINGOLD

Russ Feingold is known for his independence, his honesty and his work ethic on behalf of Wisconsin families. He has always stood up for the middle class families, students and workers who need economic opportunity, often drawing the ire of wealthy special interests and lobbyists.
A lifetime Wisconsin resident, Feingold represented Wisconsin in the U.S. Senate from 1993 to 2011, earning a reputation for doing what’s right, not what’s politically convenient. Whether it was opposing the war in Iraq, serving as an early voice for fiscal responsibility, or being the only Senator to oppose the Patriot Act, Feingold has shown that you can make a difference if you’re willing to speak truth to power.
As one of the namesakes of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law, Feingold established himself as a bipartisan voice and an accomplished legislator who is leading the fight against runaway special interest money in American elections.
In Wisconsin, Feingold has been known for truly listening to the people of Wisconsin. Every year as a senator, Feingold visited each of the 72 Wisconsin counties, in an effort to hear what Wisconsin families expect from their government.
He’s worked to improve care for veterans, fought against unfair trade agreements that ship American jobs overseas, and supported the growth of Wisconsin’s economy by listening to Wisconsinites and fighting for their needs.
In an effort to increase opportunity for Wisconsinites, Feingold worked to make college more affordable for Wisconsin students by investing in Pell Grants. He fought to help Wisconsin’s farmers get access to desperately needed credit during the recession and helped expand access to broadband across Wisconsin for small businesses, schools and clinics.
Senator Rus Feingold. Madison, WI. Monday, Aug. 24, 2015. Photo: Christopher Dilts/
After serving in the U.S. Senate, Feingold taught at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Lawrence University in Appleton and Stanford University in California. He served as United States Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Region of Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo at the State Department. And he founded the group Progressives United to continue his fight against special interest influence in our political system. In 2012 he authored the book While America Sleeps, A Wake Up Call For The Post 9/11 Era.
Feingold’s family settled in Janesville, Wisconsin in 1917. Raised by Sylvia and Leon Feingold, Russ went on to graduate from Janesville Craig High School, UW-Madison and Oxford University, before receiving his law degree from Harvard.

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Featured image John E Marriott Photography 

Help Humane Society of the United States in the Fight to Protect Wisconsin’s Gray Wolf

Humane Society of the U.S. stopped the trophy of hunt of wild wolves in Wisconsin, Great Lakes Region and in the U.S. numerous times. Please review the following Timeline of Gray Wolf Protection (source)  Donate, take action HSUS is on the front lines protecting Wisconsin’s gray wolf. 
 2014: The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issues an order invalidated the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2011 rule delisting wolves in the western Great Lakes region, requiring that sport hunting and trapping of wolves in the region must end immediately.

  

December 2014
: The annual wolf hunt ends early in Minnesota and Wisconsin, with hunters and trappers exceeding state quotas at record pace. In Minnesota, 272 wolves were killed, 22 more than the stated quota, with 84 percent of late season wolves killed in traps. In Wisconsin, 154 wolves were killed, four more than the quota permitted and 80 percent killed in leghold traps.

November 2014
: Voters repeal PA 520 (moving the wolf to the game species list) with a 55 percent “no” vote, and they also repeal PA 21 (giving the NRC the authority to decide which species can be hunted), with a 64 percent “no” vote. Repeal of PA 21 was approved by 69 of 83  a landslide rejection of NRC decision-making power.

September 2014:
Federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming are reinstated after a judge invalidated the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2012 rule delisting of the species in that state, requiring that sport hunting and trapping of wolves in Wyoming must end immediately.

August 2014
: The Michigan legislature passes the “Scientific Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act” and, not requiring the governor’s signature, the bill immediately becomes law (PA 281).

March 2014
: Keep Michigan Wolves Protected submits signatures to the Michigan Secretary of State, marking its second referendum for the November 4 ballot that would protect wolves and restore the right of Michigan voters to weigh in on critical wildlife issues. This referendum specifically would restore voter’s ability to weigh in on not just wolves, but almost any protected animal the NRC may wish to add to the list of game species to be hunted and trapped for sport.

November 2013
: Michigan’s first-ever annual wolf season begins and a total of 22 wolves are killed. A coalition funded by sport-hunting groups announces plans for its own petition drive for a citizen initiated bill called the “Scientific Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act,” which is intended to reaffirm the NRC’s ability to designate game species. In a move to make the bill immune from Michigan voter referendum, the bill included a $1 million appropriation earmark.

  


June 2013
: USFWS publishes its proposal to delist the gray wolf from the federal Endangered Species Act throughout the Lower 48 states where wolves are not already delisted.

May 2013
: Michigan Gov. Snyder signs legislation (PA 21) allowing the Natural Resources Commission to designate new game species instead of just the legislature. PA 21 is intended to allow wolf hunting even if PA 520 was suspended or repealed by referendum.

March 2013
: A coalition of groups including The HSUS called “Keep Michigan Wolves Protected” submit 253,705 signatures to the Michigan Secretary of State’s office, marking the coalition’s first petition drive to stop a wolf hunting season through referendum of PA 520. The referendum would allow Michigan voters to decide whether wolves should be hunted in the November 2014 election.

