“The carcasses were dumped in a ditch on the side of Old Highway 2 near Bayfield county’s Fish Creek area,” Amie Egstad the WDNR Conservation Warden of Bayfield County said.

All but two were skinned and left in the ditch. Warden Egstad stated the carcasses were dumped around two weeks ago. She has received a few tips about who’s responsible for dumping the carcasses on state land. It’s still being investigated and anyone can call her at 1-715-209-7618 with information pertaining to the investigation. The WDNR is currently investigating a complaint of several coyote carcasses illegally dumped in northern Bayfield County. If anyone has information to assist in the investigation please contact the DNR Hotline 800-TIP-WDNR. https://dnr.wi.gov/contact/

Please contact WDNR Warden Egstad at 715-209-7618 if you know who dumped the coyote carcasses.

In my conversation with Warden Egstad I learned that it’s not just about a littering ticket because dumped carcasses spread disease, pollute the waterways, and attract other animals to the dumps. The dumping of so many carcasses is a major concern for WDNR because of pollution and a lack of respect for the environment.

And another concern is if the coyote bodies contain led shot which can be highly poisonous to wildlife that feed on carrion. Wildlife such as eagles, pet dogs and any animal that scavenges will be poisoned by the led shot.

Thirty coyote carcasses were dumped on state land.

Warden Egstad doesn’t believe the dumped carcasses were from a Wildlife Killing Contest because the time of the last two contests in the area accured two months ago. In the state of Wisconsin coyote can be hunted year round 24/7 days a week and there’s no limits on how many they can kill. Coyote are hunted by the use of dogs, trapped and considered a furbearer. In the state of Wisconsin coyote are considered vermin and can be shot on sight.

The WDNR is currently investigating a complaint of several coyote carcasses illegally dumped in northern Bayfield County. If anyone has information to assist in the investigation please contact the DNR Hotline 800-TIP-WDNR. https://dnr.wi.gov/contact/

Last year a northern Wisconsin resident discovered a similar carcass dump. “Altogether I found more than 60 coyote carcasses at the dump site before I quit counting,” said Paul DeMain, the Hayward resident who took the photos on April 29, 2018, near a popular hiking trail in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. “Killing and dumping wild animals is repugnant to living beings, life, and our coexistence with creation.” Project Coyote & WODCW Media Release

Paul DeMain, Hayward resident took the photos on April 29, 2018, near a popular hiking trail in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest.

Carcass dumps like these show a concerning lack of respect for wildlife. As a Wildlife advocate, environmentalist and a member of  The National Coalition to End Wildlife Killing Contests these carcass dumps prove it’s time to move away from wantonly Killing of Wildlife to a Compassionate conservation ethic. ~Rachel Tilseth

Watch the following video from http://www.projectcoyote.org

The coyote, our unique Song Dog who has existed in North America since the Pleistocene, is the most persecuted native carnivore in North America. The coyote is the flagship species for all misunderstood and exploited carnivores. Poisoned, trapped, aerial gunned and killed for bounties and in contests, an estimated half a million coyotes are slaughtered every year in the U.S. — one per minute. ~Project Coyote

Photograph is part of Wisconsin’s & Minnesota Wildlife Photography Contest hosted by Project Coyote and Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin.

For more information and how to submit a photograph click here. Shoot wildlife with a camera! Visit the contest’s Facebook Page Click here.

More on Wisconsin’s effort to end wildlife killing contests…

“This discovery is evidence of the effect our current hunting regulations have on coyotes. One person can kill as many coyotes as they choose, any time all year long and using any method they want. There is no record of how many are taken, where or how they are taken and what impact that has on their populations or the ecosystem. The underlying message to the public is that coyotes have no value. Wildlife killing contests are a symptom of this lack of consideration and take advantage of the absence of limits here in Wisconsin.” ~Mikii Opahle is founder of the group Stop The Madness

Mikii Opahle is founder of the group Stop The Madness and is a member of The National Coalition to End Wildlife Killing Contests along with Freinds of the Wisconsin Wolf and Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin. There are two groups connected: Stop The Madness Group, and Stop The Madness Northern Action Group. Wisconsin residents concerned about stopping wildlife killing contests are encouraged to ask to join these groups.

Coexistence with wild carnivores through non lethal means.

Foxlights are a nighttime predator deterrent that are saving lives! I’m a sales rep email rachelfoxlights@gmail.com for more information.

USDA experiments with new tool to deter wolves.
Foxlights Latest Method To Keep Wolves Away From Livestock By Danielle Kaeding, June 21, 2016, Wisconsin Public Radio

Wildlife officials in Wisconsin are experimenting with a new tool called Foxlights to help farmers and producers keep wolves away from livestock.

They were invented by an Australian sheep farmer to keep away foxes. Rachel Tilseth is founder of the advocacy website Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin and a distributor of the lights. Tilseth sold 25 to the U.S. Department of Agriculture APHIS-Wildlife Services in northern Wisconsin and said they deter wolves from coming near livestock.

“It can be seen from a mile away,” she explained. “It operates with a six volt battery giving up to 12 months of nonstop protection. A light sensor automatically turns it on when it’s at dusk and turns it off during the day.”

Tilseth said the lights are relatively inexpensive at $85 on up. Wisconsin Wildlife Services installed the lights recently on a Douglas County farm experiencing wolf problems. David Ruid, supervisory wildlife biologist with Wildlife Services, said he’s optimistic about their effectiveness, but cautions that lights haven’t always kept wolves away from livestock.

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