Take Action to Protect Endangered Gray Wolves in the Lower 48 states.

The latest threat to the recovery of Gray wolves is S.3140 – A bill to require the Secretary of the Interior to issue a final rule relating to the delisting of the gray wolf under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.

This latest threat to gray wolves is sponsored by Sen. Lee, Mike [R-UT] introduced on 12/19/2019 and referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works. To find out more about Senate Committee members click on the following: Committee on Environment and Public Works. Please contact your Senators. You will find more information on how to contact them. Read on!

Latest Actions

Committees: Senate – Environment and Public Works
Latest Action: Senate – 12/19/2019 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

Gray Wolves Protected Under the Endangered Species Act

In the Lower 48, gray wolves have been listed under federal endangered species laws since the 1960s, when they had been extirpated, except for small populations in Michigan and Minnesota. Now, wolf populations in the Great Lakes area have grown to about 4,500 individuals. Wisconsin Alone now has 974 wolves. The Northern Rockies population includes more than 1,500 wolves across Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Washington, Oregon, Utah and California, thanks to natural migration from Canada and reintroductions in Yellowstone National Park.

But the recovery of Gray wolves has been, and still is being jeopardized by reckless state sanctioned trophy hunting.

The status of gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act has been contentious for years. In 2011, the USFWS removed gray wolves in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin from the endangered species list.

What happened when wolves lost their endangered species listing in these states?

Minnesota and Wisconsin held state sanctioned wolf hunts. Thankfully, the decision was challenged in court and reversed in 2014. Wolves were ordered back on to the ESA. An appeals court upheld that ruling in 2017.

Shortly after being delisted in Wisconsin gray wolves were allowed to be hunted with the use of dogs in 2013 & 2014 in state sanctioned wolf hunts.

The barbaric act of wolf hounding

The state of Wisconsin allows the use of dogs to hunt wolves when they are not protected under the Endangered Species Act. Wisconsin quite literally throws dogs to wolves.

In 2012, the Service removed gray wolves in Wyoming from the list, in a decision that was challenged in court but ultimately upheld. Congress removed wolves in the Northern Rockies from ESA protections through a rider attached to budget legislation in 2011. Currently, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana hold wolf hunting seasons.

Action Alert

Keep gray wolves in the Lower 48 states protected under the Endangered Species Act by contacting your senators.

Please be aware that as a matter of professional courtesy, many senators will acknowledge, but not respond to, a message from another senator’s constituent. Click Here to find your Senator Alternatively, you may phone the United States Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask to speak to your Senator.

Contacting the Senate

Click here to find your Senator’s contact information by state
By E-mail: All questions and comments regarding public policy issues, legislation, or requests for personal assistance should be directed to the Senators from your state. Some senators have e-mail addresses while others post comment forms on their websites. When sending e-mail to your senator, please include your return postal mailing address. Please be aware that as a matter of professional courtesy, many senators will acknowledge, but not respond to, a message from another senator’s constituent.

By Postal Mail

You can direct postal correspondence to your senator or to other U.S. Senate offices at the following address:

For Correspondence to U.S. Senators:

Office of Senator (Name)
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510

The senate bill has been referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

Senate Committee members click on the following: Committee on Environment and Public Works.

By Telephone

Alternatively, you may phone the United States Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121. A switchboard operator will connect you directly with the Senate office you request

Take Action to protect America’s Gray wolf!

The Endangered Species Act protects the endangered species, and the habitat it depends upon.

Extractive industries, such as; oil & gas, mining, lumbering, and real-estate developers want free & easy access to wilderness areas, but gray wolves stand in their way. Don’t let these greedy extractive industries destroy decades of wolf recovery. Take Action!

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