February 2013
: Wildlife protection groups, including The HSUS, file suit against the USFWS over its decision to remove the protections of the Endangered Species Act from gray wolves living in the western Great Lakes region.

  

October 2012
: Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signs legislation (PA 520) designating the wolf as a game species and authorizing the Natural Resources Commission to establish a wolf hunting season.

December 2012
: The HSUS and The Fund for Animals file a lawsuit to restore federal protections for Wyoming wolves.

September 2012
: The USFWS removes wolves in Wyoming from federal Endangered Species Act protections.

April 2012 – July 2012
: Wisconsin enacts legislation mandating a wolf hunting and trapping season, requiring that the state wildlife agency authorize the use of packs of dogs, night hunting, and snare and leg-hold traps. The state wildlife agency adopts regulations for the hunting and trapping of wolves in 2012-2013 via emergency rules, and sets the quota at 201 wolves.

July 2011 – August 2012
: Minnesota enacts legislation allowing a wolf hunting and trapping season once wolves are delisted. The state wildlife agency adopts regulations for the hunting and trapping of wolves in 2012-2013 via emergency rules, and sets the quota at 400 wolves.

December 2011
: The USFWS issues a final rule delisting the gray wolf population in the western Great Lakes.

  


April 2011
: Congress delists wolves in Montana and Idaho, and portions of Washington, Oregon, and Utah, marking the first time ever that Congress has removed protections for any species on the Endangered Species List.

August 2010
: In response to litigation brought by The HSUS and others, a federal court ruling reinstates federal protections for wolves in Idaho and Montana and prevents wolf hunts from going forward in those states.

August 2009
: The HSUS and others file suit to block wolf hunts in Idaho and Montana and restore federal Endangered Species act protections to wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains.

July 2009
: The HSUS enters into a court-approved settlement agreement with the USFWS that reinstated federal protections for wolves in the western Great Lakes region.

June 2009
: The HSUS and others file suit in federal court to block the delisting of Great Lakes wolves.

April 2009
: The USFWS issues a final rule delisting the gray wolf population in the western Great Lakes and northern Rockies, except for those in Wyoming.

September 2008
: In response to litigation filed by The HSUS and other organizations, a federal court overturns the USFWS’ decision to delist wolves in the western Great Lakes, thereby reinstating federal protections for gray wolves in the region.

July 2008
: In response to litigation filed by The HSUS and others, a federal judge issues an injunction restoring northern Rockies gray wolves to the endangered species list pending the conclusion of a lawsuit challenging their delisting.

February 2007
: The USFWS issues final rules delisting the gray wolf population in the western Great Lakes and northern Rocky Mountains.

2005 –
: The USFWS tries to strip wolves of protection by issuing special exemption permits to the state of Wisconsin that authorize state officials to kill dozens of wolves. These permits are thrown out by a federal court in response to a lawsuit by The HSUS.

  

2005
: Two federal courts both rule that the 2003 downlisting was arbitrary and capricious, returning the wolf to endangered status.

2003
: The USFWS issues a final rule downgrading most of the gray wolves living in the lower 48 states from endangered to threatened, making it easier for people to lethally take wolves.

1978
: Gray wolves are listed at the species level under the Endangered Species Act as endangered throughout the coterminous United States and Mexico, except in Minnesota, where gray wolves were listed as threatened.

1974
: Various subspecies of wolves are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.

1967
: Wolves are listed under the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966, the precursor to the Endangered Species Act.

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All images are from: CAI PRIESTLEY’S WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY BLOG

Federal Campaign to Keep Wolves Protected Asks for Your Help

This came in today to WODCW from HSUS Wisconsin State Director Melissa Tedtrowe. Please follow the directions and share. 

Hello everyone!
I’m writing to share a quick update on our federal campaign to keep wolves protected, and to ask for your help.
 

Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Barbara Boxer of California have composed a letter to President Obama, pointing out that a record number of anti-environmental provisions undermining the Endangered Species Act have been included in the Senate and House versions of the FY 2016 Interior appropriations bill. The letter, now co-signed by 14 other Senators, urges President Obama to flatly reject all riders that would undermine Endangered Species Act protections for particular species or otherwise erode the Act.  

 

We would like Senator Tammy Baldwin to sign onto that letter. In fact, I’ve been told that she is the most pivotal Congressperson to reach; if she signs on, it changes the dynamics in the Democratic caucus on the wolf issue.

 Will you please help me by making a call to Senator Baldwin’s D.C. office (202-224-5653) and saying the following:

 I am calling to ask Senator Baldwin to sign onto the Booker-Boxer letter to oppose delisting of wolves and other endangered species in the omnibus spending bill.

 And then please circulate this request among your networks!

 Thanks so much,

 Melissa

 ——–Melissa Tedrowe
Wisconsin State Director, State Affairs

mtedrowe@humanesociety.org

t 608.572.3122 f 414.755.0634

The Humane Society of the United States

2100 L Street NW Washington, DC 20037

humanesociety.org